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Full text of "Annual report of the Governor of the Panama Canal for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920"

w 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



GOVERNOR OF 
THE PANAMA CANAL 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR 
ENDED JUNE 30 

1920 




3186 



WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1920 



UNIVERSITY 
OF FLORIDA 
LIBRARY 




ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



GOVERNOR OF 
THE PANAMA CANAL 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR 
ENDED JUNE 30 

1920 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1920 






Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2010 witli funding from 

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from Lyrasis and the Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofgo1920cana 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page 

Report of the Governor of The Panama Canal 1 

Formal opening of Canal to commerce 1 

Organization 5 

Department of operation and maintenance 5 

Building division 5 

Locks operation and maintenance 7 

Electrical division 8 

Municipal division 10 

Meteorology and hydrography 11 

Section of surveys 13 

Office engineer 13 

Dredging division 14 

Marine division 16 

Mechanical division 17 

Supply department 18 

Labor 18 

Quarters 19 

Transportation facilities 19 

Materials and supplies 19 

Obsolete material 20 

Fuel-oil tanks 20 

Panama Canal press 20 

Subsistence 20 

Commissary division 20 

Accounting department 21 

Executive department 26 

Bureau of clubs and playgrounds 27 

Record bureau 27 

Personnel bureau 28 

Property bureau 28 

Bureau of pay rolls 28 

Biu-eau of statistics 28 

Division of schools 28 

Police and fire division 29 

Division of civil affairs 29 

Bureau of posts. 29 

Bureau of custorns 30 

Shipping commissioner 30 

Administration of estates 30 

Courts 30 

Relations with Panama ? 31 

Office of the special attorney 31 

Health department 33 

Division of hospitals 34 

Ancon Hospital 34 

Corozal Hospital 35 

Colon Hospital 35 

Santo Tomas Hospital 35 

Palo Seco Leper Asylum 36 

Sanitation 36 

Quarantine division 36 

Washington office 37 

Appendix A. 

Report of the engineer of maintenance 39 

Organization 39 

Locks division 39 

Operation 39 

Lockages 40 . 



S:ioy^ 



m 



rV TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Report of the engineer of maintenance — Continued. 

Locks division — Continued. Page. 

Water consumption — Gatun Lake 41 

Paintins; and maintenance 41 

Towing locomotives 42 

Transformer rooms 42 

Miter gates 42 

Rising stem valves 42 

Cylindrical valves 42 

Culvert screens 42 

Emergency dam 43 

Fenders 43 

Transportation 43 

Pacific locks 43 

Organization and personnel 43 

Operation 44 

Paint machine 44 

Launches and boats 44 

Corozal store 44 

Miscellaneous 44 

Maintenance 44 

Overhauling at Mkafiores 45 

Overhauling at Pedro Miguel 46 

Tables- 
Pedro Miguel locks — lockages and vessels 47 

Mirafiores locks — lockages and vessels 48 

Pacific locks — locking operations _ 48 

Annual report of water drawn from Gatun and Mirafiores 

Lakes for lockages and other purposes 49 

Atlantic locks 49 

Organization and personnel 49 

Operation 50 

Maintenance 50 

Building division 52 

Organization 52 

Personnel 52 

Building operations 52 

Pier No. 6 _ - 52 

Naval submarine base and naval air station 53 

Army aviation base, France Field 53 

Barracks, quarters, and wharf. Fort Sherman 53 

Fort Davis and Fort Clayton Army posts 53 

Costs ■- 54 

Journeymen 's rates 54 

New silver townsite. Mount Hope 55 

Lighthouse at channel end of east breakwater 55 

ColoH-Cristobal incinerator plant. ._ 55 

Combined shop and storehouse, Cristobal mole 56 

Panama Railroad stables 56 

Reniodeling of the old Royal Mail pier for the Panama Railroad 

for native produce 56 

Concrete oil tanks 56 

Miscellaneous work 57 

Work for individuals and companies 57 

Force 57 

Tables- 
Increase in cost of gold labor due to increase in pay over rates 
in effect when project was approved— Fort Clayton Army 

post ; 58 

Increase in cost of gold labor due to increase in pay oyer rates 
in effect when project was approved— Fort Davis Army 

post 59 

Additional cost due to increase in wages to silver employees . . 60 

Estimated and actual time in man-days for various crafts 61 

Comparative unit cost of buildings 63 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. V 

Report of the engineer of maintenance — Continued, Page. 

Dredging division 66 

Division organization 66 

Dredging plant 66 

Tables- 
Number of days dredges were retired from dredging service 67 

Output of all dredges, with total and unit costs 67 

Yardage removed to —42-foot mean sea-level contour in the At- 
lantic Ocean to Gamboa 69 

Yardage removed from Gaillard Cut, Gamboa to Pedro Miguel 

locks 69 

Yardage removed, Pedro Miguel locks to the —45-foot mean sea- 
level contour in the Pacific Ocean 69 

Number of cubic yards removed from the Canal prism 70 

Yardage remaining to be removed from the Canal prism 70 

Distribution of material removed from Gaillard Cut 71 

Dumps 71 

Subaqueous rock excavation 72 

Table— Performance of drill boat Teredo No. 2 72 

Miscellaneous dredging 72 

Atlantic terminals 72 

Pacific terminals 73 

Sand and gravel production 73 

Drainage 73 

Slide inspection and reports 73 

Mindi dikes and groins 73 

Water hyacinths 73 

Surveys 73 

Office 73 

Electrical division 74 

Organization and personnel 74 

Character and extent of work 74 

Power-system equipment and improvements 74 

Operation of power system 75 

Gatun spillway 76 

Telephone and telegraph systems 77 

Table — Canal Zone telephone system 77 

Fire-alarm system 78 

Railway-signal system 78 

Tables- 
Responsible and nonresponsible signal failures, arm move- 
ments, and train-minutes delay for each month during 

fiscal year 78 

Responsible signal interruptions for fiscal year ending June 

30,1920 79 

Miscellaneous electrical work 79 

Municipal engineering division 80 

Organization 81 

Personnel 81 

Southern district 81 

Work performed for individuals and companies 82 

Work performed for departments, divisions, and others 83 

Northern district 85 

Work performed for departments, divisions, and others 87 

Operation of water-purification plants and testing laboratories 88 

Section of meteorology and hydrography 91 

Personnel 91 

Meteorology 91 

Special investigations 94 

Pilot balloon flights 94 

Tables accompanying meteorological section, list of 94 

Hydrography 98 

Branch hydrographic office, Cristobal ■. . 100 

Special investigations 100 

Tables accompanying hydrographic section, list of 100 

«847— 20 II 



VI TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Report of the engineer of maintenance — Continued. Page. 

Section of surveys 104 

Building lots 104 

Maintenance records 105 

Canal Zone boundary 105 

Triangulation 105 

Alliajuela basin 105 

Supply department 105 

Health department 106 

Electrical division 106 

Land office 106 

Fortification division 106 

Navy Department 106 

Miscellaneous 107 

Section of office engineer 107 

Appendix B. 

Report of the marine superintendent 109 

Operation of board of local inspectors 109 

Shipping statistics 110 

Tables- 
Summary of commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during fiscal 

year 1 920 and since its opening to commercial traffic 112 

Number of commercial vessels of various nationalities passing through 

The Panama Canal 113 

Appendix G. 

Report of the superintendent, mechanical division 115 

Organization 115 

Principal work performed 115 

At Balboa shops 115 

At Cristobal shops 117 

Balboa dr>^ dock 117 

Cristobal dry dock 117 

Miscellaneous matters 117 

Improvements 118 

Needs for the coming fiscal year 119 

Statistical data 119 

Tables accompanying report, list of 119 

Appendix D. 

Report of the chief quartermaster, supply department 129 

Organization 129 

Personnel 129 

Labor 129 

Quarters 130 

Zone sanitation 131 

Motor transportation 131 

Animal transportation 132 

Material and supplies 132 

Sales 132 

Surplus, obsolete, and scrap material and equipment 133 

Fuel-oil plants 133 

Gasoline storage 134 

Panama Canal press 134 

Subsistence 135 

Commissary division 135 

Costa llican agency 136 

Changes, alterations, and improvements in retail commissaries 136 

Products shippefl to the United States 137 

Fresh-beef shipments 137 

Publicity 137 

Material salvaged from steamship Marne 137 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. VH 

Reporfof^the chiefjquartermaster, supply department — Continued. Page. 

Cattle industry 137 

Purchases 138 

Transportation 139 

Sales 140 

Health 140 

Pastures 141 

Plantations 142 

Poultry farm 143 

Dairy farm 143 

Tables- 
Occupants of Panama Canal and Panama Railroad quarters, June 30, 

1920 144 

Applications for family quarters on file June 30, 1920 144 

Sales 144 

Value of material received during fiscal year on requisition 145 

Sales of obsolete and scrap material and equipment during fiscal year, 

the original cost of which amounted to more than $500 ^ 147 

Houses, apartments, and occupants, by districts, of gold and silver 

quarters, as of June 30, 1920 147 

Operation of Hotel Tivoli, fiscal year 148 

Summary of operations. Hotel Aspinwall, fiscal year 148 

Summary of operations of restaurants, fiscal year 148 

Summary of operations, laborers' messes, fiscal year 149 

Obsolete and surplus material (appraised values) 149 

American scrap operations 149 

Fuel oil handled _ 149 

Comparative statement of output of manufacturing plants, commissary 

division, supply department, fiscal years 1916 to 1920 150 

Quantities of certain staple articles purchased during fiscal year as 

compared with previous fiscal year 151 

Comparative selling prices for June 30, 1920, as against June 30, 1919. 151 
Articles purchased by the products buyer in Costa Rica during fiscal 

year 152 

More important articles purchased in Haiti during fiscal year 152 

List of tiie important articles (1) purchased locally, (2) from planta- 
tions of the cattle industry', (3) from Corozal farm and Army truck 
gardens, from local producers and importing agencies, and by the 

local commissary buyer, Panama 152 

Appendix E. 

Report of the auditor 153 

Organization 153 

Pavmaster 153 

Collector 154 

Tolls 154 

Accounting to the Treasury for collections 155 

Canal appropriations 155 

Current appropriations 156 

Operation and maintenance 157 

Business operations 158 

Material and supplies 159 

Construction of Canal and capital additions 159 

Manufacturing plants 160 

Public works, Panama and Colon 160 

Exchange of property -with. Panama Railroad Co 161 

Examination of pay rolls 161 

Inspection of accounts 162 

Time inspection 162 

Freight claims 162 

Claims for damages to vessels 162 

Bonds of employees 162 

Coupon books 163 

Canal Zone accounts 163 

Clubhouse accounts 163 

Claims for injuries and deaths 164 

Operations with Panama Railroad Co.'b funds 165 



Tm TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Report of the auditor — Continued. Page. 

Railroad, harbor terminals, etc 165 

Farm ind ustries 166 

Commissary 167 

General 167 

Tables accompanying report, list of 167 

Appendix F. 

Report of the executive secretary 229 

Population of the Canal Zone 229 

Working force 229 

Force actually at work on .Tune 23, 1920 230 

Force reports, by months, fiscal year 231 

High and low force records, December, 1906, toJune30, 1920, by 

fiscal years 232 

Living costs 232 

Complaints of American employees 233 

Compensation of American employees 233 

Compensation of West Indian employees 236 

Strike of West Indian employees 237 

Employees and the land 238 

Publicity 238 

Organization of executive department 240 

The executive office 240 

Bureau of clubs and playgrounds 240 

Report of director of physical education and play 241 

Record bureau 243 

Personnel bureau 244 

Property bureau 244 

Btireau of pay rolls 245 

Table — Statement of work of bureau of pay rolls, fiscal year 245 

Bureau of statistics 246 

Survejdng officer 247 

Division of schools 247 

Education of apprentices 249 

Police and fire division 249 

Police section 250 

Fire section 252 

Division of civil affairs 253 

Bureau of posts 253 

Biireau of customs 254 

Shipping commissioner 255 

Administration of estates 255 

The courts 255 

Special attorney and district attorney 256 

Marshal for the Canal Zone 256 

Relations with Panama 256 

Appendix — Report of chief of division of civil affairs 258 

Bureau of posts 258 

Number of post offices 259 

Lock boxes 259 

Money orders 259 

Registered , insured , and C. 0. D. mail 259 

Dutiable packages _ 260 

Duplicate money orders and investigations 260 

Dead-letter section 260 

Violation of postal laws and regulations 260 

Dispatches to the United States and other countries 261 

Delivery of mail to ships in transit 261 

United States transit mail 261 

Count of mail matter 262 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. IX 

Report of the executive secretary— Continued. 

Appendix— Report of chief of division of civil atf airs— Continued. I'age 

Bureau of customs 263 

Movement of vessels ^°^ 

Merchandise for Republic of Panama ^o^ 

Free entry of merchandise ^^^ 

Attempted smuggling 264 

Opium traffic ^^* 

Household inspections ^^ 

Certification of invoices j^^ 

Special customs service ^^^ 

Prohibited aliens j^^ 

Shipping commissioner ^^ 

Administration of estates ^^^ 

Licenses and permits j^ 

Insurance companies and corporations ^^° 

Tables 

Vessels entered and cleared, seamen shipped and discharged, and 

seamen lodged , subsisted , and repatriated , fiscal year 269 

Number of estates of deceased and insane employees, by nation- 
alities, settled by administrator of estates diuing fiscal year 269 

Number of estates received and settled, and amount of funds 

handled during fiscal vear ; - - 270 

Number of mail parcels released free of duty, number on which 
duty has been paid to the Government of Panama, and the 
amount of duty as shown by receipts on file, by offices, during 

fiscal year .- • ^70 

Number of insured and C. O. D. parcel-post parcels and registered 

articles delivered, by offices, during fiscal year 270 

Letters and parcels registered and insured, by offices, during fiscal 

vear • ^71 

Number and amount of money orders issued and amount of money 
on deposit at post offices, by offices, as reported by postmasters, 

for fiscal year 2/1 

Receipts - ^i ^ 

Summary of insurance business transacted in the Canal Zone 

during calendar vear 1919 - - - 272 

Surplus of postal receipts over expenditures if 40 per cent subsidy 
on stamp sales had not been paid to Republic of Panama and if 
postage had been paid on official matter which was carried free 

during fiscal year 272 

Appendix G. 

Report of the district attorney 273 

, Table — Criminal prosecutions "'^ 

Appendix H. 

Report of the special attorney 278 

Land matters of The Panama Canal ^78 

Tabulation of land claims 281 

Land claims disposed of during fiscal year 282 

Panama Canal land leases ^°^ 

Panama Railroad land matters 284 

Panama Railroad leases and licenses reported by the land agent 284 

Statement of Panama Railroad leases and licenses in effect July 1, 1920 . 285 

Panama Railroad litigation 287 

District court, Cristobal division 288 

District court, Balboa division 289 

The Supreme Court of the United States 289 

District court, Cristobal division 290 

District court, Balboa division 291 

Magistrate's court, Balboa division 292 

The Supreme Court of the United States 292 

Land litigation of the Panama Railroad Co 292 

Panama Railroad Co. litigation pending in the courts of Panama 293 

Legislation 294 



X TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Appendix I. 

Page. 

Report of the chief health officer 298 

General remarks 298 

Vital statistics 301 

Employees 301 

Effects of race 302 

Caual Zone 302 

Panama City 303 

Colon 303 

Ancon Hospital 303 

Board of health laboratory 305 

Corozal Hospital 306 

Colon Hospital 308 

Santo Tomas Hospital 309 

Palo Seco Eeper Asylum 311 

District dispensaries 312 

District dentists 312 

Sanitation 312 

Canal Zone 312 

Panama health office 315 

Colon-Cristobal health office 316 

Quarantine 318 

Immigration inspection 319 

Expenses 320 

Tables accompanying report, list of 320 

Appendix J. 

Report of the general purchasing officer and chief of the Washington office 340 

Table showing increases in salaries authorized over organization of July 1, 

1918 348 

Appendix K. 

Acts of Congress and Executive orders relating to The Panairia Canal and to the 

Canal Zone, index 349 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Appendix A. 

(Report of the engineer of maintenance.) 
Plate. 

1. Regimental headquarters. 

2. Two-family field officers' and captains' quarters. 

3. Six set lieutenants' quarters. 

4. Fom'-family lieutenants' quarters. 

5. Four-family noncommissioned officers' quarters. 

6. Special barracks. 

7. Battalion barracks. 

8. Gaillard Cut. Cucaracha slide. May, 1920. Line indicates limits of Canal 

prism. 

9. Gaillard Cut. Cucaracha slide. August, 1920. Line indicates limits of Canal 

prism. 

10. Gaillard Cut. Cucaracha slide excavation. March 21, 1920. 

11. Gaillard Cut. Cucaracha slide excavation. September 10, 1920. 

12. Monthly rainfall, calendar year 1919, and station averages. 

13. Distribution of rainfall in Canal Zone, maximum, minimum, current and average 

calendar years. 

14. Chagres River drainage basin; mean monthly discharge at Alhajuela; year 1919, 

dry season 1920, land 18-year average. 

15. Chagres River drainage basin; discharge at Alhajuela; maximum, minimum, cur- 

rent and average calendar years. 

16. Operating uses of Gatun Lake water supply; year 1919, dry season 1920. 

17. Gatun Lake watershed; yields and losses; massed curves, 1919. 

18. Gatun Lake watershed; total yields; year 1919, dry season 1920, and 9-year average. 

19. Gatun Lake watershed; comparative dry season hydrographs and curves; monthly 

uses and losses, dry seasons 1917-1918-1919-1920. 

Appendix C. 
(Report of the superintendent, mechanical division.) 

20. Charts showing classes of work and source of revenue. 

21. Gross overhead expense percentage compared with the total direct labor charges, 

fiscal year 1919-20. 

22. Chart showing comparatively the total productive labor, indirect expense, super- 

vision, maintenance of tools, machinery and shop buildings, and the power 
consumptions. 

23. Chart showing the growth of work at Panama Canal repair wharves, 1916-1920, 

inclusive. 

Appendix F. 

(Report of the executive secretary.) 

24. Balboa, Canal Zone. Playgrounds for children. Halloween party. October, 

1918. 

25. Balboa, Canal Zone, school. Flag drill. Closing exercises. June 25, 1920. 

XI 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 



The Panama Canal, 
Office of the Governor, 
Balboa HeigJits, Canal Zone, September S3, 1920. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the annual report covering the 
construction, operation, maintenance, and sanitation of The Panama 
Canal for the fiscal year ended June' 30, 1920. 

The Canal was informally opened to traffic in August, 1914, On 
July 12, 1920, the President issued the following proclamation 
formpJly announcing the completion of the Canal and declaring it 
open to commerce: 

BY THE PRESIDENT OP THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 

A Proclamation. 

Whereas section 4 of the act of Congress entitled "An act to provide for the open- 
ing, maintenance, protection, and operation of The Panama Canal, and the sanitation 
and government of the Canal Zone," approved August 24, 1912 (37 Stat. L., 561), 
and known as the Panama Canal act, provides that upon the completion of The 
Panama Canal the President shall cause it to be officially and formally opened for 
use and operation; and 

\ TMiereas the canal is completed and is open for commerce: 

^"Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, 
acting under the authority of the Panama Canal act, do hereby declare and pro- 
claim the official and formal opening of The Panama Canal for use and operation in 
conformity with the laws of the United States. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United 
States to be affixed . 

^Done in the District of Columbia this 12th day of July, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand nine hundred and twenty, and of the independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred and forty-fifth. 

[seal.] Woodrow Wilson. 

By the President: 

Norman H. Davis, 

Acting Secretary of State. 

This formality was necessaiy in order to comply willi the require- 
ments of the Panama Canal act. 

During the six years of oiperation there has heen a marked increase 
in traffic through the Canal notwithstanding the fact that the World 
War has ever\^vhere prevented the normal development of ocean- 
going commerce. After the entry of the United States into the war 
there was a decrease in commercial traffic, due to the diversion of 
certain lines of ships to trans-Atlantic service, which was more than 
offset by the increase in traffic growing out of the war, chiefly on 
account of the development of the nitrate trade with the Pacific 
coast of South America. 

8^7—20 1 1 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



The number of comme'rcial transits, the amount received from tolls, 
and other collections, and the current expenses of maintenance and 
operation for the several fiscal years are shown in the following table: 



Fiscal year. 


Number 
of com- 
mercial 
transits. 


Tolls and 

other 
revenues. 


Current ex- 
penses of 
operation and 
maintenance. 


1915 


1,072 
760 
1,806 
2,068 
2,028 
2,478 


$4,343,383.69 
2,558,542.38 
5,808,398.70 
6,411,843.28 
6,354,016.98 
8,935,871.57 


$4 123 128 09^ 


1916 


6,'909',750'.15 
6,788,047.60 
5,920,342.94 
6,112,194.77 
6,548,272.4a 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 





For the same period the number of Canal transits by Government 
vessels exempted from tolls and the total tonnage of cargo carried 
were as follows for each fiscal year: 



Fiscal year. 


Number 

of 
vessels. 


Cargo. 


Fiscalyear. 


Number 

of 
vessels. 


Carso. 


1915 


16 

43 

ion 


Tom. 
43.647 
76, 675 

147, 105 


1918 


112 
179 

267 


Tons. 
36,74S 
93,611 


1916 


1919 ..- 


1917 


1920 . 




351 332 









Included in the above are 172 merchant ships carrying cargo for the Government. 

The revenue of the Canal exceeded the current expense for its 
operation and maintenance by $2,387,509.14 for the fiscal 5"ear 
1920, and the total current expense of operation and maintenance 
for the six-year period since 1914 exceeded the total revenues by 
the amount of S2, 231, 091. 61. This excess will be more than over- 
come by the revenues of 1921. The year in which the expenses 
exceeded the revenues in the greatest amount was 1916. during 
which traffic was suspended for six months on account of the great 
slides at Culebra, and the expenses were increased by the cost of 
removing them. 

The Canal in its present state represents a capital exnenditure bj- 
the United States of $306,650,000, exclusive of ex])eiiditures for its 
military and naval defense. The investment, from one point of 
view, may be regarded as having been made and justified in the 
creation of an invaluable element of national defense. If this be 
true, the Canal has an additional value in rendering useful service in 
time of peace, and in returning to the Federal Ti'casury revenue 
more than sufiicient to defray the expense of its operation and main- 
tenance. It is capable of doing more than this; and it is not an idle 
prediction to state that with pro])er management directed along 
the lines of a large business enterprise, it will within a reasonable 
period of normal world conditions earn an actual profit on the cost. 
From an analysis made under reasonable assumpti(^ns as to amorti- 
zation, depreciation, obsolescence, and interest, it is estimated that 
with an annual revenue of three times that of 1920 the Canal will 
make a financial return on the investment. The time required to 
jn'oduce this result will be afl'ected by any changes in legislation 
affecting charges for tolls. In the meantime the Canal is performing^ 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 3 

an im})ortaiit commercial service in a promising field by stimulating 
trade with the Orient anrl with the west coast of South America. 
Over 25 per cent of the cargo handled thiough the Canal since its 
opening to the end of the fiscal year 1920 was in transit between the 
Iinited States and South Ameiica, and 14^ ])er cent was between 
the Atlantic coast of the United States and the (Jrient. Among 
nations the chief users of the Canal are the United States and Great 
Britain, The number of vessels ])assed each year for these nations 
and for all other nations was as follows: 



Fiscal year. 


rnited 
States. 


Great 
Britain. 


Another 
nations. 


Fiscal year. 


United 
States. 


Great 
Britain. 


All other 
nations. 


1915 


470 
23S 
464 


465 
353 
780 


153 
191 
632 


1918 


62S 

786 

1,129 


699 
602 
753 


803 


1916 


1P19 


637 


1917 


1920 


596 







By authority of the Pa?iama Canal act, stores of coal, fuel oil, 
shi]i ( handlery, groceries, meats, and miscellaneous supplies are 
maintained by The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad to meet 
the requirements of ships that use the Canal, and facilities for repairs 
to ships are provided at the two termiinals, including the dry dock 
at Balboa, capable of receiving any sliip that can pass tlu'ough the 
locks. These auxiliaries have been largely utilized and are of great 
value in carrying out the policy of Uiaking the Canal attractive in 
all of the incidental services that are considered by shipping interests in. 
routing their vessels. } t has not been the purpose to make large j^rofits 
on these activities, but rather to regulate the charges so as safely to 
cover the cost. The receipts from these miscellaneous services to 
shipping during the year were as follows: 

Coal $6, 032, 578. 74 

Water 55, 412. 64 

Oil, groceries, and miscellaneous supplies 1, 274, 556. 18 

Mechanical repairs to ships 3, 863, 933. 00 

Tvith the growing traffic, it will be necessary to expand these 
auxiliary facilities in the near future. The old dr^^ dock and shops 
at Cristobal, inherited from the French, and utilized during construc- 
tion days for rejiairs to Canal equipment, are notably inadequate to 
meet the present recpiirements of commercial steamers. These 
developments will require appropriations in addition to the amount 
of current expenditures, but the earnings of the Canal will be corre- 
spondingly increased and the amount expended will be returned 
from the revenues derived. Jf the developments are permitted to 
lag behind the increasing traffic, the Canal will not be in position to 
handle all of the business ofl'ered. 

The problems confronting the head of the local administration of 
Canal affairs are those arising from (1) the maintenance of the Canal, 
the Panama Railroad and other auxiliaries, involving the ])ractice of 
civil engineering in all its branches, inchiding sanitation: (2) the opera- 
tion of the Canal, requiring technical knowledge of all of the engi- 
neeiing features of the Canal and of its navigation, and of the con- 
duct of a great business enterprise of unusually varied ramifications; 
and C3) the government of the Canal Zone, involving the administra- 
tion of civil laws affecting persons living within the limits of the 



4 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Canal Zone or en.tering upon it. Tlio responsibility of the Governor 
in all of these matters is complete; his authority is also complete, 
as determined by the oro-anic act and b}^ the Executive orders of the 
President issued thereunder. The duties, responsibilities, and autlior- 
ities of the Governor are civil in character and have no relation to the 
pre|>aration for the defense of the Canal in time of war. He con- 
tinues his functions durino- vvar, except that within the discretion 
of the l^resident, under authority of the organic act, the commanding 
officer of the military forces on the Canal Zone may be given entire 
control during a state of war, in which case the Governor performs 
his duties under the direction of the military commander, in every 
branch of his work the Governor lias the responsibility of maintain- 
ing an efficient force of employees and of settling locally, so far as 
possible, all issues raised by them concerning compensation, condi- 
tions of employment, and other matters. A liberal, but, in my judg- 
ment, a reasonable policy, has been followed in adjusting these issues. 
The organic act of the Canal fixes a maximum limit of ]>ay for its 
employees for services similar to those of Government employees in 
continental United States. Many employees perform duties for 
which there is no parallel in other Government service, and their 
compensation is deduced from prevailing commercial rates in the 
United States for similar work. In general, the allowable in- 
crease of 25 per cent above United States rates is applied to Ameri- 
can employees, adjustments being made in some cases for purposes 
of coordination among positions of equivalent responsibility in our 
organization. The Canal schedules of pay have therefore followed 
the increases that have occurred in the United States. In the case 
of the alien labor force, composed almost altogether of West Indians, 
increases in wages have kept pace with increases in living costs, as 
compared with the standards of 1914, A permanent board of heads 
of departments and divisions is convened every three months to make 
thorough investigation of changes in cost of living to these employees 
and to recommend appropriate changes in wages to meet them. 
There lias been a large surplus on the Isthmus of this class of help, 
but during the year 11)20 some emigration has occurred to Cuba and 
the United States. 

General industrial conditions on the Canal are good. There has 
been some unrest, but less than elsewhere. Care has been taken to 
avoid arbitrary and unreasonable action in adjusting elements of 
discontent, with results that have been generall v satisfactory. Repre- 
sentation has been allowed to employees on boards appointed for 
making recommendations concerning rates of pay and workino- con- 
ditions. It has been my experience that among American employees 
decisions based upon a consideration of both sides of the questions 
at issue have been acceptable to them, and that, in general, they take 
an active interest in the Canal and its welfare and have a commendable 
feeling of pride in it. 

The turnover in force of Americans during the year was 33 per cent. 
Some of it is attributable to resignations on account of opportunities 
foi- betterment elsewhere, but most of it to the fact that the American 
woi'kman does not wish to make his permanent home in the Tropics, 
and while liere feels out of touch with ])ossibilities of business advance- 
ment at home. I do not advise taking away the ])rivileges now 
enjoyed by our American employees, butl)elieve that the local situa- 



KEPOKT OF THE GOVERNOK. 

tion should be allowed to work itself out undei' conditions as at pres- 
ent established and along the lines of comparison with industrial 
conditions in the United States. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The heads of departments and divisions remain as reported last 
year, with the foUowinsr exceptions : 

By orders from the Navy Department, Capt. L. R. Sargent, United 
States Navy, marine superintendent, was relieved fi'om duty with 
the Canal on April 15, and Capt. E. P. Jesso]), United States Navy, 
was detailed for appointment to the position. 

Mr. T. Ij. Clear, who resigned the position of collector on September 
20, 1018, to accept a commission in the Inspector General's Depart- 
ment of the Ignited States Army, returned to his former position ■\\dth 
the Canal on September 6, 1919. 

Mr. J. H. McLean, paymaster, resigned on November 15, 1019, and 
Mr. R. W. Glaw, assistant paymaster, was promoted to fill the vacancy 
on January 24, 1920. 

DEPARTMENT OF OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Building Division. 

This division remained in the charge of Mr. T. C. Morris, resident 
engineer, under the supervision of the engineer of maintenance. 
On account of lack of appropriation no large building projects were 
in progress for the Canal, and the chief operations of the building 
division comprised the construction of two Army posts, one at New 
Gatun and one at Miraflores, from Army appropriations which were 
allotted by the Secretary of War to the Governor for expenditure. 
The total amount appropriated for the projects was $4,986,849, of 
which $2,851,600 for buildings were allotted to the building division. 

A general description of the buildings constructed was contained 
in the report of last year. Unavoidable delays were experienced in 
the progress of the work on account of delays in filling requisitions 
for material and for skilled mechanics. Under a requirement of 
the act appropriating the funds no material, supplies, or equipment 
could be purchased until it was determined whether or not they 
could be furnished from available surplus stores of the War Depart- 
ment. In filling our requisitions it was necessary for the general 
purchasing officer in Washington to communicate with the various 
surplus stores of the construction divisions of the Arnw and attempt 
to purchase all available material from these stores. In some 
instances certain materials were available when the inquiries were 
made but had been otherwise disposed of when about to be con- 
tracted for. In such instances it was necessary to purchase the 
needed material in the ordinary way from commercial firms. Un- 
precedented delays occurred also on account of difficulties in trans- 
porting materials to the seaboard, congestion in the harbors in the 
United States, and delays to shipping on accomit of labor difficulties. 

On June 30, 1920, the state of completion at Fort Clayton (Mira- 
flores) was as follows: JiW buildings 100 per cent except headquarters, 
which was 85 per cent complete; one battalion barracks, 85 per cent 



G THE PANAMA CANAL. 

complete; one battalion barracks, 70 per cent complete; and at 
Fort Davis (New Gatun), all buildings were 100 per cent complete 
except one 2-family captain's set, 84 per cent complete; one 2-family 
sot, 50 per cent; one 4-family lieutenant's set, 90 per cent; and one 
4-family lieutenant's set, 80 per cent complete; headquarters build- 
ing, 95 per cent complete; one battalion barracks 70 per cent, and 
one battalion barracks 60 per cent complete. 

At the naval submarine base and air station, work was continued 
on projects for which allotments have been made by the Navy 
Department. Total expenditures during the year for the submarine 
base were $147,317, and for the naval air station $91,919. 

Work at the vVrmy aviation base under an allotment from Army 
appropriations was continued; total expenditures during the year 
being $66,954. 

At Fort Sherman new work authorized under an allotment from 
Army appropriations for barracks and quarters was completed at a 
total expenditure of $125,715.10. A new wharf was completed at 
a cost of $25,501.08. 

At the new silver townsite at Mount Hope work was begun on the 
construction of thirty-nine 1 2-family frame quarters and ten 32-room 
frame bachelor quarters. At the end of the year the project was 54 
per cent complete. A commissary building authorized for this 
community was under construction and was 75 per cent complete 
at the end of the year. 

This division was placed in charge of the erection of a 100-foot 
lighthouse at the channel end of the east breakwater, Cristobal 
Harbor. Contract was awarded for the superstructure on October 8, 
1919, at a price of $6,500 delivered at Colon. The contractor's 
drawings were received on February 3, 1920, giving the dimensions 
of the base of the tower and sufficient data for computing the loads 
on the base. The foundation consists of 23 feet 7 inches square 
reinforced concrete deck design, supported by 12 steel pipe piles, 
3 at each corner, driven to rock. After driving the piles were filled 
with concrete. The construction of the foundation was completed 
on June 22, and the erection of the superstructure will proceed upon 
the arrival of its component parts on the Isthmus. 

From funds made available by congressional appropriation, work 
was begun on the construction of a 60-ton daily capacity garbage 
incinerator for the Cristobal-Colon district. On July 1 the building 
was practically complete. The equipment was installed and the 
work remaining to be done consisted of placing fire brick lining in 
the combustion chambers and breechings. The building is of rein- 
forced concrete construction, with tile roof, two stories high, and 37 
feet 3 inches by 101 feet 3 inches in horizontal dimensions. On the 
first floor are two 30-ton incinerating units with their accessories. 
The second floor is of reinforced concrete, designed to support a live 
load of 200 pounds per square foot, and will be used for the receiving 
and distribution of garbage for incineration. The garbage will be 
delivered on motor trucks with removable steel bodies of 2^ yards 
capacity. An overhead electric crane will lift the bodies from the 
trucks and dump them directly into the incinerator hopper or in the 
proper place on the floor until tlie furnace conditions warrant charg- 
mg. The estimated cost of the project is $113,000. 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. i 

A combined mechanical shop and storehouse was authorized for 
construction in the immediate vicinity of the Cristobal docks. In 
the shop will be handled the increasing amount of minor repairs to 
commercial ships and others lying at the docks, and the storehouse 
will be used for ships' stores where they will be readily accessible, as 
required, for sale to ships at the docks. The shops area is 76 by 113 
feet, and the storeroom 76 by 125 feet; the end of the building 
designed for a storehouse will be two stories high. The estimated 
cost of the building is $90,000 and on July 1, 1920, it was 52 per cent 
complete. 

The old Panama Kailroad stables in Colon, constructed in 1908, 
were demolished for sanitary reasons, and a new building was au- 
thorized in a section of Colon set apart for such purposes, at an esti- 
mated cost of $142,000. Work proceeded on the construction of the 
new stables during the year and the buildings were 84 per cent com- 
plete at the end of the year. 

The old Royal Mail pier at Colon was demolished by virtue of a 
sanitary regulation of November 11, 1913, which required the demoli- 
tion of all nonrat-proof piers by January 1, 1919. The property was 
acquired by the Panama Railroad Company, and on the iron sub- 
structure, which remained intact, a new fireproof and rat-proof 
structure was built 60 by 400 feet for the accommodation of small 
coastwise and native craft. The reinforced concrete floor slab is 
designed for a live load of 175 pounds per square foot over the entire 
structure, covered with a roof built of material salvaged from the old 
Panama Railroad Pier No. 2. Water lines were installed for fire 
protection and for water supply to ships. The work was completed 
at a total cost of $38,247.70. 

Under work request from the supply department construction was 
begun of two reinforced concrete oil tanks, 55,000 barrels capacity 
each, one at Mount Hope and one at La Boca. The estimated cost 
of the tanks is $55,000 each. On July 1, 1920, the Mount Hope 
tank was 98 per cent complete and the La Boca tank 60 per cent 
complete. 

In addition to the above, the building division performed various 
minor items of work for the Canal; and for individuals and companies 
the following work was performed : The construction of a community- 
house for the National Catholic War Council, at Balboa, at an esti- 
mated cost of $85,000, was in progress; an office building and quarters 
for the Ro3'al Mail Steam Packet Company, at Cristobal, was under 
construction at an estimated cost of $275,000; and bachelor quarters 
and an office building for the Central and South American Cables 
Company was completed. 

The operations of the building division are described in further 
detail in Appendix A. 

Locks Operation and Maintenance. 

On July 25, 1919, the largest American ships that have transited 
the canal were passed through the locks ; they were the dreadnaughts 
New Mexico and Mississippi, each of 32,000 tons displacement, 624 
feet long and 97 feet 4^ inches beam. As the locks are 110 feet wide, 
there was in each case' a clearance of 6 feet 3i inches on either side, 



8 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

with the vessel centered in the locks. No difficulties were expe- 
rienced during the passage. 

The British cruiser Renown, which passed through the Canal on 
March, 30, 1920, is the largest ship to have transited the Canal to 
date, altliough her beam is 6 feet less than that of the New Mexico 
and Mississippi. She has a length of 795 feet and a displacement of 
33,379 tons. 

There was a total of 8,149 lockages during the year, of which 2,559 
were at Gatun, 2,859 at Pedro Miguel, and 2,731 at Miraflores.f^A 
total of 2,534 commercial vessels were locked through at Gatun, 
2,527 at Pedro Miguel, and 2,528 at Miraflores. Six hundred and 
fourteen vessels of all descriptions, pertaining to the Canal and Army 
and Navy, for which no tolls were paid, passed through Gatun locks; 
1,003 through Pedro Miguel locks, and 978 through Miraflores locks. 

For purposes of inspection and repair, locks were out of commission 
during the year as follows: At Miraflores, east chamber, from Decem- 
ber 12, to January 31 ; west chamber, from February 2, to February 7; 
at Pedro Miguel, west chamber, from February 12 to MarchJ'27. 
During these periods the rising stem valves at Miraflores and Pedro 
Miguel locks were removed and completely overhauled. Considera- 
ble evidence of the action of the teredo was found in the submerged 
hardwood valve fittings and gate sills, requiring replacement of the 
parts aft'ected. The wearing pads and roller trains of the rising stem 
valves were found to be worn sufficiently to require their replace- 
ment at their next period of overhauling. The maintenance of the 
protective coating of the submerged portion of the lock gates was 
continued. None of the chambers of the Gatun locks were un- 
watered during the year, and with the exception of the overhauling 
of the 12 intermediate valves and 24 roller trains nothing but the 
usual work was done. 

The work of the operation and maintenance of the locks is described 
in detail in the report of the engineer of maintenance, Appendix A. 

Electrical Division. 

This division is charged with the maintenance and operation of 
the electric generating stations, substations, transVnission lines, and 
power distributing systems; maintenance of the lighting systems of 
the Canal Zone; maintenance of telephones and telegraphs, fire alarm 
and railway signal systems, and railway interlocking plant, and 
installation and maintenance of all new electrical equipment required 
by the Canal, the railroad, the Army and Navy posts, and such com- 
mercial vessels as require electrical work while transiting the Canal. 
The division remains in the charge of Mr. Walter L. Hersh as elec- 
trical engineer. 

The total expenditures of the division for the year were SI, 700,000, 
of which 46 per cent was for work and current for other departments 
of the Canal, 24 per cent for work and power for the railroad, 10 per 
cent for work performed for outside interests, 9 per cent for improve- 
ments in the power system, and 6 per cent for exterior electrical work 
at the new Army posts at Fort Clayton and Fort Davis; 1-V per cent 
for work for other departments of the Government, and the balance 
of 3^ per cent covers stock of materials, equipment purchased, and 
work in progress awaiting completion and rendering of bills. 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 9' 

The major equipments of the power system remained im changed 
dm-ing the year. Due to the failure of a 2,200-6,600-volt auto trans- 
former of unit No. 2, Gatun hydroelectric station, a complete set 
of new coils for this transformer was ordered. Pending the delivery 
of the new coils No. 2 generator has been placed directly on the 
2,200-Yolt service and is operating at about three-quarters capacity. 

At the Cristobal substation two 2,200-volt feeder equipments were 
installed, one as a distribution feeder to the new silver townsite at 
Mount Hope and the other to relieve the existing feeders to the 
Cristobal docks to provide power for the new small machine repair 
shop at the docks. 

At Gatmi substation a new 300 KVA 60,000-volt testing trans- 
former was installed for applying high potential tests to the trans- 
mission line. A 30-ton motor-operated chain hoist was installed 
preparatory to the handling and installing of an 8,400 KVA 44,000- 
6,600-volt transformer on requisition for this substation. 

The average combined generator output of the power system for 
the year was 5,382,750 KWH per month, as compared with 4,725,637 
KWH per month last A^ear. A monthly average of 4,608,341 KWH 
was transmitted and distributed to all power consumers, with a 
monthly average of 3,955,607 KWH last year. 

On account of the abnormal dry season, extending until the middle 
of May, it was found advisable to conserve the water supply stored 
in Gatun Lake by relieving the hydroelectric station of a load ranging 
from 3,000 to 4,000 KW. During this period this load was carried 
by the steam power plant at Miraflores, which generated 8,234,380 
KWH. During the remaining nine months Miraflores plant was 
maintained on the usual basis of stand-by service. 

There were from all causes 11 interruptions in the service of the 
transmission line, as compared with 49 last year. There was only 1 
interruption chargeable to insulator failure, as compared with 32 last 
year. This improvement is attributed to the additional disk installed 
to all insulator strings of the transmission line, as mentioned in the 
report of last year. 

The average cost of electric power distributed for the year was 9.421 
mills per KWH, and the average cost of distributed lighting current, 
including lamp renewals, was 13.277 mills per KWH. The corre- 
sponding figures for last year were 8.097 mills for power and 12.963 
miUs for lighting. 

During the year 999 telephones were installed and 636 removed, 
leaving a total of 3,330 telephones in service on June 30, 1920, a net 
increase of 363 telephones in the year. The average number of tele- 
phone calls during the eight-hour business day was 28,900, as com- 
pared with 22,630 for last year. A total of 15,1 14 feet of lead-covered, 
paper-insulated telephone cable of all sizes was installed, resulting 
in a total installation of 642,448 feet of telephone cable in service on 
June 30, 1920. 

There were no failures in alarm apparatus during the year, and 27 
alarms were turned in. Two new fire-alarm boxes were installed on 
Pier No. 6, Cristobal. There were no material changes in the railway 
signal installation during the year. There were 2,262,937 registered 
arm movements, with 149 failures, as compared with 2,084,908 arm 
movements and 97 failures during last year. 



10 THE PAi^AMA CANAL. 

At the electrical repair sliop 307 armatures, motors, and generators 
"Were rewound; 131 transform ei"s and miscellaneous coils were re- 
newed; 156 magnetos and fan motors were rewound or repaired; 62 
electrical appliances were repaired; 148 switchboards and panels 
were manufactured, and 180 miscellaneous other repair jobs were 
done. The forces of the electrical division handled 361 jobs of 
marine electrical work on ships at Cristobal and 416 at Balboa. 
The more important items of this work included the complete rewiring, 
OTcrhauling, or additions to the electrical installations aboard the 
steamships Onstohal, Acafutla, Ansaldo, San Giorgio, Salavernj, Paita, 
Circassian Prince, Azov, Ardmore, and the Peruvian cruiser Lima. 

For further details of the work of the electrical division see report 
of the electrical engineer, Appendix A. 

Municipal Division. 

The work of this division continued under the charge of Mr. D. E. 
Wright, as municipal engineer, under the supervision of the engineer 
of maintenance. The work performed included the operation and 
maintenance of water reservoirs, pumping stations, filtration plants, 
and the maintenance and repair of municipal improvements in the 
Canal Zone and in the cities of Panama and Colon. 

Miscellaneous municipal construction work for the Canal, the rail- 
road, the Army and Navy, and for individuals and companies, 
included the following principal items: Necessary surveys for new 
townsite projects, including the layout and design for water, sewers, 
streets, and sidewalks; the maintenance of all roads, water-pumping 
stations, purification plants and pipe lines, and such municipal 
construction work as was required within the Canal Zone and cities 
of Panama and Colon. The principal items of new construction work 
included municipal engineering work for the new Army posts at Fort 
Clayton and Fort Davis; the development and placing in municipal 
order of the extension of the city of Colon, providing additional 99 
building lots for residential purposes for individual residents of 
Colon and for Canal employees; the new town of Mount Hope for 
occupation by silver employees of the Panama Railroad at the docks 
and coaling stations; the construction of a concrete road with an 
asphalt wearing surface from the lumber shed in Balboa to Diablo 
Hill; the resurfacing and oiling of the Paraiso-Gamboa macadam 
road; street extensions for new buildings of the Army posts at Fort 
Sherman, with necessary water and sewer connections; the demo- 
lition of the Calidonia bridge over the Panama Railroad tracks in 
Panama and constructing a grade crossing to replace it; the repairing 
of roads in Fort Amador and Corozal; miscellaneous work for the 
United States Navy at Coco Solo, consisting of construction of sea 
wall, sanitary ditches, baseball park, concrete sidewalks, etc.; the 
development of block 54, Colon, as a warehouse site; construction 
of concrete road from the new cold-storage ])lant to the Margarita- 
Mount Hope Road; the extension of the concrete road to Pier No. 
6; and a large amount of miscellaneous work for The Panama Canal, 
the Panama Railroad, and various business concerns of Panama 
and Colon. The amounts expended on this work are as follows: 
Army post. Fort Clayton, $355,829.12; Army post. Fort Davis, 
$329,786.05; silver townsite, Mount Hope, $115,788.62; concrete road 



REPOr.T OF THE GOVEr.XOR. 11 

Balboa to Diablo Hill, $34,452.44; resurfacing Paraiso-Gamboa 
road, $22,713.22; roads, streets, sidewalks, etc.. Fort Sherman, 
$9,881.25; Calidonia bridge crossing, $36,594.87; miscellaneous 
municipal Nvork for United States Army, $39,659.61; miscellaneous 
municipal Avork for United States Navy, $38,446.18; development 
of block 54 in Colon, $38,537.43; road from cold-storage plant, 
Mount Hope, $39,150.11; extension of road to Pier 6, $12,779.63; 
miscellaneous municipal work for the Panama Canal departments 
and Panama Railroad, $159,893.22; outsiders, $20,232.43; municipal 
engineering work, New Cristobal, $91,488.44; and municipal work 
between Seventh and Ninth and G and K Streets, Colon, $115,685.67. 

The supplying of water and the maintenance of sewer systems and 
streets in the cities of Panama and Colon was continued. The total 
expenditures in these two cities for routine maintenance work was 
SI 84,453. 92. Work was continued on enlargement of storm sewer 
drains in the city of Panama, $112,177.84 being spent. 

The total number of gallons of water pumped at the various pump- 
ing stations was as follows: Gamboa, 3,895,630,000; Miraflores, 
423,790,000; Balboa, 2,790,202,000; Paraiso, 74,640,000; Cucaracha, 
176,513,000; Mount Hope, 2,157,686,000; Agua Clara, 427,714,000; 
Frijoles, 11,620,000; and Monte Lirio, 3,264,000. The divisional 
cost of water delivered in the several districts was as follows per 1,000 
gallons: Ancon-Balboa, $0.07; Miraflores, $0.06; Pedro Miguel, $0.07; 
Paraiso, $0.07; Gamboa, $0.08; Gatun, $0.14; and Cristobal, $0.07. 
These costs include filtration, analysis, and treatment. The sales of 
water to vessels were as follows: Cristobal, 2,215 vessels, 110,825,282 
gallons; Balboa, 1,438 vessels, 35,289,250 gallons. The water con- 
sumption in the city of Panama for the year was 1,026,440,000 
gallons, and in Colon the consumption was 625,371,800 gallons. 

For further details of municipal engineering work see report of the 
municipal engineer. Appendix A. 

Meteorology and Hydrography. 

The section continued in the charge of Mr. R. Z. Kirkpatrick, chief 
hydrographer, reporting to the engineer of maintenance. All of the 
meteorological stations as reported for last year have been continued 
in operation and additional stations were established as follows: A 
standard rain gauge was installed at La Palma in December, 1919, 
operated by the naval radio station at that point; at Divala, Province 
of Chiriqui; Mariato, Province of Veraguas; and at Mandinga Bay, 
Province of Colon, all in the Republic of Panama, during the dry 
season of 1920. These stations are not operated at the expense of 
The Panama Canal. 

For the calendar year 1919 the rainfall was below normal at all sta- 
tions in the Canal Zone and vicinity, except Cape Mala, Taboga, Chili- 
brillo, and Bocas del Toro. The greatest deficiency was 32.14 at 
Brazos Brook. At most stations October was the month of heaviest 
rainfall and March the month of lightest rainfall. The average annual 
rainfall in the Pacific section was 63.39 inches: in the Central section, 
79.11 inches; and in the Atlantic section 109.89 inches. The greatest 
precipitation recorded in any one day was 9.09 inches at Porto Bello 
on August 23, 1919. The four months dry season rainfall for the 
fiscal year 1920 is the lowest of record since American occupation 



12 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

in 1904, and the dry season conditions were prolonged until the 
middle of Ma}', a full month longer than usual. The rainfall for the 
first six months of the calendar year 1920 was below normal tlu^ough- 
out the Canal Zone and vicinit}^, the difference being most pronounced 
in the Atlantic section. 

The average air temperature for the year was above normal. For 
the calendar year 1919 the maximum temperature recorded was 94° 
F., which occurred at Balboa Heights on February 6 and at Gamboa 
on April 11, and the minimum temperature recorded was 61° F., at 
Alhajuela on ISIarch 22. 

The annual wind movement in the Canal Zone for the calendar 
3^ear 1919 was above normal; northwest, north, and northeast winds 
prevailed at all stations. The maximum wind velocity recorded for 
the year was 50 miles per hour, at Gamboa on September 26, and at 
Gatun on June 17. During the calendar year 1919 the evaporation 
over the surface of Gatun Lake was below the average of eight 
years. During the first six months of 1920 the evaporation was 
above normal, due to the unusual length and intensit}^ of the dry 
season. The usual conditions of frequent night and early morning 
fogginess prevailed at the interior stations during the rainy season, 
and as usual all fogs observed were dissipated by 8.30 a. m. 

There were 33 seismic disturbances during the fiscal year 1920; all 
were of moderate intensity and no damage was done to Canal struc- 
tures. 

For the calendar year 1919 the total yield of the Gatun Lake 
watershed was 17 per cent below normal, the average yield being 
5,225 c. f. s., as compared with a nine-year average of 6,267 c. f. s. 
The maximum monthly average yield was 1,053 c. f. s. in October, 
and the minimum was 952 c. f. s. in March. The actual total yield 
for the calendar year 1919 was 164.79 billion cubic feet, of which 36 
per cent was run-off above Alhajuela, 44 per cent from land area 
below Alhajuela, and 20 per cent direct rainfall on Gatun Lake 
surface. Of the total yields, 14 per cent, or 22.108 billion cubic feet, 
were lost by evaporation from the lake surface; 11 per cent, or 
18.246 billion cubic feet, were consumed in lockages; 28 per cent, 
or 46.34 billion cubic feet, were consumed at the hydroelectric plant 
at Gatun; 46 per cent, or 76.044 billion cubic feet, were discharged 
over the spillways, and 1 per cent, or 1.89 billion cubic feet, were 
consumed at the water pumping stations, in leakages, and other 
losses. 

At the beginning, on December 16, 1919, of the 1919-20 dry season, 
Gatun Lake was at its maximum stage of 87 feet. On account of 
the abnormal intensity and length of this dry season and of the 
increased consumption of water due to increased traffic in the Canal, 
the lake on May 28, 1920, soon after the close of the dry season, had 
fallen to elevation 81.77. On account of the rate of fall of the lake, 
and of the condition of Cucaracha slide, it was determined to conserve 
water by reducing the output of the hydroelectric generating plant 
at Gatun by 50 per cent and to supplement the necessary power by 
the operation of the Miraflores steam plant. This was done on 
March 3, and continued to June 3, by which date the lake had begun 
to rise at a sufficient rate to justify the full operation of the Gatun 
hydroelectric plant. If the hydroelectric plant had continued at its 



EEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 13 

normal output without interruption, the hike would have fallen to 
elevation 80.55. 

Nothing in the results following the abnormal dry season of this 
year has indicated the necessity for many years to come, if at all, of 
the creation of an additional reservoir by the construction of the 
Alhajuela dam. With the traffic developed to the capacity of the 
Canal and with the hydroelectric plant at Gatun operated at its 
maximum ultimate capacity, it will always be necessary to waste 
water over the spillways during the rainy season. During a part of 
abnormal dry seasons it will probably be necessary to conserve water, 
as was done from March to June of this year, by reducing the output 
of the hydroelectric plant at Gatun and by generating the deficiency 
in the operation of the steam plant at Miraflores. As the other work 
of the surveys office permits, additional surveys are being made of 
the upper Chagres Valley for the purpose of accumulating data for 
estimating the volume of water that may be impounded above Alha- 
juela, if in the future it becomes apparent that the additional reser- 
voir is advantageous. 

Reference is made to Appendix A for other details. 

Section of Surveys. 

Mr. O. E. Malsbury continued as assistant engineer in charge of 
this section, reporting to the engineer of maintenance. The section 
conducted all surveys for the land office of the Canal and Panama 
Railroad and maintained the establishment of Canal Zone monu- 
ments, triangulation stations, and bench marks. It also made sur- 
veys and prepared maps for the Army and Navy and for the joint 
land commission, as required. Corner and grade stakes were set on 
43 lots in the city of Colon, on 1 lot in Cristobal, and on block 23 in 
the city of Panama. 

Observation at points on Gatun dam and of the south approach 
walls at Gatun were continued, indicating normal conditions. The 
entire 5-mile limit line of the east side of the Canal Zone was cleared 
and marked with 168 extra monuments. On the west side of the 
Canal the 5-mile limit line between the Canal Zone and the Republic 
of Panama was cleared and marked with 10 extra monuments, 

A new triangulation station was established in the vicinity of Fort 
Clayton Military Reservation, and four new stations were established 
in the vicinity of upper Chagres River on which to tie the survey of 
the Alhajuela Basin. Various surveys were made for the supply 
department, health department, and electrical division, as described 
in the appendix. Boundary lines of military and naval reservations 
in the Canal Zone were established and maintained. 

For further details see Appendix A. 

Office Engineer. 

This work continued in the charge of Mr. C. J. Embree, under the 
supervision of the engineer of maintenance, and included the engi- 
neering, architectural, and miscellaneous design work for all divisions 
of the Canal except the mechanical division. 

There was a total of 685 working drawings issued, of which the 
most important were for the building division and electrical division. 



14 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

The office issued during the year 224,670 square feet of blue prints^ 
19,653 square feet of white prints, and 8,715 square feet of brown 
prints, at an average cost of IJ cents per square foot. 

Dredging Division. 

This division continued in charge of Mr. J. M. Pratt, superintend- 
ent of dredging, under the direction of the engineer of maintenance. 
It was charged with the maintenance of the Uanal prism and of the 
approach channels to the docks and coaling plants at the Canal 
entrances, and with the sand and gravel production from the bed of 
the Chagres River. 

The total amount of material of all kinds excavated by the dredg- 
ing plant was 4,750,686 cubic yards, at an average cost of 34J cents 
per cubic yard. Of the material excavated, 3,333,961 cubic yards 
were earth and 1,416,725 cubic yards were of rock. Except for 120,- 
676 cubic yards of sand and gravel production, the cost just stated 
includes the transportation and dumping. For the sand and gravel 
production, costs include delivery alongside the gravel dock at Gam- 
boa. A total of 3,711,810 cubic yards was removed from the limits 
of the Canal prism, distributed geographically as follows: From 
Atlantic Ocean to Gatun, 0; from Gatun to Gamboa, 7,400 cubic 
yards; from Gamboa to Pedro Miguel, 2,121,710 cubic yards; from 
^iiraflores Lake, 0; and from Miraflores to Pacific Ocean, 1,582,700 
cubic yards. Of these amounts all were chargeable to maintenance 
except 17,800 cubic yards chargeable to construction between Mira- 
flores and the Pacific Ocean. Within the limits of the Canal prism 
there remained on June 30, 1920, to be removed 155,400 cubic yards 
chargeable to construction and 3,286,900 cubic yards chargeable to 
maintenance. 

The large amount of dredging done in Gaillard Cut section was due 
to the renewed activity of Cucaracha slide, 77 per cent of the total 
yardage reported in this section having been removed from that 
obstruction. The slides at Culebra were quiescent throughout the 
year, except for a small movement of the East Culebra slide in the 
latter part of October, 1919, requiring the excavation of 272,000 
cubic yards from October 16 to December 27. 

In August, 1916, a movement in the old slide area at Cucaracha 
closed the Canal to traffic for a period of eight days. Equilibrium 
was restored after the removal of 1,054,757 cubic yards from the 
Canal prism and the excavation of a small basin in the bank of the 
Canal. Within the area of the disturbance, but not affected by it, 
was a high ledge of rock extending diagonally from a massive hard 
rock promontory, locally called "Purple rock," at the edge of the 
Canal, to Gold Hill, at a point 1,200 feet from the Canal. By its 
resistance this ledge retained and prevented the motion of the mass 
of material beliind it. The first indication of new disturbance was a 
surface movement of the mass behind the rock ledge that began 
during the heavy rainfall of October, 1919, and wliich forced material 
over the ledge and into the Canal. Tliis condition continued without 
serious results until February 21, 1920, when a large general move- 
ment occurred carrying huge masses of earth and rock into the Canal 
prism and obstructing the channel, except for small draft ships. 
The operations of the large dipper dredges accomplished the removal 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 15 

of the obstructions at a sufficient rate to keep the Canal open to all 
traffic with the exception of occasional delays in February, March, 
and April. Twenty-seven ships were delayed an average of two days, 
the maximum delay to any ship being four days. By June 12, 1920, 
the channel had been restored to full dimensions and at the date of 
this report a basin has been created by excavating the broken bank 
throughout the full length of the slide and for an average width of 
250 feet outside the limits of the Canal. 

Between February 21, the date of the first obstruction, and Sep- 
tember 1 a total of 1,890,800 cubic yards was removed by the dredges, 
at an average cost, including transportation and dumping of the 
dredged material, of 37^ cents per cubic yard. 

When stability was secured after the movement of 1916, it was 
expected that no more serious difficulty would be experienced at 
Cucaracha, and this expectation was strengthened by three years of 
quiescence. The renewed activity was obviously due to the failure 
of the rock ledge referred to above, which finally yielded under the 
pressure of the material behind it and left that material free to move 
toward the Canal. 

The slide at Cucaracha has always been free from one of the diffi- 
cult featm-cs of the slides at Culebra, which closed the Canal in 
1915-16. At the latter place the disturbance extended to a depth 
below the level of the bottom of the Canal and shoals were formed by 
the upheaval of the bottom. At Cucaracha the bottom has remained 
undisturbed, and we have had to handle only the material that 
actually moved from the banks. The present situation is that all 
obstructions have been removed, the motion is much retarded, and 
a new period of stability is approaching. For several months to 
come it may be necessar^r to operate a di'edge to keep pace with the 
movement, but the creation of a basin permits the work to be done 
outside the limits of the Canal prism, and therefore without inter- 
ference with traffic. As the failure of the rock ledge referred to 
above has removed the resistance to motion of the broken masses of 
earth and rock \\TLthin the limits of this extensive break in the bank 
more than one-half mile from the Canal, it is probable that intermit- 
tent movements will occur until stability is attained, and that when 
attained the stability •wdll be permanent. 

On account of the large amount of material removed from the 
slide, it is not probable that sudden movements of large masses "v^dll 
again occur, or that further movements will be more rapid than the 
rate of removal by the dredges. 

Plates Nos. 8 and 10 show the conditions existing at the worst 
stage of the slides, and plates Nos. 9 and 11 the present conditions. 

The plant operated by the dredging division continued as reported 
last year, except that the large seagoing ladder dredge Corozal was 
sold to the United States Engineering Office, Philadelphia, and 
delivered to representatives of that office on November 7, 1919. 
Inspections were made from time to time of the slide areas in Gaillard 
Cut with special reference to drainage conditions and evidence of 
lack of stability. Where necessary, ditches were excavated and 
banks sloped by the hydi*aulic gi'aders to facilitate the drainage of 
the banks. The usual work of destruction of water hyacinths was 
continued. During the year 2,500,000 plants were pulled and 



16 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

destroyed, and 403,500 square yards were cleared by spraying with 
an arsenic solution. 

For further details of dredging division operations, see Appendix A. 

MARINE DIVISION. 

Capt. L. R. Sargent, United States Navy, remained in charge of 
this division until April 15, 1920, when he was relieved from duty 
with the Canal by orders from the Navy Department; he was suc- 
ceeded by Capt. E. P. Jessop, United States Nav}^. 

The floating equipment was increased during the year by the return 
of the Canal tugs La Boca and Mirajiores, which had been loaned to 
the War Department for service during the war, and by the acqui- 
sition from the Navy Department, for use and custody of the Canal, 
of the U. S. S. Favorite, a vessel of 500 tons dead-weight, for service 
^s a lighthouse tender and as a salvaging vessel. The Favorite takes 
the place of an old French clapet that has been used as a lighthouse 
tender and that has been worn out in the service. 

A two-story concrete building located at Gatun was completed 
and is occupied as a combined storehouse, repair and office building 
for the lighthouse subdivision. 

The board of local inspectors, under the supervision of the marine 
superintendent, made the prescribed semiannual inspections of all 
floating equipment of the Canal and Panama Railroad, and, in 
addition, inspected in dry dock 42 hulls of commercial ships and 
Canal and railroad plant. Inspections and tests were made of 67 
boilers in floating equipment, 60 on Canal and railroad plant, and 7 
on vessels belonging to the United States Army. Licenses were 
issued to 10 pilots, 13 masters, 21 mates, 30 engineers, and 126 
navigators of motor boats. 

A total of 2,478 commercial vessels made the transit of the Canal, 
1,180 from the Atlantic to the Pacific and 1,298 in the reverse direc- 
tion. Commercial cargo carried tlu'ough the Canal amounted to 
9,374,499 tons, of which 4,092,516 tons were from the Atlantic to 
the Pacific and 5,281,983 from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Thi*ee 
hundred and twenty-nine ships, with a cargo tonnage of 1,129,616, 
passed through the Canal in ballast; 105, with a tonnage of 458,383, 
were northbound, and 224, with a tonnage of 671,233, were south- 
bound. United States Government vessels transiting the Canal free 
of tolls aggregated 266, of which 51 were northbound and 215 south- 
bound. Of these 218 pertained to the Unit'fed States Navy, 18 to 
the Army, and 30 were merchant ships with naval cargo. The ton- 
nage transported by these ships amounted to 365,898, of which 
150,814 tons were in naval vessels, 27,275 in Ai-my vessels, and 
187,809 tons were transported in merchant vessels under control of 
the Navy. Five naval vessels of other nations, totaling 69,536 tons 
displacement, transited the Canal, The traffic for the year showed 
an increase as compared with the preceding year, in vessels, tonnage, 
and cargo, amounting, respectively, to 22.37 per cent, 39.38 per cent, 
and 36.31 per cent. The number of commercial vessels transiting 
the Canal was 16.34 per cent above all previous yearly records. The 
distribution as to nationalities of the ships transiting the Canal during 
the year was as follows : United States, 1,129 ; British, 753 ; Japanese, 
118; Norwegian, 106; Chilean, 79; Peruvian, 75; French, 60; Span- 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 17 

ish, 41; Dutch, 29; Italian, 26; Swedish, 19; German, 17; Danish, 9; 
Panamanian, 4; BraziHan, 3; Chinese, Portuguese, and Russian, 2 
each; Belgian, Colombian, Costa Rican, and Uruguayan, 1 each. 
For further details attention is invited to Appendix B. 

MECHANICAL DIVISION. 

The work of this division continued in the charge of Commander 
E. G. Kintner, United States Navy, as superintendent. The principal 
changes and additions to plants included the installation at Balboa 
shops of a reclaiming roll for rerolling miscellaneous steel and iron 
scrap into round and rectangular section rods and bars; the roofing 
over of the space between buildings 2 and 3, Balboa shops, to relieve 
the congestion of the pipe shojD ; the installation of a large horizontal 
boring mill at the Balboa shops ; and the construction (in progress) of 
a light repair shop adjacent to the commercial piers in Cristobal to 
facilitate repairs to ships at those piers. 

The average force employed in the shops was 2,869 per month, 
1,002 gold and 1,867 silver employees, as compared with correspond- 
mg averages of 696 gold and 1,658 silver employees for last year. 

The value of work performed was §6,454,219, of which 59.87 per 
cent was marine work, 19.73 per cent railroad work, 12.17 per cent 
miscellaneous, and 8.23 per cent manufacturing. Of the total work 
performed 35.09 per cent was for the Canal, 43.38 per cent for indi- 
viduals and companies, 17.16 per cent for the Panama Railroad, and 
4.37 per cent for Government departments. 

At the Balboa dry dock 16 vessels were docked pertaining to the 
United States Army and Navy, 33 pertaining to The Panama Canal, 
and 34 belonging to outside commercial interests. At the Cristobal 
dry dock corresponding figures were 22 ships belonging to the Army 
and Navy, 20 to the Canal, and 43 to outside commercial interests. 
The total number of vessels, other than tugs, barges, and dredges, on 
which work was done was 1,064 — 422 at Balboa shops and 642 at the 
Cristobal shops. 

The principal items of work at the Balboa shops include : Comple- 
tion of overhaul and repairs to ex-German merchant steamers Uarda 
(renamed Salaverry) and Anuhis (renamed Paita) ; the former was 
delivered for operation on July 14 and the latter on October 6, 1919, 
the Anuhis having been considerably delayed by nondelivery of parts 
from the United States, held up by strikes; completion of the repairs 
and alterations to the steamship Cristobal, of the Panama Railroad 
Steamship Line, the work including not only a thorough overhaul but 
also very extensive alterations. The vessel was changed from a coal 
burner to an oil burner; the accommodations for officers and crew 
were rebuilt; the passenger space was enthely changed and greatly 
enlarged, as was also the cold-storage system. The overhaul in- 
cluded installation of new boilei-s, refitting of main engines and practi- 
cally all auxiliaries in the ship. The steamship Azov was given a 
general overhaul of machinery and repairs in diy dock to the hull, 
including renewal of about 25 shell plates, numerous frames, and the 
lower half of the stem. The U. S. S. Melville, after arriving at this 
plant in tow in a disabled condition, with boilers out of commission, 
had installed modified furnace fronts and certain changes in her oil- 
8847—20 2 



18 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

burning sj^stem. The U. S. battleship Bliode Island was placed in 
dry dock on account of a broken outside coupling. Repairs were 
made to the strut fastenings which had been loosened ; new coupling 
and new propeller shaft were made from rough machined spares car- 
ried by the vessel. The Navy Department ordered this vessel to 
proceed to Mare Island Navy Yard under one engine, when it was 
found, after removal of the stern tube shaft to the shop, that it was 
cracked; there was no material on the Isthmus available for the 
manufacture of tliis part. The Peruvian cruiser Lima received ex- 
tensive repaks, particularly to the boilers and hull structure in the 
vicinity of the machinery spaces, rudder, and steering gear. A new 
radio house was constructed; also a new pilot house. Thesteamship 
Acajutla, belonging to the Pacific Steam Navigation Company, was 
altered from coal bm'ning to oil burning, and received extensive re- 
pairs to her hull and machinery. The United States submarines, sta- 
tioned at Coco Solo were dry-docked and given miscellaneous repairs. 
The steamsliip Oloclcson (owned by the United States Shipping Board), 
which had been sunk near the Pacific entrance to the Canal to extin- 
guish a fire in the cargo of gasoline, was salvaged. Dredges, scows, 
and tugs of the dredging division were overhauled and repau-ed. On 
account of the slides which took place this year the amount of these 
repairs was considerably increased. Four new 61-foot steel-frame 
passenger coaches were completed m the car shop and put into active 
service. These cars are notable on account of being trimmed with 
caoba blanca, a native wood; they were finished in the natural color. 
Twenty-five 40-ton flat cars were rebuilt for the Alaskan Engineering 
Commission. 

The principal items of work at the Cristobal shops included: The 
steamship Culehra received extensive repairs and alterations in con- 
nection with restoring her from her condition as a cattle carrier to 
her previous condition as a seagoing dredge; the vessel was moved 
to Balboa shops on April 6, 1920, for the completion of the work on 
account of the many interruptions at Cristobal; salvage of the steam- 
ship Marne (o\vned by the U. S. Shipping Board). This vessel was 
raised after being sunk in Cristobal Harbor to extinguish a fire in the 
cargo of benzine. The vessel caught fire a second time and sank in 
the harbor on account of an explosion; she was again raised and 
unloaded. 

For further details of the operations of the mechanical division 
see Appendix C. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

The operations of this department continued under the charge of 
Mr. R. K. Morris, chief quartermaster. 

Labor. — The force for the month of June, 1920, consisted of 4,608 
employees on the gold roll and 17,023 on the silver roll. In June, 
1919, there were 3,290 employees on the gold roll and 17,071 on the 
silver roll. The increase in the gold roll was principally due to the 
operations of the building division in the construction of the Army 
posts and of the mechanical division in the larger rcpau' jobs for 
steamships. There was a slight increase in the gold roll on account 
of the displacement of certain alien employees on the silver roll. 
The maximum number of employees on the silver roll was in February, 



KEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 



19 



when 18.231 were employed, and the minimum number in November, 
when 16,243 were employed. 

Quarters. — ^Applications on file for family quarters, gold employees, 
were 618 on June 30, 1920, as compared with 306 on June 30, 1919. 
On the silver roll there were 747 applications on file on June 30, 1920, 
for family quarters. By arrangement with the War Department, 
the old Canal village of Las Cascadas, which was turned over to the 
Army for occupation by troops in 1910, was turned back to the Canal 
in October, 1919. Sixteen of the quarters suitable for the purpose 
were removed from Las Cascadas and reerected for quarters of gold 
employees in existing Canal towns. The remainder of the buildings 
were made available for rental to a selected class of silver emploj^ees 
temporarily out of work, with allotments of land for their use in 
gardening, poultry raising, and growing of fruit trees to assist in the 
support of themselves and their families. At the end of June, 1920, 
40 families had taken advantage of this opportunity to have a home 
at a nominal cost. 

Transportation facilities. — ^Animal transportation was further re- 
duced and replaced by motor transportation during the year. The 
animals still in the service were used for drawing mowing machines, 
garbage wagons, and material wagons where roads do not permit the 
use of trucks. On June 30, 1920, 29 horses and 143 mules were in 
the transportation service, a reduction of 10 horses and 51 mules 
from the figures of a year ago. The motor vehicles in service on 
June 30, 1920, and for the same date last year are shown in the 
following table: 



Ford cars, A-ton delivery. 

1-ton trucks 

IJ-ton trucks 

3|-ton trucks 

2i-ton trucks (electric). . . 

2-ton trucks 

Ford passenger cars 



1919 



Combination passenger and de- 
livery, changeable 

Hearses 

Ambulances 

Motor cycles 

Buss, l|-ton 



1919 



1920 



In the cattle industry there were in service on June 30, 1920, 208 
horses and 110 mules, corresponding figures for last j^ear being 190 
horses and 137 mules. 

Materials and supplies.- — The total value of materials received 
during the fiscal year was $7,812,258.86, as compared with $7,832,- 
845.61 for the previous year. The value of materials issued from the 
different storehouses was $11,966,308.81, as compared with $12,157,- 
090.24 for the previous year. The value of materials on hand June 
30, 1920, was $5,249,300.15, as against $6,001,451.24 on eJune 30, 
1919. The value of materials of all classes sold from the storehouses 
of the supply department was $3,025,698.18. Sales were made to 
3,265 steamships to the amount of $1,274,556.18, being an increase 
of $97,039.85, as compared with last year. A total of 248,294 requi- 
sitions and foremen's orders was handled, distributed as follows: 
General storehouse, Balboa, 156,415; Cristobal storehouse, 76,243; 
Paraiso storehouse, 15,636. The consumption of cement for the year 
was 158,089 barrels. 



20 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Obsolete material.— Two scrap shears were purchased and installed 
at Mount Hope scrap yard to facilitate the cutting and classifying of 
scrap in order to secure more favorable prices. It is expected that 
all scrap now on hand will be cut up, classified, and sold by December 
1, 1920, at which time the scrap shears will be moved from Mount 
Hope to the general storehouse at Balboa, from which point all 
future scrap operations will be handled. During the year 20,378 
tons of American scrap were sold. 

Fuel-oil tanl's.- — Contract was entered into with the West India Oil 
Company to furnish 300,000 barrels of fuel oil at SI. 12 per barrel, de- 
livered into Panama Canal tanks at Mount Hope, and 700,000 barrels at 
$1.29 per barrel delivered into Canal tanks at Balboa. This contract 
expired on June 30, 1920, but with the privilege of renewal to De- 
cember 31, 1920. In view of the favorable price the Canal exercised 
its option of renewal. Two 55,000-barrel capacity concrete tanks under 
construction during the year, one at Balboa and one at Mount Hope, 
were 90 per cent complete. The total amount of fuel oil handled 
by the Balboa and Mount Hope plants amounted to 5,620,986 barrels, 
including both receipts and issues; 1,195 vessels were fueled during 
the year. The amount of 484,045 gallons of bulk gasoline was ob- 
tained from the purchase of salvaged cargo of the steamship Olockson, 
which was AATCcked by fire in the vicinity of the Pacific entrance to 
the Canal. 

Panama Canal press. — The value of stock on hand at the close of 
the year was $109,605.55, as compared with $98,103.52 for the pre- 
ceding year. The increase was due to additional stock required for 
the printing of commissary coupon books. On account of the high 
price in the United States, it was decided to install a plant for the 
printing of our commissary coupon books, with an estimated saving 
of $30,000 annually. The total value of material issued from the 
printing plant was $158,406.79, as compared with $147,627.39 for the 
previous year. 

Subsistence. — The supply department operated the hotels Tivoli 
andjWashington, Hotel Aspinwall, on Taboga Island, three cafeterias, 
four restaurants, and two lunch rooms for gold employees, and three 
labor messes for silver employees. The line restaurants and cafe- 
terias showed a net loss of $4,755.84, and the labor mess a profit of 
$5,516.84. The Hotel Tivoli was operated at a net profit of $15,763.47, 
and Hotel Washington was operated at a net profit of $24,046.01. 
The patronage at the Tivoli and Washington showed a marked in- 
crease during the dry season on account of increased travel of the 
general public after the removal of travel restrictions caused by the 
war. 

Commissary division. — The general market conditions were ab- 
normal throughout the year, and it was difFicult to secure and main- 
tain an adequate supply of all commodities. There was a reduction 
of stock on hand and in investment in commissary stocks. There 
was an increase in the business done by the bakery, coffee-roasting 

f)lant, Cristobal laundry, ice plant, milk-bottling plant, and industrial 
aboratory. The abattoir, ice-cream plant, sausage factory, and 
Ancon laundry did a decreased volume of business. On account of 
suspension of beef shipments to the Army in the United States, fewer 
cattle were slaughtered than for 1919, but the local consumption was 
greater. The Costa Rican agency, which had been suspended on 



t EEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 21 

account of uncertain transportation facilities in 1919, was reopened 
following the renewal of regular steamship service. This agency 
supplies vegetables and fruits, and occasionally sugar and coffee, in 
better condition and at less price than afforded by the markets of 
the United States. By-products from the abattoir to a total value 
of $589,142.67 were snipped to the United States and there sold. 
During the year a total of 6,256,941 pounds of beef were exported 
to the Army in the United States. The total area cleared for pas- 
tures in the Canal Zone is 46,165 acres. 
For further details see Appendix D. 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT. 

This department continued in the charge of Mr. H. A. A. Smith, as 
auditor. Mr. E. P. Sine resigned his position as collector and was 
succeeded by Mr. T. L. Clear, the former collector, upon his return 
from service overseas in the Inspector General's Department of the 
United States Army, in September, 1919. Mr. J. H. McLean, pay- 
master, resigned on November 15, 1919, and Mr. R. W. Glaw, assist- 
ant paymaster, was promoted to fill the vacancy on January 24, 1920. 

The paymasteo; disbursed a total of $38,426,733.29, of which the 
sum of $15,134,762 was on account of the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany. Employees on the gold roll of The Panama Canal were paid 
$8,391,066.16, and employees on the silver roll $6,505,810.88. The 
sum of $8,395,094.25 was paid on miscellaneous vouchers. Collec- 
tions by pay-roll deductions were $5,191,946.63, of which the sum of 
$4,220,524.88 was collected for coupon books. Of the total collec- 
tions on pay rolls, the sum of $4,948,704.48 was disbursed directly, 
by the paymaster, the balance $243,241.95 being transferred to the 
collector's accounts. A total of $1,224,000 .in cash was imported 
from the United States by the paymaster. The collections repaid to 
appropriations amounted to $14,745,634.31, as compared with 
$10,364,875.07 during the previous year. The sum of $8,848,978.06 
was collected for deposits as miscellaneous receipts. 

For the payment of tolls and bills for supplies and services, there , 
were deposited with the Assistant Treasurer of the United States to 
the credit of the collector $2,287,783.21. Deposits for the same 
purpose made with the collector on the Isthmus amounted to 
$18,631,811.32. The direct deposits with the collector on the Isthmus 
for tolls and other bills show an increase of $6,500,000 over the 
figures of last year, and the deposits with the Assistant Treasurer of 
the United States to the credit of the collector show a decrease of 
over $2,000,000. The total deposits, $20,919,594.53, exceed the 
total for last year by $4,476,220.50. 

Mone}^ order funds to the amount of $1,501,000 were transferred 
to the Postmaster General of the United States in payment of money 
orders drawn on the United States. Collections on account of the 
Panama Railroad Company amounted to $21,532,848.43, an increase 
over last year of $1,191,903.47. The tolls actually collected for 
vessels transiting the Canal amounted to $8,496,633.40. The total 
earned amounted to $8,516,469.80, and the sum of $19,836.40 remain- 
ing unpaid being charges on certain Government vessels that may not 
be finally held liable for the payment of tolls. 



22 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

As a matter of interest it will be stated that the tolls earned for the 
year would have been S9, 955, 754.32 if the Panama Canal rules of 
measurement had been applied in all cases. The total loss to the 
Canal since it was opened to traffic on account of the present legal 
restrictions to the application of the Panama Canal rules of measure- 
ment amounts to $5,109,904.24 to June 30, 1920. Benefits to vessels 
on account of the existing rules of measurement are distributed as 
follows : 



Vessels plnng between American ports 

Vessels pl>-iu5 between American ports and canal ports 

Vessels pljing between American possessions and American ports. 



American. 



$237,956.85 
97, 956. 05 
34, 908. 60 



Foreign. 



§67,881.50 

1,325.90 

43, 495. 75 



These figures, subtracted from $5,109,904,24, give the sum of 
$4,626,379.59 as the amount of saving to vessels engaged in foreign 
trade. 

The total appropriations for the Canal and its immediate adjuncts 
by Congress to June 30, 1920, amount to $467,431,257.41. Deducting 
from this total the amounts appropriated for annual payments to 
the Republic of Panama, $2,500,000, regulating commerce and censor- 
ship of mails, $170,000, fortifications, $34,658,400.81, and for opera- 
tion and maintenance, $50,511,914.68, leaves $379,840,941.92 appro- 
priated for the construction of the Canal and its immediate adjuncts. 
Of the total appropriated for construction, $4,329,898 for colliers and 
coal barges, $2,093,190 for pier No. 6, Cristobal, $300,000 for work on 
the colliers Ulysses and Achilles, and $720,000 for reboilerin^ and 
repairing the steamships Ancon and Cristobal, were specifically ex- 
empted by law as a charge against the amount of the authorized 
bond issue. These being deducted from the total appropriations for 
the construction of the Canal and its immediate adjuncts, gives the 
sum of $372,397,853.92 as chargeable to bond issue, and makes avail- 
able for appropriation within the limit of the cost of the Canal and the 
authorized bond issue the sum of $2,825,302.08. 

Current appropriations. — The cash balance of the current appropria- 
tions for operation and maintenance, sanitation, and civil government, 
and for construction, on June 30, 1920, amounted to $12,347,642.76. 
Including the amount of the accounts receivable and transfer of appro- 
priations to be made in payment for work done and supplies furnished, 
the total of the cash and cash items was $16,325,017.48. The liabilities 
immediately payable, including the amount to be paid the United 
States Shipping Board for the two coal barges, which are now in service, 
amount to $6,004,775.71. The additional ordinary obligations out- 
standing, viz, $3,601,343.84 on outstanding orders, $3,480,460.30 on 
unfilled requisitions, and $2,234,701.77 on allotments for special work, 
make a total of the regular obligations of $15,321,281.82, and leaves 
a balance of $1,003,736.26. This balance is a great deal more than 
ofi'set bv the reserves for repairs ($484,268.74) and by the amount 
due employees for leaves earned ($813,591.01)— a large portion of 
both of which may be required at any time — and by the reserves for 
depreciation on equipment, $2,442,029.86. 

As stated last year, too much stress can not be given to the ne- 
cessity of keeping the appropriations for Canal operations and main- 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 



23 



tenance on a continuing rather than on an annual basis, and to the 
maintenance of an adequate casli balance to carry on the business 
operations. Work for the Army and Navy has been done on a 
very large scale in the past and will continue to be done. Delays 
in payAient seemingly can not bo avoided. This throws a burden 
on Canal funds that must be recognized and provided for. The 
cash balance with which to operate can be provided by a special 
appropriation, or, what is believed to be better and more in keeping 
with the law relative to the business operations of the Canal, by 
considering the reserves for depreciation as direct obligations against 
the appropriations for operation and maintenance. Fluctuations in 
the value of stock on hand directly affect the cash balance, and if 
the value of the stock falls below the amount authorized for invest- 
ment in stock, then the difference must be considered as a direct 
obligation chargeable to the appropriation at any given time. 

The ordinary expenses for operation and maintenance, including 
those of civil government and sanitation, were $6,548,272.43, against 
$6,112,194.77 expended in 1919. The expense of maintaining 
dredging increased from $1,152,188.99 to $1,611,359.78, due to the 
slides in Gaillard Cut. Offsetting the total expense of operation 
and maintenance are the amounts earned as tolls, $8,493,082.56; 
the amount collected as licenses and taxes, court fees and fines, 
$153,102.88, and as net profits on business operations, $239,686.13, 
or a total of $8,885,871.57. The revenues earned were thus in excess 
of current expenses by $2,387,594.14. At this rate, by June 30, 
1921, the collections for tolls and other Canal revenues will exceed 
by $1,000,000 or more the total current expenses of operation and 
maintenance of the Canal to that date, after which there should be 
an excess of $5,000,000 or more each year. 

The total revenue derived from business operation carried on with 
Panama Canal funds amounted to $14,705,371.82, as against a total 
of $13,684,881.18 received during the preceding year. There was in 
1920 a net profit of $239,686.13 to be covered into the Treasury as mis- 
cellaneous receipts. The annual increases in business operations at 
the Canal is shown by the following table, giving the number and 
amounts of formal bills : 



Year. 


Number 
of bills. 


Amount. 


Year. 


Number 1 Amount 
of bills. ' Amount. 

1 


1915 


8,686 
13,754 
16,386 


$12, 197, 170. 74 
11,786,187.91 
17,007,342.16 


1918 


22,070 
24,210 
28,825 


$20, 887, 460. 60 


1916 


1919 


25, 272, 815. 50 


1917 


1920 


28,654,731.64 







The capital expenditures from construction appropriations total 
a little in excess of $1,000,000, the principal items being as follows: 
Dredging inner harbor at Balboa, $34,916.25, involving the removal 
of 63,050 cubic yards of material at an average division cost of 
$0.4991 per cubic yard, of this material 84 per cent was earth and 
16 per cent rock; sanitary fills and ditches, $9,503.54; settlement of 
claims for private property within the Canal Zone, $546,217.05; 
completion of Ancon hospital buildings, $19,877.26; the new garbage 
incinerator at Cristobal, $115,873.52; and completion of Pier No. 6, 
at Cristobal, $113,471.94. There was also transferred to the con- 
struction account about $900,000 which had heretofore been tenta- 



24 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

tively charged to operation and maintenance funds. The main 
items included in this amount were: Dredging Cristobal Harbor, 
$130,000; extensions to the electric current system, $233,000; fuel 
oil plants, $82,000; shop additions, $186,000; work on locks, $;60,000 
aids to navigation, $53,000. Amounts allotted to construction ap- 
propriation and available for expenditure include $2,329,898 for 
the two new coal barges, $250,000 for work on the colliers Ulysses 
and Achilles, $325,000 for dredging, and $81,000 for the payment 
of land claims, with certain other small items totalling a little in 
excess of $3,000,000. 

The charges to capital additions covering expenditures for per- 
manent improvements the cost of which was payable from opera- 
tion and maintenance appropriations were a little in excess of $900,000, 
of which the main items were: Extensions to the power and lighting 
system, $84,858.56; additions to fuel oil plant, $90,219.50; new 
garages, $20,425.56; fills, roads, and sewer systems, New Cristobal, 
$187,369.43; terminal storehouse and shop building, Cristobal 
piers, $46,182.33; fenders, Miraflores locks, $9,623.32; road from 
Balboa shops to Diablo, $34,452.44; repairs to Docks 13 and 14, 
Balboa, $32,481.84; quarters for gold employees, $183,000; quarters 
for silver employees, $48,000; and miscellaneous, $87,061.14. 

The total expenditures for construction of public works in the cities 
of Panama and Colon from 1904 to the end of the fiscal year were 
$1,430,208.91 and $1,220,382.03, respectively. The total expendi- 
tures for operation and maintenance of public works were $911,083.54 
for Panama and $798,127.58 for Colon. Under the agreement with 
the Republic of Panama all expenditures incurred by the United 
States for construction, operation and maintenance of waterworks, 
sewers, and pavements in the cities of Panama and Colon are to 
be reimbursed to the United States within a period of 50 years from 
July 1, 1907. Besides being authorized to currently reimburse 
itself from water rental collections for expenses of the operation and 
maintenance, the United States liquidates the expenditures for con- 
struction by quarterly charge of one-fourth of the part of the capital 
cost, ascertained by dividing the amount thereof by the number of 
years the contract has to run. In addition, the Republic of Panama 
pays interest at the rate of 2 per cent per annum on the capital cost 
balances and on the proportionate cost of waterworks in the Canal 
Zone used for supplying water to the two cities, based upon the 
quantity consumed. To liquidate the capital cost there has been 
paid to the United States, or is immediately due, the sum of $563,- 
442.21, leaving a balance unpaid of $1,106,926.48 for the work in 
Panama, and $980,222.25 for the work in Colon, payable in install- 
ments during the contract period. The amount which is payable 
immediately under the agreement is $94,179.05 and is covered by 
bills for the difference between the current charges for the work, 
plus the quarterly payments required, and the amount collected as 
water rentals. The Panama Canal continues to maintain the pave- 
ments in the two cities under a temporary agreement effected at the 
beginning of the fiscal year 1918, under which reimbursement is 
still obtained through water rental collections. 

There were audited prior to payment 403,231 pay roll items. 
Upon the final audit by the auditor for the War Department, 65 
errors were discovered, involving the sum of $274.58. The total 



KEPOKT OF THE GOVEKNOK. 25' 

amount of the rolls involved was $15,141,321.37. The gross deduc- 
tions on pay rolls aggregated $6,650,009.19. There were 347 exami- 
nations oi the accounts oi employees of The Panama Canal and Panama 
Railroad charged with the collection, disbursement and custody of 
Canal and railroad funds. 

The time inspection forces checked the timing of 10,442 gangs, 
with a total of 519,869 employees. On account of corrections made 
in the timebooks by the inspection forces, there was a saving of 
$3,822.90. 

Under the provisions of section 5 of the Panama Canal act, twa 
claims for damages to vessels passing through the locks were settled, 
amounting to $7,243.51; also two claims amounting to $2,361.98 
for damages to vessels in the Canal outside of the locks. Minor dam- 
ages to vessels were repaired at an expense of $5,179.12. The total 
expense for all claims of this kind was $14,784.61, all settled without 
recourse to the courts; corresponding figures for the previous year 
were $16,739.19. 

The schedule bonds of employees of The Panama Canal and Panama 
Railroad, executed to insure the faithful performance of their duties, 
were continued mth the Maryland Casualty Company. The total 
liability for Canal employees was $430,000 and for railroad employees 
$381,000. No claims were made during the year against the surety 
company for defalcations of employees. 

Commissary books for the payment of commissary and other pur- 
chases from the Canal were issued to employees on pay roll deduc- 
tions to the value of $5,627,605, which was $1,100,000 in excess of 
the issue for the preceding year. The total issue, including cash 
and pay roll deduction sales, was $7,727,437.50, as compared with a 
total of $6,510,997.50 for the preceding year. Meal tickets to the 
value of $46,329.50 were used by employees on the silver roll, a 
reduction of $21,000 from the amount used during the previous year. 

The unexpended balance in the Canal Zone funds, amounting to 
$6,220.11 was deposited in the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts. 
The collections for licenses and ta^^es wers $V5,354.05; court fees and 
fines, $27,694.45; postal reeeiptsj fa09,l,17.4S, v/ith miscellaneous 
items amoimting^to $57,2);o.p .7," making a 'total i)f $209,376.05; the 
corresponding figures foi* tHe previous year being' $136,5.76.29. The 
cash balance of raiscellaneous trust funds in the hands ol .the col- 
lector increased f.ropi'$683, 085. 9^ on June 30, ,1919, to $780,757.96 on 
June 30, 1920 There were issued i2o 1.22 uione'y orders to tliy value 
of $3,198,989.93, an increase of $90,311.71 over the previous year. 
Since the establishment of the money-order business on the Canal 
Zone, 2,454,002 money orders have been issued, to the value of 
$57,524,064.81. 

The revenue derived from the operation of the various clubhouses 
amounted to $427,118.67, as compared with $463,409.39 received 
during the prior year. The expenditures amounted to $452,600.34. 

For settlements under the injury compensation law there were 
pending 4 death cases and 141 injury cases at the beginning of the 
year. Three of the death cases were approved and 1 was disallowed ; 
16 of the injury cases were disallowed, the remainder being approved 
for payment wherever the time lost was in excess of 3 days. 
There were reported 4,451 accidental injuries and 17 accidental deaths 
of employees during the year. Compensation was allowed in 1,471 



26 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

cases of injury and 3 cases of death. Ten death cases are pending 
on account of injuries and deaths during the past year. There was 
paid to employees for injuries $17,705.17; to beneficiaries for deaths 
of employees, $3,946.67; to persons injured during the year there 
was paid the sum of $25,123.68; and to l)eneficiaries of employees 
dying as a result of injury in line of duty, $549.83. The payment of 
$1,200 to five inmates of the Corozal farm was authorized upon 
their repatriation. 

For further details see the report of the auditor, Appendix E. 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

This department continued under the Governor, assisted by Mi\ 
C. A. Mcllvaine, as executive secretary. In addition to the routine 
reports of different subdivisions of this department, the following 
general remarks are submitted with reference to matters affecting 
the compensation and living conditions of employees of the Canal 
and Panama Railroad: 

A census taken by the police division in June, 1920, shows a 
total civilian population of the Canal Zone of 21,650, of whom 9,529 
were employees. Three thousand four hundred and thirty-four were 
male Americans, 5,652 male aliens, 369 female Americans, and 74 
female aliens. The turnover in force of Americans, represented by 
new employees and separations from the service, was approximately 
30 per cent. There was an increased emigration to Cuba and the 
United States of the labor force of West Indians, but there remained 
available at all times a larger force than was required by the Canal 
and railroad. Careful analyses show increases in the cost of living 
in the Canal Zone since 1914 as follows: Food, 101.11 per cent; 
clothing, 71.59 per cent; household expenses, 105.30 per cent; and 
personal expenses, 65.47 per cent. 

Adjustments were made from time to time of the rates of pay of 
American employees on the gold roll in accordance with the policy 
of allowing an increase of 25 per cent above current rates in the United 
States for similar employment. A general exception to the rule of 
granting the full 25 percent increass.v/as made in the case of aU 
employees whose' bafeicrate in the United States was affected by the 
legislative bonus increase of $240 per annum. This exception was made 
on account pi lack of appropriations in the civil-government l)ranch to 
pay the increases oh -account of 'the additional $120 bonus in the 
tJnited States. The additiotiul' compensation to Canai employees on 
account of the increased bonus is reserved pending further action of 
Congress. Adjustments have been made from time to time in the 
compensation of West Indian employees in order to meet the in- 
creased cost of living. In these adjustments the rates effective in 
1914 were taken as a basis and the minimum rates and earnings were 
given primary consideration, since it is on the lowest paid classes of 
workmen that the })urdcns and increases of living costs are heaviest. 
The following statement shows the general trend of wages for the 
common labor class since 1914: 

Conis Cents 

per hour. per hour. 

May!, 1014 10 j November 1, 1918 17 

January 1, 1917 12 July 1, 1919 19 

October 1, 1917 13 February 1, 1920 21 

May 1, 1918 15 July 1, 1920 23 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 27 

Immediately following the adjustment of February 1, 1920, the 
organization of West Indian employees demanded an increase of 7 
cents an hour and certain other changes in conditions of employ- 
ment. The refusal to grant these demands was met with a strike on 
February 24, when from 15,000 to 17,000 men quit work. Thanks to 
the readiness of the American employees to turn to whatever work the 
exigencies required, the Canal was kept in operation without inter- 
ruption on account of the strike. The strike was broken by the 
retm-n of the men to work on March 2, and the general rule was fol- 
lowed of reemploying the mass of strikers who were not leaders as 
new employees, with a loss of certain rights and privileges pertaining 
to continuity of service. 

Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds. 

Clubhouses were operated for gold employees at Balboa, Ancon, 
Pedro Miguel, Gatun, and Cristobal; also for silver employees at 
La Boca, Red Tank, Paraiso, Gatun, and Cristobal. The clubhouse 
building at Balboa was improved by an enlargement of the reading 
room and the installation of bookcases in the library. The main 
floor of the Cristobal clubhouse was enlarged by the removal of the 
side walls of the building and the inclusion of the porch in the floor 
area. Local entertainments were given as usual, and entertainers 
have come down from the United States about once in two months. 
Moving pictures were exhibited in all clubhouses. The Balboa 
clubhouse has supervised the physical education of the grammar 
schools and of the high schools. One of the most useful and success- 
ful benefits of the physical education developed was instruction in 
swimming. All members of the senior class of the Balboa high 
school were required to pass a rigid test, before graduation, con- 
sisting of swimming and life saving. New play sheds were added 
to the equipment of the Pedro Miguel and Gatun clubhouses, and 
one was erected near Folks River beach in New Cristobal for the 
children of that community; the sheds are approximately 42 by 80 
feet. The average daily attendance of children 3 to 5 years of age 
on the five playgrounds was 164, and of children 6 years and over, 552. 
Decoration Day was observed on all playgrounds by appropriate 
patriotic exercises. A community Christmas pageant, with over 
165 children and 50 adults participating, was staged on the la"wn of 
the administration building on Christmas night by employees of 
this bureau. 

Record Bureau. 

In addition to maintaining the general files and permanent records 
of the Canal and railroad, this bureau has charge of the classification 
of records turned in by the field officers; publication of all rules and 
regulations, circulars, etc., documents, and publications; the custody 
of timekeeping records; the receipt, distribution, and dispatch of 
all mail for all offices of the administration building other than the 
accounting department; and the operation of the library system. 
The library has five branch libraries in the Canal Zone clubhouses. 
In the libraries there were 5,111 volumes received, classified, cata- 
logued, and prepared for circulation. On June 30, 1920, there were 
1,139 registered borrowers, with a circulation of 1,625 volumes per 
month. 



28 the panama canal. 

Personnel Bureau. 

This bureau maintains the personal files of each gold employee,, 
accounting for the history of service, salary status, leave of absence, 
transportation; organization status of the different divisions and 
bureaus of the Canal and railroad; and the records of all new em- 
ployees requisitioned from the United States. Under the provisions 
of the act for the retirement of the employees in the classified civil 
service the bureau began the examination of personnel files as a 
basis for the necessary reports on employees entitled to the benefits 
of this act. 

Property Bureau. 

This bureau has the actual property accounting for the entire 
Canal and railroad organizations. Physical checks of the property 
are made twice annually and the accounts of responsible officials 
entering on leave, transferring, or resigning are checked in each 
instance. 

Bureau of Pay Rolls. 

This bureau is charged with the preparation of all pay rolls of the 
Canal and Panama Railroad, based on the daily time reports. Prep- 
aration of the rolls involves deductions for collections for coupon 
books and other charges to employees paid by pay-roll deduction. 
Pay receipts prepared for Canal employees totaled 46,947 for gold 
employees and 175,622 for silver employees. 

Bureau of Statistics. 

The routine work of this bureau included the compiling of vital 
statistics for the health department; navigation statistics for the 
marine superintendent; preparation of data for wage adjustments; 
compilation of matter for The Panama Canal Record; investigations 
of cost of living; and, in addition, a special study of Canal services 
for official report or for replies to private inquiries. 

Division of Schools. 

The net enrollment for the year was 2,004 at the white schools and 
1,481 at the colored schools, a total of 3,485 as compared with 3,006 
in 1919. The average daily attendance at the white schools was 
1,588.5 and at the colored schools 864.9, making a total of 2,453.4 
as compared with 2,178.5 for the previous year. The number of 
white teachers employed during the ,year was 74, an increase of 2 
over the preceding year. There was an increase of 2 colored teachers, 
the number being 24. The best standards of the public schools in 
the United States were followed in the Canal Zone schools. Physical 
examinations were made in both white and colored schools of pupils 
and proper steps taken to remedy defects discovered. Manual 
training and household art classes were hold at Cristobal for the 
white pupils of Gatun and Cristobal schools and at Balboa for the 
white pupils of the Pedro Miguel, Ancon, and Balboa schools. In- 
struction in music was continued and satisfactory progress made. 
The night school of Spanish was conducted at Cristobal and night 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 29 

school of English, Spanish, French, shorthand, and manual training 
was conducted at Balboa. On July 1, 1919, there were 44 appren- 
tices taking the apprentice courses. There were 14 new enrollments; 
10 were graduated, 3 resigned, and 1 was discharged for unsatis- 
factory progress. At the close of the year there were 48 apprentices. 

Police and Fire Division. 

In addition to routine work the police division made numerous 
confidential investigations and reports of matters affecting the Canal 
and the general interests of the United States on the isthmus. Con- 
siderable extra work was handled in the police division during 
the strike of the silver employees. There were 4,202 arrests during 
the year, of whom 4,026 were males and 176 females. A montlily 
average of 92.25 prisoners served sentences in the common jails. 
' The total value of labor performed amounted to $19,486.94. Monthly 
patrols of the interior sections of the Canal Zone were continued to 
determine if any new clearings or cultivations were made or if any 
new buildings were being constructed by private parties in the 
depopulated areas. There were 23 arrests and 2 convictions for 
trespassing on Canal Zone lands. Fifty-four persons were deported 
from the Canal Zone; of this number 49 were convicts who had com- 
pleted terms of sentence in prison. Sixty-five convicts were re- 
ceived at the penitentiary during the year. The aggregate sentences 
imposed on convicts amounted to 83 years, 9 months, and 21 days. 
There were 51 discharges from the penitentiary on account of com- 
pleted terms of imprisonment. At the close of the year 53 convicts 
remained in custody. 

Periodical inspections were made by the fire division of all 
government buildings, docks, storehouses, yards, etc. Fire hose and 
fire extinguishers were maintained in good condition. Fifteen vol- 
unteer fire companies were maintained until March 1, 1920, when 
the number was increased to 22 companies. Each com.pany is com- 
posed of a maximum of 20 men, emploj'ees of the Canal and railroad. 
There were 129 fires and 14 false alarms reported during the year. 
Eight fires occurred in property of The Panama Canal, 21 in property 
of the railroad, 3 in property of the United States Army, and 15 in 
propertv of private individuals and United States Shipping Board. 
The total losses from all fires was $3,567,083.85, of which $1,970,000 
was a loss due to a fire on United States Shipping Board steamship 
il/r/rn-^, $1,502,000 to a fire on United States Shipping Board steam- 
ship Olockson, and $47,000 to the Army storehouse at Empire. 
Aside from the exceptional incidents of the fires on the two United 
States Shipping Board steamers, fire losses on the Canal Zone were 
very low. 

Division of Civil Affairs. 

Bureau of posts. — ^Total receipts from the postal service were 
$138,391.60, an increase of $1,764.20 above the previous year. 
Interest received on deposit money-order funds amounted to $22,- 
141.38. Under the agreement of December 3, 1904, with the Panaman 
Government, 40 per cent of the face value of postage stamps sold 
was paid to the Panaman Government, amounting to $33,783.97. 



30 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

There were issued 125,123 money orders, including deposit orders, 
amounting to $3,199,996.98, on which fees amounting to $10,207.85 
were collected. Compared with the preceding year there was a 
decrease of 15,495 in the number of orders issued and an increase of 
•591,295. 32 in the total amount. Deposit money orders issued during 
the Tear totaled $1,143,225, and payments of deposit money orders, 
$1,043,080. A total of 273,778 registered letters and parcels was 
handled, an increase of 10,168 above the previous year. Customs 
duties were paid to the Republic of Panama to the amount of $33,452 
on mail parcels for nonemployees and on dutiable articles imported 
by employees. A total of 107,161 sacks of transit mail from New 
York and New Orleans was received and dispatched, an increase of 
16,070 sacks over the preceding year. Of this total 94,733 sacks 
originated in the United States. 

Biirefiu of customs. — ^There was a marked increase in shipping at 
Canal ports. The total number of vessels entered was 6,023 and the 
total cleared 6,016, as compared with 4,604 entered and 4,590 cleared 
during the previous year. American vessels entered numbered 2,779 
and total number of American vessels cleared was 2,778, as compared 
with 1,959 entered and 1,940 cleared during the preceding year. 

Shi'pping commissioner. — The chief of division of civil affairs is also 
shipping commissioner, and the chief customs inspectors are deputy 
shipping commissioners. According to law the shipping commissioner 
and his deputies on the Canal Zone have the same powers as shipping 
commissioners in the United States ports and iVmerican consuls in 
foreign ports respecting American seamen. There were 4,281 sea- 
men shipped on American vessels and 3,278 discharged, as compared 
with 4,182 shipped and 3,453 discharged in the preceding year. Six 
hundred and twenty-four American seamen were subsisted or lodged 
in the Canal Zone during the year; of this number 288 were returned 
to the United States at the expense of the appropriation for the relief 
of destitute American seamen, and the remainder, 336, were signed 
on vessels and returned to the United States without expense to the 
Government. 

Administration of estates. — There were administered 258 estates of 
deceased or insane employees of the Canal and railroad, and 26 estates 
were in course of settlement on June 30, 1920. The amount involved 
in the settlements made was $16,314.77, of which $15,446.87 belonged 
to decedents' estates and $867.97 to the estates of insane persons. 

Courts. 

In the district courts 359 cases were pending at the beginning of the 
year, 875 were filed, 952 were settled during the year, and 282 were 
pending on June 30, 1920. Of the cases pending on the first of the 
fiscal year 158 were civil, 119 probate, and 82 criminal. The cases 
filed included 157 civil, 348 probate, and 370 criminal. Those settled 
inchided 189 civil, of which 101 were decided, 83 dismissed, 4 trans- 
ferred, and 1 reported off; 337 probate cases were settled. Of the 
426 criminal cases settled, 51 resulted in acquittal, 253 in convictions, 
67 wore nol prossed, 52 dismissed, and 3 transferred. Eight hundred 
and seventy-nine marriage licenses wore issued. Five deeds were 
recorded. Collections of costs, fines, forfeitures, fees, etc., in the 
district courts amounted to $9,431.17. 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 31 

In the magistrates' courts there wore 13 civil and 4 criminal cases 
pending at the beginning of the year. Dm-ing the year 3,744 criminal 
and 91 civil cases were docketed; 3,838 cases were disposed of, leaving 
3 civil and 1 1 criminal cases pending at the close of the year. Collec - 
tions from all sources in the magistrates' courts amounted to 
117,863.91. 

Relations with Panama. 

The executive secretary conducted the correspondence with the 
secretary of foreign relations of the Republic of Panama that arose 
in connection with matters affecting the direct relations between the 
Canal and the Republic of Panama. 

The various acts of Congress and Executive orders affecting The 
Panama Canal are printed as Appendix K. All details with reference 
to the operation of the executive department will be found in Appen- 
dix F. 

Office of the Special Attorney. 

Judge Frank Feuille, as special attorney, continued to represent 
the Government's interests before the joint commission for adjusting 
land claims of private owners whose property has been taken under 
the provisions of the treaty with Panama for purposes of construction, 
operation, maintenance, sanitation, and protection of The Panama 
Canal. In addition to these duties, he served as coiuisel for the 
Panama Railroad Company on the Isthmus and advised the Governor 
on certain legal questions affecting the administration of the office.. 

The joint commission appointed by the President of the United 
States and the President of Panama, in conformity with Articles VI 
and XV of the Panama Canal Treaty of 1903, was dissolved on 
March 10, 1920, after all of the cases on the docket had been disposed 
of with the exception of 16 remaining unsettled. The unsettled cases 
involve claims arising under leases or contracts for occupancy of land 
in the Canal Zone made with the Panama Railroad Company. By 
virtue of section 2 of the sundry civil appropriation act of July 1, 
1916, the Congress of the United States declared that the joint com- 
mission was without jurisdiction to adjudicate such claims, and that 
no part of the amounts appropriated by those acts or any other act 
could be used for the payment of such claims or for the payment of 
salaries and expenses of the commission in adjudicating or settling 
such claims. In view of these positive congressional mandates, the 
American members of the commission declined to proceed to a hearing 
of the 16 claims involved. The agents of the Panama Railroad have 
repeatedly advised the claimants, since they originally filed their 
claims with the commission, that the railroad company was willing 
to submit the controversy to the courts of the Canal Zone, but these 
offers have all been refused by the claimants. 

In the total of 3,600 claims filed with the commission since its 
organization, in 1913, the total amount of money claimed was S21,- 
072,235.41. Of this total number, 2,041 claims were dismissed by 
the commission on the ground that they had been settled directly 
between the claimants and agents of the United States. The aggre- 
gate demands of these 2,041 claims were -13,718,885.50; the aggregate 
amount paid in their settlement was S764,512.71. Because of a 
previous award having been made covering the same property, the 



.'32 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

'Commission dismissed 42 claims, involving an aggregate demand of 
S388,277.37. For want of jurisdiction the commission dismissed 
178 claims, involving a total demand of $1,504,821.15. There were 
10 claims withdrawn upon motion of claimants, the aggregate 
demands being $167,397.50. For want of merit the commission 
dismissed 106 claims, the aggregate demands being $1,374,040.38. 
Five claims, involving an aggregate demand of $1,798.50, were dis- 
missed by the commission, having been found to be duplicates of 
prior claims. The commission defaulted 318 claims, in which the 
aggregate demands were $974,062.28. Award was made by the 
commission in 844 claims, in which the aggregate demands were 
$6,116,682.97 and the aggregate amount awarded was $880,534.79. 

On account of disagreements the joint commission forwarded for 
settlement by the umpire 40 claims, in which the aggregate sum 
demanded was $6,704,490.76. The amount awarded by the umpire 
was $860,144.15. 

The various joint commissions and umpires appointed under the 
■Canal treaty prior to December 5, 1912, made 21 awards, aggregating 
the sum of $304,558. There are no data available indicating the 
aggregate of these 21 claims as demanded by the claimants. The 
law department of The Panama Canal was authorized to settle land 
claims by direct negotiation with the claimants, on August 6, 1908, 
by virtue of an Executive order of the President. Since that date 
the law department, and afterwards the office of the special attorney, 
under authority of the act of Congress of April 7, 1914, have settled 
directly with the claimants 5,599 claims for damages to land and 
improvements taken over by the Government for Canal and railroad 
purposes. The amounts paid in settlement of these claims aggre- 
.gated the sum of $1,403,378.86, including the sum of $764,512.71 
paid as direct settlement of 2,041 claims filed with the joint commis- 
sion and afterwards dismissed by the commission because of such 
settlements. Some settlements for improvements destroyed were 
made by the Canal and railroad organizations prior to August 6, 
1908, the amounts involved not being available in the records. 

The total amounts paid for land and improvement claims under 
awards of all of the commissions and umpu-es appointed under the 
Canal treaty, and under direct settlements made with the claimants 
since August 6, 1908, aggregate a grand total of $3,448,645.80. 
Fort3'-five land improvement claims were settled directly with 
claimants during the fiscal year 1920, aggregating the sum of $33,- 
238.96. At the beginning of the year there were pending before the 
joint commission 94 claims, involving an aggi'egate amount of 
$2,466,869.81. There were pending on that date before the umpire 
13 claims, the aggregate demands being $3,695,796.56. No new 
claims were filed during the year. 

The joint commission certified to tlie umpire for his decision 7 
claims, the total amount demanded being $686,516.67. The umpire 
disposed of a total of 20 claims during the year, wherein the aggregate 
demands were $4,379,313.23 and the aggregate award was $495,- 
776.70. Three of the claims, in which the demand totaled $253,600, 
were dismissed by the umpire. During the year the joint commission 
disposed of 71 claims — 7 by awards, 1 by dismissal on claimant's 
motion, 17 because of lack of jurisdiction, 22 on presentation of 
evidence that payments were made on direct settlement, 5 on account 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 33 

of previous award having been made for the same property, 9 were 
dismissed because of lack of merit, and 10 were dismissed under the 
commission's rule of default. 

On June 30, 1920, there were 58 lot licenses in effect on the Canal 
Zone, issued by the land agent on behalf of The Panama Canal; of 
this number, 7 were issued during the fiscal year. The revenue 
collected on these licenses for the year aggregated $16,290.02. 

For further details see Appendix H. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

This department remained imder the jurisdiction of Col. H, C. 
Fisher, United States Army, as chief health officer. The general 
health conditions of the Canal Zone and of the cities of Panama and 
Colon remained normal, except for the prevalence of an influenza 
epidemic which began early in the month of March, 1920. From 
this disease there were 601 cases and 50 deaths in March, 314 cases 
and 52 deaths in April, 40 cases and 24 deaths in May, and 138 cases 
and 7 deaths in June. The epidemic originated in the city of Colon, 
but later cases were reported from all parts of the Canal Zone and the 
city of Panama and its suburbs. Effective measures were taken to 
control the epidemic so far as possible. Schools, moving picture 
shows, and other places of assembly were closed for a period of two 
weeks. On March 21, 1920, a ship from Ecuador was received at 
Balboa quarantine with six cases of influenza. On June 23 a ship 
from Peru arrived with 23 cases. In both instances the local pas- 
sengers were detained in quarantine three days and the crew and 
other agents and employees were observed and temperatures taken 
for three days ; no new cases developed from these som-ces. 

There were 28 cases of smallpox reported during the. year, with no 
deaths. Among residents of the cities of Panama and Colon a sys- 
tematic vaccination was continued. On June 30, 1920, there were 
two cases in the hospital. One case of yellow fever was reported to 
the Balboa quarantine on August 10, 1919, from a ship arriving from 
Corinto, Nicaragua. There were no secondary cases following this 
case, and no cases of yellow fever originated on the Isthmus; 11 
cases of leprosy were admitted to the leper asylum during the year. 

With the cooperation of the chief health officer an antivenereal 
disease campaign has been conducted along the lines adopted in the 
United States by the Commission on Training Camp Activities of 
the War and Navy Departments. A free venereal disease clinic, 
where both curative and prophylactic treatments are given, was 
established in Santo Tomas Hospital, in Panama, on August 19, 1919, 
and one at Colon on March 1, 1920, maintained by the American 
National Red Cross. An educational campaign has been conducted; 
pamphlets have been distributed in English and Spanish, and moving 
pictures dealing with this subject shown. A notice of warning against 
all prostitutes was handed by the quarantine officers to the crews of 
all mcoming vessels. On account of the inevitable lack of authority 
to legislate m foreign territory, the recommendations and suggestions 
of the chief health officer and his assistants have been of an advisory 
character only, so far as the cities of Panama and Colon are concerned. 

8847—20 3 



34 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

In the population of the Canal Zone and vicinity the incidence of 
malaria ^vas less than in the preceding year, the number of cases 
reported having been 1,370 for 1920, as compared with 2,224 in 1919. 
The annual rate per thousand for employees living in the sanitated 
areas of the Canal Zone and the two terminal cities was 14.64 in 1920, 
as compared with 10.81 in 1919. In the unsanitated districts, camps, 
and plantations within the Canal Zone the rate per thousand was 
169.1.3 in 1920, as compared with 240.53 in 1919. 

Among the employees of the Canal and Panama Railroad the 
death rate per thousand for 1920 from all causes was 9.49, as com- 
pared with 8.43 in 1919. The death rate from tuberculosis was 1.43, 
as compared with 1.49 in 1919. The five diseases causing the highest 
number of deaths, with the rate, are as follows: Tuberculosis, 1.43; 
pneumonia. 1.15; influenza, 0.97; chronic nephritis, 0.87: organic 
diseases of the heart 0.46. 

In the average population of the Canal Zone of 30,954, including 
the military population, there were 253 deaths, 219 of which were 
from disease, with a rate of 7.08 per thousand for disease alone, as 
compared with 9.4 in 1919. 

In the city of Panama there were 1,278 deaths, of which 1,234 were 
from disease, giving a rate of 20.11 for disease alone, as compared 
with 21.85 for the preceding year, on the basis of an average popu- 
lation of 61,369. In Panama City the death rate from tuberculosis 
was 3.8 per thousand, as compared with 4.3 for the year 1919. Of 
the total deaths reported in the city of Panama 42 per cent occurred 
among children under 5 years of age. 

In the city of Colon there v/ere 567 deaths, of which 527 were from 
disease, giving a death rate of 20.21 from disease alone, as compared 
with 23.28 the preceding year, on the basis of an average population 
of 26,078. 

Division of Hospitals. 

Ancon Hospital. — At the surgical clinic there were performed 1,944 
major operations; 3,134 cases visited the out-patient department; 
314 obstetrical cases were delivered. In the medical clinic 2,611 
cases were treated in the out-patient department. In the eye and 
ear clinic 7,443 cases were examined in the out-patient department. 
A total of 2,606 })rescriptions were written, 967 refractions were 
made, and 976 operations performed. In the X-ray clinic a total of 
3,333 cases were handled; 7,197 plates and 1,708 dental films were 
taken. In the steward's department there were 164,218 rations 
issued to Ancon hospital patients and 92,790 rations to hospital em- 
ployees, making a total of 257,008 rations issued. A total of 10,393 
patients were axlmitted. At the board of health laboratory the work 
included examinations of milk, beverages, drugs, canned foods, and 
miscellaneous sup])lies, as well as clinical examinations requiring 
quantitative determination. The entomological department of this 
laboratory covered the study of insects infesting food and stored 
products," household insects. Vegetables and truck crop insects, and 
the more important pests of tropical fruit trees. At the re(|uest of 
the United States Department of Agriculture the laboratory facilities 
were made available to an entomological inspector of the Federal 
Hoi-ticultural Jioard, who was assisted by the chief of laboratory. 
The principal object in view was to ascertain what dangerous pests 
occur in the Canal Zone which might, on account of the concentration 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 35 

of traffic and commerce from all parts of the world, be potential 
menaces to the continental United States. 

Corozal Hospital. — On June 80, 1920, there were 344 patients and 
26 chronic cripples at the Corozal Hospital. In the treatment of the 
insane the occupational department was expanded. The officers of 
the Mental Hygiene Society in New York sent down free of charge 
an industrial instructor, who remained here three months and in- 
structed the chief nurse in the essentials of an industrial department. 
The occupational treatments proved to be beneficial to the class of 
insane patients at this hospital. Most of the articles made by the 
patients, including rugs, hats, handbags, wood carving, etc., have 
found ready sale. Most of the male patients are cultivating gardens 
attached to the hospital plant. From appropriations made l)y Con- 
gress a new hospital ward was erected, with accommodations for 80 
patients, and was occupied in January, 1920. It has been possible 
to isolate all tubercular insane patients. The grounds within the 
hospital have l^een kept in order by patients' help. The dairy main- 
tained at this hospital was continued and milk supplied, under pre- 
scription, to the patients in Ancon Hospital. On June 30, 1920, the 
herd consisted of 3 bulls, 74 cows, and 38 calves. At the piggery 
there WT^re on hand at the end of the year 27 hogs and 120 pigp. 
Most of the pigs wdien ready for use are sold to the supply department. 
The number of cripples remaining at the hospital on June 30, 1920, 
was 4 white and 27 black, a reduction of 21 during the year. 

Colon Hospital. — Emergency cases are admitted to the Colon Hos- 
pital; others, both medical and surgical, are transferred to the Ancon 
or Santo Tomas Hospitals. Efforts were made to keep the number 
of patients in Colon Hospital to 50 or below. The number of admis- 
sions at this hospital during the year were as follows: Employees, 
305; Armv and Navv, 88; Panama pay patients, 5; other pay patients, 
427; charity patients, 62, making a total of 887. A total of 403 
surgical operations were performed at this hospital. 

Santo Tomas Hospital. — This hospital, located in the city of Pan- 
ama, is owned by the Panaman Government, but is operated by agree- 
ment under the general supervision of the chief health officer oi the 
Canal, The superintendent, two physicians, and three nurses are 
emplo3^ees of the Canal. With the cooperation of the Panaman Gov- 
ernment a practical system of bookkeeping and property accounting 
has been installed, and a systematic survey of the financial condition 
was made. All of the debts of the institution have been paid. From 
revenues pertaining to the Republic of Panama, derived from liquor 
taxes and the national lottery, plans have been made and approved 
and construction commenced on an entirely new hospital plant. The 
site of the new plant is on a high point facing the Pacific Ocean, in 
the suburbs of the city of Panama. The estimated cost of tlie total 
project is ."$1,000,000. ' The total capacity of the hospital will be 600 
patients under normal conditions, with facilities for emergency ex- 
pansion to 900 patients. The following equipment and facilities arc 
being installed at the institution: Sound-proof walls, silent bell call 
system; floor lights and inclosed clothes chutes; an X-ray suite; 
library and class room; venereal and dental clinics. A radium, de- 
partment will be a feature of the surgical suite, and hj^dro and electric 
therapeutic installations will also be added to the institution. 



86 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Palo Seco Leper Asylvm. — The number of cases in this institution 
at the close of the 3^ear was 74. There were 11 admissions and 39 
were discharged — 2 from Gatun, 1 from Empire, 4 from Panama, 
and 1 from Juan Diaz, in the Repubhc of Panama. Three deaths 
occurred during the year. Two patients were paroled who were 
afflicted with a noninfectious type of leprosy; they will report to the 
health department once every six months for examination and report 
as to condition. One patient was deported to his home in Martinique 
and 1 to Barbados. 

Sanitation. 

The principal work of the division of sanitation consists in anti- 
mosquito work. The four sanitary districts remain as described in 
last year's report except that the former Army post at Las Cascadas, 
on the west side of the Canal, is now sanitated by our forces as this 
town was turned over to the Canal and opened by the supply depart- 
ment for silver employees of the Canal. On account of an outbreak 
of malaria in Colon and Mount Hope and vicinity, drainage ditches 
extending to sea level were excavated in swamps on Telfer's Island 
and in the vicinity of Mount Hope. All swampy territory within a 
mile of the dry dock was thus drained. Drainage work was also 
done in the vicinity of Gatun, in a swamp north of Gatun dam and 
west of the old French canal. Near Pedro Miguel tile drainage was 
installed in the fortifications clearings formerly used as cattle pas- 
tures. In the Ancon-Corozal district the outlying areas requiring 
maintenance by oiling and other temporary measures have been 
improved by the construction of open ditches lined with half-round 
concrete drains. No extensive construction was required in the 
Balboa district. Constant vigilance was exercised to reduce so far 
as possible the number of rats in the vicinity of dwellings, store- 
houses and steamship piers. Systematic rat destruction was carried 
on in the terminal cities by poison and traps, and examinations were 
made by the board of health laboratory in all cases to determine if 
any plague infection was present. Because of the prevalence of 
plague in both North and Central American ports, the destruction 
of rats is an important protective measure in the Canal Zone against 
the importation and spread of plague. 

Quarantine Division. 

Inspection trips were made by the chief quarantine officer and 
by the quarantine officer at Cristobal to various ports in Central and 
South America in order to discover the actual conditions as to the 
incidence of yeUow fever and plague at those ports. As a result of 
these inspections the 6-day quarantine was lifted against the Atlantic 
ports of Colombia. Fumigation of all vessels arriving from the 
west coast of South America, which discharged cargo at a Canal Zone 
jport, was continued, and these vessels are fumigated, empty, once 
.every tliree months for the destruction of rats. On account of the 
unsatisfactory plague situation at Paita, Peru, the separate fumiga- 
tion on the arrival at Cristobal of all cargo lifted at this port was 
instituted as a matter of precaution. Steamship companies have 
given hearty cooperation in these protective measures. Quarantine 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR. 37 

inspection of incoming vessels from "clean" ports, at the Balboa 
entrance up to 10 o'clock at night, was started on February 16, 
1920. Up to June 30, 1920, only 9 ships had availed themselves 
of this privilege. At Cristobal 203 ships were inspected at night. 
The quarantine service is charged with the enforcement of immigra- 
tion regulations of the Canal Zone and Republic of Panama, aided in 
cases of American seamen and Chinese by the customs bureau. 
For further details see report of chief health officer. Appendix I. 

WASHINGTON OFFICE. 

This office remained in charge of Mr. A. L. Flint, as general pur- 
chasing officer and chief of office. The work is divided into three 
general subdivisions; Administrative office, including the appoint- 
ment division and the correspondence and record division: ofhce of the 
assistant auditor; and the purchasing department. The work of the 
appointment division was affected by unusual conditions during 
the year, including the shortage of skilled and technical men in the 
United States available for appointment on the Canal; interruption 
of sailing schedules to the Isthmus during the summer and autumn 
of 1919, and the loss during the year of most of the experienced 
clerks engaged in this work. 

On May 5, 1920, a requistion was received from the Isthmus for 
130 building tradesmen. Forty-two per cent of those tendered 
appointments during the year failed to accept. Seventeen hundred 
and ninety-two persons were tendered appointments in the grades 
above that of laborer, of which 1,032 accepted and were appointed. 
Four thousand five hundred and ninety-two persons, including new 
emploj^ees, those returning from leaves of absence, and members 
of employees' families, were provided with transporation from the 
United States to the Isthmus. In response to inquiries and appli- 
cations for employment, and in the issuance of appointments, 
21,435 letters were written; 7,525 telegrams were sent, and 43,222 
circulars were mailed. 

The increasing commercial use of the Canal since the war has de- 
veloped a corresponding increase in the work of the correspondence 
and record division in answering inquiries and disseminating general 
information and literature regarding the Canal. 

In the assistant auditor's office 13,635 disbursement vouchers, 
amounting to SS, 180, 673. 25, and 225 collection vouchers, amounting 
to SI ,678,875.44 were prepared. An administrative examination was 
given 1,661 settlements by transfer of appropriations, aggregating 
$2,106,758.79. Reports were made on 31 claims submitted to the 
auditor for the War Department. One hundred and twenty-one con- 
tracts were prepared, amounting to 85,130,714.76. The assistant 
auditor, as legal adviser in the United States for The Panama Canal, 
has continued to render assistance to the Department of Justice in 
connection with the preparation for trial, and at the trial in the courts, 
of all cases in connection with actions brought by or against The 
Panama Canal. During the year suits have been pending against The 
Panama Canal involving claims amounting to S19,339.48. All cases 
were settled in favor of the Government except one, which is still 
pending in the district court of the seventh district, New York. 



38 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

The purchasing department issued 8,367 orders for material and 
supphes, an increase of 898 as compared with the fiscal year of 1919. 
The total value of the orders placed was $9,183,069.94, as compared 
with $6,764,278.82 for the fiscal year 1919. Sales in the United States 
of scrap and obsolete Canal material handled by the purchasing de- 
partment during the year amounted to $678,402.82, based on 58 sale 
orders, as compared with .$423,194.90, based on 70 sale orders during 
the preceding year. 

The work of inspection of material purchased has been facilitated as 
heretofore by assistance of the field officers of the Corps of Engineers, 
United States Army, in charge of districts, by the Bureau of Stand- 
ards, Bureau of Mines, Bureau of Chemistry of the Department of 
Agriculture, and the Medical Department, Ordnance Department, 
Signal Corps, and Quartermaster Corps of the United States Army. 

The principal purchases were made by the Washington office, 
although offices in charge of assistant purchasing agents have been 
continued at New York, New Orleans, and San Francisco. These 
offices act as receiving and forwarding agents for such material as has 
been purchased in their respective ports. A small force of employees 
has been continued in the medical branch. Zone Supply Office, United 
States Army, to assist the officers in charge in making purchases of 
medical and hospital supplies on the Isthmus, most of which have 
Leen purchased through that branch. 

For further details of the operations of this office, see report of 
general purchasing officer and chief of office. Appendix J. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor, The Panama Canal. 

Hon. Newton D. Baker, 

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C. 



APPENDIX A. 
REPORT OF THE ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



The Panama Canal, 
Office of the Engineer of Maintenance, 

Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, July 20, 1920. 
Sir: The following is a report of the work done under the jurisdic- 
tion of this office during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920: 

organization. 

The duties of the engineer of maintenance were increased during 
the year by the issuance of your order dated August 15, 1919, instruct- 
ing me to have supervision over the work of the building division. 
During the year the personnel in charge of the various divisions and 
sections reporting to this office was as follows: 

Building division. — Mr. Hartley Rowe resigned, effective August 
15, 1919, and Mr. T. C. Morris was appointed resident engineer in 
charge of the building division. 

Electrical division. — Mr. Walter L. Hersh, electrical engineer. 

Locl^s division. — Mr. E. D. Stillwell, superintendent of the Atlantic 
locks. 

Mr. W. R. Hollo way, superintendent of the Pacific locks. 

Municipal division. — Mr. D. E. Wright, municipal engineer. 

Section of meteorology and hydrography.- — Mr. R. Z. Kirkpatrick, 
chief hydrographer. 

Section of office engineer. — Mr. C. J. Embree, office engineer. 

Dredging division. — Mr. J. M. Pratt, superintendent. 

Section of surveys. — Mr. O. E. Malsbury, assistant engineer. 

Maintenance of Gatun dam and hack f lis. — Mr. J. J. Walsh, general 
foreman. 

Locks Division, 
operation. 

On July 25 the largest American ships to transit the Canal went 
through Gatun locks going south. They were the dreadnaughts 
New Mexico and Mississippi, sister ships of 32,000 tons each, length 
624 feet and beam 97 feet 4^ inches. 

The largest ship to transit the Canal to date is the British battle 
cruiser Renown, which passed through the Canal on March 30, 1920, 
with the Prince of Wales. She has a length of 795 feet and a displace- 
ment of 33,379 tons, her beam being 9H feet. 

39 



40 



THE PANAMA CANAL,. 
LOCKAGES. 



T^e follomng table gives the record of lockage operations for the 
past fiscal year: 





Gatun. 


Pedro 
Miguel. 


Miraflores. 


Lockages. 
Commercial loctages: 


2,290 
14 
6 


2,360 
17 
5 


2,289 
15 






4 






Total commercial lockages 


2,310 


2,382 


2,308 






Noncommercial lockages: 

Canal 


77 
172 


292 
185 


243 


U. S. Navy and U. S. Army 


180 








249 


477 


423 






Commercial lockages in which noncommercial vessels were included. 


175 


234 


262 


Summary: 


2,310 
249 


2,382 

477 


2,308 




423 






Total lockages 


2,559 


2,859 


2,731 






Vessels. 


2,498 
36 


2,507 
20 


2,508 
20 










2,534 


2,527 


2,528 






Noncommercial: 


1 

93 

115 

56 

258 
16 
43 
32 


93 
123 
306 
129 

284 

9 

27 

32 


85 




108 




287 




126 


Noncommercial U. S. Armvand U. S. Navy: 


283 




11 


Tugs 


27 




51 








614 


10,003 


978 








2,534 
614 


2,527 
1,003 


2,528 




978 






Total vessels 


3,148 


3,530 


3,506 







The average number of lockages per month for Gatun was 213.25 as 
compared w^ith 180^^ for last year. The average number of lockages 
for the Pacific side was 238.25 as compared with 203 § last year 
The month having the maximum number of lockages and vessels was 
December, 1919, when the record was as follows: 





Atlantic 
locks. 


Pacific 
locks. 




252 
16 


259 




32 






Total number of lockages 


268 


291 




269 
43 


266 




75 








312 


341 







EEPORT OF EFGINEEE OF MAINTENANCE. 



41 



WATER CONSUMPTION GATUN LAKE. 

Complete data regarding the hydrography of Gatun Lake for the 
calendar year are included in the report of the chief hydrographer given 
hereinafter. The following table has been compiled to give complete 
information regarding the average monthly supply and demand of 
water for the past fiscal year: 

Average quantity of water per month. 



Wateriest: 

Loss in storage, Gatun Lake 

By evaporation 

By wastage over Gatun spillway . 

By leakage, Gatun spillway 

By transfer to Miraflores Lake 

By leakage , all locks , 



Total water lost. 



Water used: 

For pumping 

For lockages, Atlantic 

For lockages , Pacific 

For hydroelectric station. 

Total water used 



Cubic feet. 



Total water lost and used 13, 559, 880, 000 



879,790,000 

1,994,150,000 

5.433,670,000 

9,500,000 

31, 700, 000 

47,210,000 



8,396,020,000 



74,650,000 

857,900,000 

745,310,000 

3,486,000,000 



5,163,860,000 



Percentage. 



10.4786 

23.7511 

64. 7172 

.1132 

.3776 

. 5623 



Percentage 
of total. 



100. 0000 



1.4456 
16.6135 
14.4332 
67. 5077 



100.0000 



6.4882 

14. 7062 

40.0717 

.0700 

.2.338 

.3482 



61.9181 



.5505 

6.3268 

5.4964 

25. 7082 



38.0819 



The maximum lake elevation for the year was 87.16 feet in Decem- 
ber, the average 84.85 feet, and the minimum elevation of Gatun Lake 
was 81.65 feet in May of this year. As detailed in the report of the 
chief hydrographer, water was conserved in Gatun Lake by a partial 
relief of the hydroelectric station through operation of the Miraflores 
steam station. The controlling reason for this was the acute situa- 
tion at Cucaracha slide from February 22 to early in June, during 
which time, as was anticipated, the gains in levels eft'ected by this 
saving of water facilitated the transit of some of the larger ships. 

PAINTING AND MAINTENANCE. 

In line with the adopted policy of maintenance of underwater 
structures by unwatering at three-year intervals, maintenance at 
Miraflores locks started with the installation of the floating caisson 
in the east chamber on December 12, the work being completed 
January 31. The west chamber was un watered February 2 and the 
work completed Februar}^ 7. Work was started at Pedro Miguel west 
chamber February 12 and completed March 27. The east chamber 
at Pedro Miguel was not overhauled because of the congested trafiic 
conditions in the short stretch of the Canal north of Pedro Miguel due 
to the emergency brought about by conditions at Cucaracha slide. 

During the maintenance work it was found that the teredo has 
attacked the grecnheart sill timbers of the gates. New sills were in- 
stalled on gates 120, 121, 123, 124, 108, 109, and 113 at Miraflores locks. 
The teredo was also found attacking the greenheart sills in the west 
chamber at Pedro Miguel locks, where the fresh water of Gatun Lake 
passes into Miraflores Lake, the latter 54§ feet above sea level. 



42 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

TOWING LOCOMOTIVES. 

The towing locomotives have continued to render excellent service 
throughout the year. All locomotives were thoroughly overhauled 
and painted, the slip drums being tested at varying intervals, but a 
test is made at least once every two weeks. Only one accident 
occurred during the year when one of the machines went down the 
incline under the emergency dam at Pedro Miguel and collided with 
another machine, injuring one cab. 

TRANSFORMER ROOMS. 

In the transformer rooms all oil switches are tripped at least once a 
week for test. 

The oil switch banks have been thoroughly overhauled, the relays 
checked, the busses retaped where necessary, and the oil in oil 
switches and transformers has been filtered. Steps have been taken to 
install disconnective switches on all towing track feeders at Gatun to 
assist in operation. 

MITER GATES. 

All miter gates are sounded each week and necessary repairs made. 
The control piping leading through to the air compartment has been 
rusting badly ancl orders have been issued to remove all miter gates 
sump pumps and their respective control piping. 

We have continued to maintain the bitumastic enamel on the 
interior and exterior of the lock gates, the American Bitumastic 
Enamels Co. guarantee having expired at all locks except Miraflores, 
where the ])ainting of the exterior of the gates is still under guarantee. 

RISING STEM VALVES. 

During the maintenance of Miraflores and Pedro Miguel locks the 
rising stem valves were removed and completely overhauled. The 
side seal strips of guayacon were found badly eaten by teredos and 
the bottom seals of greenheart were in the same condition. 

The wearing pads and roller trains of all valves were found to be 
in bad con(Ution and in many cases %vill have to be repla^^ed on the 
next overhauling. In some cases the bronze nuts on the rising stems 
have worn down to a point where they sheared off in service; the depth 
of the sheared thread on one set was found to be about one-sixteenth 
inch at the base, the original thickness being one-half inch. 

CYLINDRICAL VALVES. 

All leather seals on the cylindrical valves of the Pacific locks are 
being removed and replaced with rubber. The balance of the valves 
have been maintained in fair condition by the bituminous enamel 
applied during the last maintenaive period. 

CULVERT SCREENS. 

"WTien the maintenance work at Mirafiores locks was started it was 
found that the intake screen on valve No. 406 had ])assed through the 
culvert and was found on the caisson seat at the lower end of the 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 43 

locks. The culvert and valves were examined and no apparent dam- 
age was done by the screen in its travel through the culvert. Several 
other screens were found so badly bent that they could not be lifted 
through the bulkhead slots, but had to be pulled out through the end 
of the culvert. 

EMERGENCY DAM. 

The usual maintenance of the emergency dams has been carried 
on, the dams at Gatun being repainted in March. We have con- 
tinued to operate each pair of dams at all locks once each month, 
one dam being operated at night and one in the daytime. Two 
quadrants were found to have settled, the east one at Miraflores and 
the west one at Pedro Miguel. As the cjuadrants were found to be 
as much as 1} inches out in places, it was necessary to take up all rack 
castings, pull the foundation bolts, and reset the entire set of quadrant 
castings of the dams mentioned. 

FENDERS. 

The wooden fenders installed along the approach walls of all locks 
have begun to deteriorate due to dry rot, they are being replaced at 
present with native hardwood almendra. The marine division con- 
sidered it necessary to install a third and lower set of fender timbers 
at lower Miraflores locks to take care of extreme low tide conditions. 
The new fenders were put in by the building division, the work being 
completed November 7, 1919. 

TRANSPORTATION. 

A 1-ton Ford truck has been added to the equipment of the Pacific 
locks and will be used to handle supplies from the storehouse as 
well as carrying men to Miraflores locks when the launch is out of 
commission. A new railroad speeder has just been delivered and 
will be used for handling heavy material between Corozal storehouse 
and Miraflores locks. 

Following are extracts from reports of the lock superintendents, 
covering details of operation and maintenance of the locks. 

Pacific Locks, 
organization and personnel. 

There were few changes in the personnel, but the general organization remained the 
same as throughout the previous year with the exception of the addition of two super- 
visors and additions in some of the minor positions, all ot which are covered below. 

Mr. W. R. Holloway continued as superintendent throughout the year, with Mr. 
J. 0. MjTick as assisant superintendent. Mr. D. H. Moore was promoted from assist- 
ant mechanical supervisor to the newly authorized position of mechanical supervisor, 
and Mr. Oliver Bullock was promoted from assistant electrical super\'isor to the newly 
authorized position of electrical supervisor, both promotions being made effective 
May 16, 1920. Mr. R. S. Mills and Mr. A. E. Meigs continued in the other two posi- 
tions of electrical super\isor and mechanical supervisor, respectively, thorughout the 
year. 

Due to the increase in traffic it was found necessary to increase the gold organization 
by two control house operators — one each for Pedro Miguel and IMiraflores locks. The 
gold organization was also increased by the addition of one utility foreman. 

Approximately 47 per cent of the silver force joined the strikers in the strike that 
commenced on February 24, 1920. Twenty-six per cent of the strikers returned to 
work, and by taking on new men the silver force was back to normal in one month. 
There was no delay to shipping on account of the strike. 



44 THE PANAMA CANAL.. 

OPERATION. 

Operations were continued throughout the year on a two-shift basis, covering a 
period from 7 a. ra. to 6 p. m., at Pedro Miguel locks and from 7 a. m. to 8.30 p. m., 
at Mirafiores locks. It has been found necessary at times to hold the men beyond the 
regular working day, but the above hours take care of traffic under normal conditions. 

Tabulations arc attached showing lockages by months for both Pedro Miguel and 
Mirafiores locks, and a tabulation is also attached showing the total lockages for the 
year. There was an increase in lockages of 16 per cent a"t Pedro Miguel and 17 per 
cent at Mirafiores locks over the number for the last fiscal year. 

There were no delays to traffic due to failure of the operating machinery. 

Practice operations of the emergency dams were made monthly, but no emergency 
operations were necessary. 

The spillway at Mirafiores was operated to maintain Mirafiores Lake at the proper 
elevation, which is 54 feet above sea level. 

PAINT MACHINE. 

The paint machine was operated throughout the year, approximately 3,000 gallons 
of paint being manufactured for the Atlantic and Pacific locks. 

LAUNCHES AND BOATS. 

The launches Mnry S and Dora Fwere operated on Mirafiores I^ake for transporting 
men and material back and forth between Pedro Miguel and Mirafiores locks. The 
launch Mary S was given a complete overhauling during the year. 

Two round-bottom pilot boats were made during the year, this work being done by 
the lock forces. 

COROZAL STORE. 

The storehous:3 was operated at Corozal throughout the year in connection with the 
storing and issuing of spare parts for the Atlantic and Pacific locks. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

A Ford truck was secured for service in connection with handling material and 
supplies f,or the locks, and a motor car was also secured for operation on the branch 
line between Corozal and Mirafiores locks. 

Towing locomotive No. 667 was damaged in a collision with locomotive No. 670 at 
Pedro Miguel locks. It was necessary to install a new cab on locomotive No. 667 
and also to install new panels and controller. All work was done by the lock forces 
with the exception of the building of the cab, whi(;h work was done by the mechanical 
division at Balboa shops. 

Low-tide fenders were installed on both sides o| the south approach wall at Mira- 
fiores locks, extending from the chains to the end of the wall. The construction of 
these fenders consists of a single row of 12 by 12 inch timbers, 7 feet below the lower 
section of the original fenders. This work was done by the building division. 

Work was started by the lock forces installing a single row of fenders from the chains 
to the outer gates at both ends of Pedro Miguel and Mirafiores locks, on the center 
walls. This work has been completed at the north end of Pedro Miguel locks. 

Inspection of the emergency dam quadrants showed that it was necessary to adjust 
the quadrant of the east dam at Mirafiores locks and both dams at Pedro Miguel locks. 
All this work was completed during the year. 

MAINTENANCE. 

The floating caisson was given a complete overhauling. In connection with this 
work new impellers were installed in all pumps. 

The spillway caisson was also given an overhauling. It was necessary to renew 
the bottom sill in its entirety, as well as to install a new roof. The caisson was also 
coated with bitiimastic enamel. 

The fender timbers at both sots of locks were inspected and renewed where necessary. 

The soft nose at the north end of Pedro Miguel locks was overhauled. 

The east chamber at Mirafiores locks and the west chamber at Pedro Miguel locks 
wore unwatered in order to give the submerged parts an overhauling and for touching 
up the bitumastic on the gates and valves. This work is covered in detail below. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 45 

OVERHAULING AT MIRAFL0RE8. 

The caisson was sunk at the lower end of the east lock on December 12, 1919. The 
overhauling was completed and the caisson raised on January 23, 1920. The caisson 
was then sunk in place at the upper end of the same lock on January 26, 1920, to 
expose the upstream and bottom surfaces of the upper gates. This work was com- 
pleted and the caisson raised on January 31. V)20. The caisson was then sunk at 
the upper end of the west lock on February 2, 19.! ), to expose the upstream and bottom 
surfaces of the upper gates, and was floated again on the completion of this work on 
February 7, 1920. The general condition of the submerged parts as found on unwater- 
ing the locks and the report of maintenance work done on them are covered under 
each item. This work was all done by the lock forces. 

Miter gates. — -The bitumastic enamel on the submerged surfaces was generally 
spotted from rust on the exterior of the gates. On the four lower gates (Nos. 120, 121, 
124, and 125) a heavy barnacle growth was found. This growth was scraped off and 
it was then found necessary to re-cover the entire submerged surface with new enamel. 
The exterior surfaces of the other gates were then gone over and all rust spots cleaned 
and scraped, after which the spots were touched up with new enamel. 

On the south side of the interior of gates Nos. 117, 11(3, 120, and 121 the heat had 
caused the enamel to soften and run, lea\'ing a very thin coat. The interior surfaces 
of these gates were reenameled where the coat had become thin, and the remaining 
surfaces on the interior, as well as the interior surfaces of all other gates, were carefiilly 
gone OA^er and rust spots cleaned and scraped, after which they were touched up with 
new enamel. 

Hermastic enamel was used on all exterior surfaces in the east lock and on the 
interior of gates Nos. 108. 116, 117, 120, and 124. Barber asphalt was used on all 
other interior surfaces. The exterior surfaces of gates Nos. 102 and 103 were patched 
with Navy enamel. 

The conduit and pipes for the sump pumps in the gates were found to be badly 
corroded in all gates, and in some practically eaten through. All sump pumps, 
conduit, and pipes, except sounding tubes, were removed from the gates, and the 
holes where the pipes had passed through the water-tight bulkheads were plugged. 

Some of the greenheart seals at the bottom of the gates were damaged by the teredo 
The seals were repaired at nine gates, 180 linear feet of 12 inch by 12 inch almendra 
timber being used to replace the worm-eaten timbers that had been taken out. 

Three hundred and thirty linear feet of the oak fenders at the tops of the gates that 
were weakened by decay were replaced with almendra. 

Rising stem valves. — T^he bitimiastic enamel was in fair condition except on the 
rivet heads, butt straps and top seal castings. The four lower valves were covered 
with barnacles. The bottoms of the valves were badly pitted. The rivet heads 
were partly eaten away, weakening their tensile strength. The wearing pads on the 
valves were badly pitted. A number of the side seal springs were broken. The end 
rollers were nearly all stuck fast and had "fiats" worn on them. The lignum-vitse 
side seal and bottom seal strips had been damaged by the teredo. The roller trains 
were generally in bad condition, the rollers being pitted with rust and reduced in 
size. The rollers were very loose in their bearings, due to wear and con'osion. reduc- 
ing the diameter of the shaft and enlarging the bearings. The fixed irons in the cul- 
vert were badly corroded, especially the roller train and end roller tracks. 

Twelve valves were overhauled at this time. The valve machines were dismantled 
and the valves lifted out for overhauling. The bottom seals of all valves were planed 
to a true surface. Two hundred and twenty-one defective rivets were backed out 
and new rivets driven. All broken side seal springs were renewed. The end rollers 
were turned in the lathe to eliminate "flats" and then shimmed out when mounted. 
The lignum-vitse side seal and bottom seal strips were renewed with strips of the 
same material that had been impregnated with creosote. The roller trains had to 
be practically rebuilt, straight iron bars Ijeing used in place of channels for the con- 
tainers. Several top seal castings and seals were repaired. The fixed irons in the 
culvert were scraped and cleaned, after which they were coated with hermastic 
enamel. The bearing surfaces were greased. The barnacles were scraped off the 
four lower valves and these valves were then recoated. All rivet heads and other 
exposed parts were patched with enamel. 

Cylindrical valves. — When the chamber was unwatered it was found that the rubber 
seals installed on the valves on the west side had practically eliminated leakage. 
Rubber seals were installed on the 20 valves on the east side. The valves were 
found to be in very good condition except the leather seals, which were very hard 
and badly deteriorated. The enamel was in good condition. Necessary touching up 



46 THE PANAMA CANAL,. 

was done. There was very little rusting or pitting on any part of the valves. A 
few bolts, nuts, and cap screws were renewed. The stems were repacked on all the 
valves on the east side. 

Guard V lives. — The screens for guard valves Nos. 407 and 408 were removed on 
December 9, 1919. It was necessary to do consideralde repair work on l)0th of them 
due ^3 rivet heads and spacers being eaten away. The screen for No. 406 had col- 
lapsed and had been washed through the culvert, lodging on the caisson seat at the 
lower end of the locks. No damage was done to the valves or culvert in its passage. 
The screen was sent to Balboa shops and availalde parts were used in bidlding a 
new screen. 

The opening in front of valve No. 407 was not wide enough to take a bulkhead, so 
the valve was replaced on December 10, 1919. after having been overhauled. The 
side seals were overhauled, and the roller trains were in good condition and were 
replaced. The end rollers were overhauled, the bottom planed and the valve coated 
with Navy enamel. 

On valve No. 406 the l)ottom seal was planed, end rollers overhauled, slide seals 
overhauled and scraped and the valve coated with hermastic enamel. Rebuilt 
roller trains were installed. The valve was replaced on January 2, 1920. 

Valve No. 408 was removed on January 6, 1920. The valve and roller train were 
rusty but not badly pitted. Rebuilt roller trains were installed. The side seals were 
overhauled, as well as the end rollers, and the valve was then coated with hermastic 
enamel. It was replaced on January 21, 1920. 

The roller trains for the guard valves covered above were in very good condition. 
They were all rusty but were not badly pitted and the roller bearings were not badly 
worn. Roller trains Nos. 406 and 408 were used on the rising stem valves and rebuilt 
trains installed in their place. 

Bulkheads. — Bulkheads were installed in the upper end of the east culvert on 
December 9, 1919, and in the lower end on December 12, 1919. The bulkheads at 
the upper end were removed on January 23, 192fK and the lower end on January 24, 
1920. 

The center culvert entrance bulkheads were removed in both the upper and lower 
chambers and seals renewed complete, almendra being used. The enamel on these 
bulkheads was in very good condition and touching up only was done. 

OVERHAULING AT PEDRO MIGUEL. 

The caisson was simk at the lower end of the west chamber at Pedro Miguel locks 
on Feltruary 11, 1920. It was floated again on March 25, 1920, after completion of 
the overhauling work in that chamber. The general condition of the submerged 
parts, as found on inspection after the lock was unwatered. and a report of the mainte- 
nance work on them are covered under each item. 

Miter gates. — The exterior surfaces of these gates had been coated with NaA-y enamel 
in the early part of 1917, and toucliing up only was required at this time. The 
exterior surfaces were in very good condition and showed no signs of deterioration 
except on the miter faces and at the quoins, which showed considerable corrosion 
and pitting. These were thorovighly cleaned and given one coat of red lead paint and 
a heavy coat of "Grater" compound. Thn bitumastic on the interior of gates Nos. 
64, 65, 72, and 73 was touched up. 

It was found that the teredo had been extremely active in all gate sills. The sills 
for gates Nos. 68 and 69 were renewed in their entirety, 25 linear feet of the sill at the 
quoin ond of No. 72. and 12 feet each at the miter ends of Nos. 72 and 73 were nmewed. 
Almendra was used on all this work. 

Repairs were made to the fenders at the tops of the gates, 96 linear feet of fenders 
being renewed. 

Rising stem v dves. — All center wall rising stem valves, with the exception of Nos. 
312 and 'A 13, and all the west side wall valves were removed for overhauling. All end 
rollers had to l)e removed, overhauled, and relined. The rivets in the valves were in 
good condition. A numbcjr of the side s(ki1 springs w(fre broken, and valve No. 330 
required a comph'ti; set of new springs. Some of the roller trains were worn and had 
to be replaced. The bottoms of the valves were planed to a true surface where 
necessary. 

Before the valves were replaced they were thoroughly cleaned and the bitumastic 
gone over. Some of the valves required an entire new coat of bitumastic. 

' '/lindrical valves. — The cylindricial valves were in good condition. The leather 
sells were replaced with rubber seals on all valves of the west cham])er. The bitu- 
mastic on all valves of the west chamber was touched up. 



EEPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



47 



Guard valves. — The screens were bent out of shape and had to be pulled through 
the intake openings with a towing locomotive. They were then sent to Balboa shops 
to be used in connection with making new screens. The guard valves were all in 
good condition. However, they had never been coated with bitumastic and had to 
betaken out for this purpose. 

The roller trains for guard valves Nos. 309 and 311 were used on the rising stem 
valves, rebuilt trains being installed in their place. 

Pedro Miguel Locks. 
LOCKAGES. 







Northbound. 






Southbonnd. 






















Total 




















Months. 


Com- 


Army 


Canal 




Com- 


Army 


Canal 




both 




mer- 


and 


equip- 


Total. - 


mer- 


and 


equip- 


Total. 






cial. 


Navy. 


ment. 




cial. 


Navy. 


ment. 






1919. 




















July 


90 
99 
100 
123 
92 
115 


11 

2 

1 
1 
5 


14 
5 
11 
12 


115 
106 
111 
136 

98 
127 


90 
76 

S7 
144 


43 
20 

6 
11 
10 

6 


20 
13 
18 
14 
16 
14 


131 
123 
100 
102 
113 
1G4 


246 


Aueust 


229 


Seotember 


211 


October 


238 


November 


211 


Pecember 


291 


1920. 




















January 


119 


2 


9 


1.30 


107 


12 


16 


135 


265 


February 


93 


7 


15 


115 


,S4 


11 


9 


104 


219 


March 


95 


2 


9 


106 


101 


4 


17 


122 


228 


April 


105 


6 


9 


120 


107 


4 


13 


124 


244 


May 


117 


3 


9 


129 


102 


7 


12 


121 


250 


June 


91 


2 


10 


103 


100 


9 


15 


124 


227 


Total 


1, 239 


42 


115 


1, 396 


1,143 


143 


177 


1,463 


2,859 







VESSELS. 



1919. 
July 


95 
100 
100 
123 

92 
120 

126 
109 
112 
113 
120 
97 


16 
6 

1 
2 
S 
6 

5 
IS 

7 
10 

6 

5 


41 
13 
31 
29 
19 
22 

22 
38 
23 
27 
24 
25 


152 
119 
132 
154 
119 
148 

153 
165 
142 
150 
150 
127 


68 
90 
77 
78 
92 
146 

116 
101 
127 
116 
105 
104 


62 
33 
12 
20 
17 
12 

27 
28 
15 
9 
15 
12 


36 
24 
31 

27 
28 
35 

30 
24 
32 
22 
24 
24 


166 
147 
120 
125 
137 
193 

173 
153 
174 
147 
144 
140 


313 


August 


2o'i 


September 


252 


October 


279 


November 


256 


December 


341 


1920. 
January 


326 


Febraar v 


318 


March . ." 


316 


April 


297 


May 


2M 


June 


257 






Total 


1,307 


90 


314 


1,711 


1,220 


262 


337 


1,819 


3,530 



48 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Miraflores Locks. 

LOCKAGES. 





Northbound. 


Southbound. 


Total 
both 
ways. 


Months. 


Com- 
mer- 
cial. 


Army 
and 

Navy. 


Canal 
equip- 
ment. 


Total. 


Com- 
mer- 
cial. 


Army 

and 
Navy. 


Canal 
equip- 
ment. 


Total. 


1919. 
July 


,84 
92 
93 

118 
92 

108 

110 
96 
96 
104 
115 
96 


10 
2 

1 

1 
5 

2 

2 
7 
3 
2 


14 

12 
11 

4 
5 

7 

10 
4 

8 
8 
8 


108 
100 
105 
1.30 
97 
118 

119 
113 
102 
119 
126 
106 


67 
85 
72 
76 
83 
124 

91 
92 
107 
102 
101 
104 


42 
19 

5 
10 
10 

6 

11 
10 

4 
4 
8 
9 


17 
13 

19 
13 
13 
9 

12 
1 
13 
15 
10 
U 


126 
117 

96 

99 

106 

139 

114 
103 
124 
121 
119 
124 


234 


Ausiust . 


217 


September 


201 


October 


229 


November 


203 


December 


''57 


1920. 
January 


233 


February 


216 


March 


226 




240 


Mav 


245 


June 


230 






Total 


1,204 


42 


97 


1,343 


1,104 


138 


146 


1,388 


2,731 







VESSELS. 



1919. 
July 


96 
100 

99 
123 

92 
120 

126 
109 
112 
113 
120 
98 


16 
6 
1 
2 

11 
6 

5 
18 

S 
13 

8 

7 


33 
12 
31 
30 
15 
26 

18 
31 
18 
23 
23 
27 


145 
118 
131 
155 
118 
152 

149 
158 
138 
149 
151 
132 


69 
90 
75 
78 
92 
146 

116 
101 
127 
116 
105 
105 


62 
33 
12 
20 
19 
12 

26 
28 
16 
13 
17 
13 


33 
23 
31 
29 
24 
34 

25 
18 
29 
25 
24 
24 


164 
146 

lis 

127 
135 
192 

167 
147 
172 
154 
146 
142 


309 


Auijust 


264 


September 


249 


October 

November 

December 

1920. 
Jam uirv 


282 
253 
344 

316 




305 




310 




303 


May 


297 




274 






Total 


1,308 


101 


287 


1,696 


1,220 


271 


319 


1,810 


3,506 







Pacific Locks. 
LOCKING OPERATIONS 





I'edro Miguel locks. 


Miraflores locks. 




North. 


South. 


Total. 


North. 


South. 


Total. 


Lockages: 

Commercial lockages- 


1,230 
8 
1 


1,130 
9 
4 


2,360 
17 
5 


1,196 
7 

1 


1,093 
8 
3 


2,289 




15 




4 






Total commercial lockages 


1,239 


1,143 


2,382 


1,204 


1,104 


2,308 


Noncommercial lockages— 


115 
42 


177 
143 


292 
185 


97 
42 


146 
138 


243 


U.S. Navy and U.S. Army 


180 


Total noncommercial lockages.. . 


157 


320 


477 


139 


284 


423 


Commercial lockages in which non- 
commercial vessels were included... 


132 


102 


234 


140 


122 


262 


Summary— 


1,239 
157 


1,143 
320 


2,382 
477 


1,204 
139 


1,104 

284 


2,308 




423 








1,396 


1,463 


2,859 


1,343 


1,388 


2,731 







REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



49 



Pacific Locks — Continued. 
LOCKING OPERATIONS— Continued. 





Pedro Miguel locks. 


Miraflores locks. 




North. 


South. 


Total. 


North. 


South. 


Total. 


Vessels: 

Conunerolal vessels 


1,297 
10 


1,210 
10 


2,507 
20 


1,298 
10 


1,210 
10 


2,508 


Commercial launches 


20 








1,307 


1,220 


2,527 


1,308 


1,220 


2,528 






Noncommercial vessels (canal) 

Noncommercial barges (canal) . 


47 

71 

129 

67 

68 
1 
5 

16 


46 
52 
177 
62 

216 

8 

22 

16 


93 
123 
306 
129 

284 

9 

27 

32 


42 
56 
123 
66 

68 
2 
5 

26 


43 
42 
174 
60 

215 

9 
22 
25 


85 
98 


Noncommercial tugs (canal) 


297 


Noncommercial laimches (canal) 

Noncommercial vessels (tF. S. Navy 
and U. S. Army) 


126 

283 


Noncommercial barges (U. S. Navy 
and U. S. Army) 


11 


Noncommercial tugs (U. S. Navy and 
U. S. Army) 


27 


Noncommerciallaunches (U. S. Navy 
and U. S . A rmy) 


51 






Total noncommercial vessels 


404 


599 


1,003 


388 


590 


978 


Summary— 

Commercial vessels 


1,307 
404 


1,220 
599 


2,527 
1,003 


1,308 
388 


1,220 
590 


2,528 


Noncommercial vessels 


978 






Total vessels 


1,711 


1,819 


3,530 


1,696 


1,810 


3,506 







Annual report of water drawn from Gatun and Miraflores Lakes for lockages and other 

purposes. 

[In thousands of cubic feet.] 



Month. 



Pedro Miguel. 



Lockages. 



Leakage. 



Other 
purposes. 



Miraflores. 



Lockages. 



Leakage. 



Other 
purposes. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920. 

January 

Febniary 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total for year 



787,600 


25,930 


722,020 


28,980 


633,280 


29,520 


748,650 


30,500 


704, 160 


35,420 


1,030,990 


48,800 


884,930 


33,540 


620,950 


23,530 


705,760 


16,770 


714,600 


17,710 


696,200 


18,300 


635,370 


17,800 



13,850 
3,810 
27,390 



39.970 



92, 140 
119,030 
62, 740 
61,980 
19,080 



707,190 
652, 910 
607, 600 
704, 900 
629, 880 
769,740 



740,650 
667,860 
726,590 
748, 110 
740,710 
698,390 



13,500 
14,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



8,884,510 



326,800 



439, 990 



8,394,530 



177,500 



8,240 
14,010 
57, 810 



13,500 
8.070 



2,610 

4,920 

890 



110,050 



Atlantic Locks, 
organization and personnel, 

Mr. E. D. Stillwell continued as superintendent throughout the year, and Mr. 
H. M. Thomas as assistant superintendent. During the absence of the superintenden t 
on 100 days' leave in the United States from May 30, 1920, his duties were assumed 
by the assistant superintendent. 

Mr. P. R. Kiger, who was honorably discharged from the United States Army 
August 8, 1919, was assigned to his former position as electrical supervisor October 
28, 1919. Mr. A. E. Wood, who was appointed electrical supervisor during the ab- 

8847—20 4 



50 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



sence of Mr. Kiger, was demoted to assistant electrical supervisor November 
4, 1919. 

Mr. F. M. Easter continued as mechanical supervisor until June 24, 1920, when he 
was transferred to the Gatun lighthouse subdivision. This position has not been 
filled. 

Mr. A. M. Butcher, who was honorably discharged from the United States Army- 
October 12, 1919, and reported for duty November 20, 1919, was assigned to his former 
position as general operator. 

The supervisory force was increased by two additional assistant supervisors, one 
mechanical and one electrical, effective May 5, 1920. 

The general organization remained the same as throughout the previous y-ear, there 
being a few changes in the personnel of the locomotive operators to take care of resig- 
nations and transfers. 

A strike was called by the silver employees on February 22, 1920, and only nine 
silver employees reported for duty February 23, but with the cooperation and loyal 
support of the gold force, lockages were carried on without any delay until March 
4, 1920, by which date the majority of the silver men had returned to work. 

OPERATION. 

""Practically the same system of operation continued in effect as during the previous 
year. 

Delays to Canal traffic due to faulty operation or failure of operating equipment 
have been few and of negligible magnitude. From a total of 3,047 vessels passed 
through Gatun locks the total delay was 4 hours and 26 minutes. 

A report of lockages by months is as follows: 



Month. 



Northbound. 



Com- 
mercial. 



Noncom- 
mercial. 



Total. 



Southbound. 



Com- 
mercial. 



Noncom- 
mercial. 



Total. 



Grand 
total. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



95 
97 

120 
89 

114 



118 
93 
90 
96 

115 
91 



106 
100 

99 
124 

96 
121 



128 
98 
97 
103 
121 
94 



64 
86 
71 
72 
83 
138 



103 
89 

113 
98 
95 
94 



110 
107 
77 
87 
96 
147 



113 
101 
124 
102 
103 
105 



216 
207 
176 
211 
192 



241 
199 
221 
205 
224 
199 



1,204 



83 



1,287 



1,106 



166 



1,272 



2,559 



Total amount of water used for lockage purposes, 10,293,170,000 cubic feet. 

Average number of lockages per day, 6.99 plus. 

Average amount of water used per lockage, 4,022,340 cubic feet plus. 

Average number of commercial vessels per day, 6.923. 

The emergency dams were operated each month for the purpose of instructing 
operators. No emergency operations were necessary. 

No operation of a chain fender machine due to ship striking the chain occurred 
during the year. 

Both lock chambers were in service during the entire year, with the exception of a 
few days when minor repairs and painting were being done on the gates and valvee, 
and then at the convenience of traffic. 

Tlie battle cruiser Renown, with the Prince of Wales, passed through the locks, 
southbound, March 30, 1920. This ship has a length of 795 feet and displacement of 
33,379 tons, which is greater in length and displacement than any vessel transiting 
the Canal to 'date. 

MAINTENANCE. 

All machines and equipment were maintained in good condition. A few changes 
of a minor nature were made in order to improve operating conditions and reduce 
the work of maintenance. 

Emer(/ency dams. — Both dams were painted, except gates and girders, with one 
coat of linseed oil and one coat of gray paint. 



EEPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 51 

A 500-watt lamp and reflector was installed on both dams for lighting inclines. 

Fenders. — One hundred and nine fenders of native hard wood (almendra) were 
installed on approach walls during the year. 

Locomotives and trades. — An 8-foot section of steel conductor rail was replaced with 
copper rail on both side wall return tracks at foot of long inclines. 

The steel rail was badly corroded from the salt water splaslung into slots. 

The conductor rails, covers, brackets and switches on towing and return tracks 
were overhauled and painted. 

A new traction motor was installed in locomotive No. 656. 

Tomng track and return track rail joints were realigned and concreted in wliere 
necessary during the year. 

Rising stem valves and machines. — The 12 intermediate valves and 24 roller trains 
were OA'erhauled during the year. 

Guard valve motor stator No. 269 was renewed on account of short-circuited coil. 

New motor shaft couplings were installed on Nos. 254 and 255. 

Renewed side seals on No. 249 and one seal on No. 248. 

Filling plugs were installed on all dash pots. 

A new removable lintle casting was installed in pit No. 243. Z bars were aligned 
and concreted in. 

Miter gates and machines. — Sump pumps, motors and wiling were removed from all 
miter gates. 

Heating lights were installed in all miter gate macliines and hand rail motors. 

Chain fender machines. — Shortened chain on No. 801, 4 links removed. 

Steel chains on Nos. 800, 801, 802, and 803 were transferred to the intermediate 
maclunes Nos. 808, 809, 810, 811, as the chains on the former were worn considerably 
on the side of links that come in contact with the concrete at bottom of locks. 

New banjo signal was installed on No. 810. 

Brass plates were installed on cores of all main contactor relays to prevent them 
from holding closed by residual magnetism. 

Lighting system. — The lighting conduit in lower cross-under tunnel was renewed 
and the conduit in center wall vertical shaft was taken out. 

Conduit pipes were renewed and lead-covered wires pulled into lamp posts Nos. 
9, 10, 31, 32, and 188. 

Approximately 400 feet of the jute-covered telephone cable were replaced by lead- 
covered conductor. 

Miscellaneo^is. — Continued making up parts and assembling disconnect switches 
for towing track feeders. Switches have been installed in transformer rooms, 1 in 
No. 749, 2 in No. 746, 2 in No. 742, 2 in No. 750, and 1 in No. 752. 
_ Terminal Ijoards were installed on receivers of No. 7 and No. 8 miter gates and 
rising stem valves Nos. 226 and 227 in the control house. 

Renewed spare oil switch No. 6 in transformer room No. 752. 

Made new duct line and installed 2/0-3 conductor lead-covered power cable to 
shop building. Old feeder No. 7526 from the west wall was pulled out for the above. 

Continued retaping busses and bell terminals on machine panels. 

Side wall bulkheads were painted and new hard wood (almendra) sills were 
installed. 

Overhauled main culvert sump pump. A recess cover, seat and base with anchor 
bolts for base were installed in regulating valve room at north end of center wall for 
storage of pump. 

The center wall bulkheads were dipped in crude oil and stored on platform back 
of the northwest side wall, lower level. A concrete vat 15 feet square by 15 inches 
deep and storage platform was built for this purpose. 

A short circuit switch for use in starting the air compressor or motor was made and 
installed. This switch short circuits the series transformer and cuts out the relays 
while the motor is getting up to speed. 

A board showing the primary power and lighting feeders to all transformer rooms 
was completed and installed in the control house. 

Two ventilator shafts were installed in transformer rooms Nos. 756 and 753 for 
ventilation of rooms and operating tunnel. 

Concrete sheds were constructed over the east and west wall locomotive repair pits. 

The wood flooring was removed from the work shops; east, west, and center walls 
and concrete beams were installed. 

Painting gates. — The top of all miter gates and handrails were painted during the 
year. 

The north side, upper section of miter gates Nos. 9 and 10, were enameled with 
hermastic enamel. 

Tunnel floors. — Tunnel floors were painted, in the middle and lower levels, east, 
west, and center walls. 



52 the panama canal. 

Building Division. 

The details of the operations of the building division during the 
fiscal year are covered in the report of the resident engineer, which 
follows : 

Building Division. 

T. C. Morris, Resident Engineer. 

The following report of operations for this division for the fiscal year ended June 
30, 1920, is submitted herewith. 

organization. 

On June 30, 1919, the subdivision of pier construction engaged in the construction of 
Pier No. 6 was abolished and all work of that diA"ision was placed under the super- 
vision of Mr. J. B. Fields as superintendent of construction. 

Mr. C. A. Nelson, formerly superintendent of construction of Pier No. 6, had been 
engaged on the construction of a pier for the Colombian Government and his resigna- 
tion was submitted and accepted on September 25. 

PERSONNEL. 

Mr. H. Rowe resigned from his position as resident engineer on August 14, and 
the undersigned was appointed as his successor. 

The building division was placed under the jurisdiction of the engineer of mainte- 
xiance on that date. 

Mr. S. M. Hitt continued as architect. 

Mr. F. W. Blackwood, assistant engineer in charge of designs, resigned on August 
21 to accept a position with the Colombian Government. 

Mr. A. Hall, as super\isor, was placed in charge of construction of Fort Clayton 
Army post, and Mr. P. J. Corrigan, as super\'isor, at Fort Davis. 

building operations. 

Work was continued on Pier No. 6; Coco Solo submarine base; naval air station, 
Coco Solo; Army aAdation base, France Field. 

New projects started during the year were barracks, quarters, and wharf at Fort 
Sherman; Fort Davis and Fort Clayton Army posts; New silver townsite. Mount Hope; 
lighthouse at channel end of east breakwater; Colon-Cristobal incinerator plant; 
combined shop and storehouse, Cristobal mole; Panama Railroad stables, Colon; 
reconstruction of Royal Mail pier for use of Panama Railroad; concrete oil tanks; 
commimity house, National Catholic War Council; Royal Mail office building. 

PIER NO. 6. 

Construction of Pier No. 6 was completed and turned over to the receiAing and 
forwarding agent for use on August 27, 1919. 

At the beginning of the rainy season, some complaints were received on account 
of leakage of the roof. Expansion and contraction of the roof, due to temperature 
changes, were sufficient to cause slight temperature cracks in the 4-inch roof slab. 
This roof consists of a reinforced concrete slab 4 inches thick, 160 feet wide, and 945 
feet long. Since this pier is used for the storage of freight in transit, and any damage 
to goods would result in claims against the Panama Railroad, it was decided to pre- 
vent, so far as possible, all possibilities of claims resulting from wetting, and the 
application of a five-ply tar and gravel Barrett Specification roof was authorized. 
Owing to the necessity of flashing each pier supporting the cargo-handling crane rail, 
and also owing to the large number of skylights, this tar and gravel roofing will be rather 
costly per square of roof covered. It is necessary to pro\'ide copper flashing for 720 
of the crane rail piers and also to build copper framework to support the 210 sky- 
lights. These skylights originally consisted of 14 liy 24 inch wire ribbed glass set in 
a i by f-inch rabbet with top surface of the glass flush with the surface of the concrete 
slab. The estimated cost of flashing and applying the tar and gravel roof is 126,000, 
or $17 per square, and work was 50 per cent completed on July 1. 

On the morning of March 6, 1920, an explosion occurred on the steamship Marne, 
which was moored along the north side of the pier. This explosion resulted in the 
blowing in of 6 doors, 3 louvers, and 11 windows on the north side, and the vacuum 
caused by the explosion pulled in 6 doors on the south side of the j^ier. Several 
pieces of d6bris were thrown in the air, some of which fell on the roof slab. One 
piece, consisting of a ventilator funnel and the gearing for operating same— a total 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 55 

weight of 800 pounds — fell astride one of the longitudinal reinforced concrete trusses 
and broke holes in the roof slab on both sides of the truss. A careful inspectioa 
showed no damage to the truss. 

NAVAL SUBMARINE BASE AND NAVAL AIR STATION. 

Work was continued on these projects in accordance with original plans and sub- 
sequent request of the Navy Department. The total expenditure during the fiscal 
j-'ear for the submarine base was $147,317, and for the naval air station $91,919. 

ARMY AVIATION BASE, FRANCE FIELI;. 

All work was completed on the officers' quarters and barracks, as covered by the 
$385,400 appropriation, and additional work as requested by the Army, consisting 
principally of the erection of one steel hangar, 110-foot span by 200 feet long, and one 
steel hangar 66-foot span by 140 feet long. The total expenditure at this base during 
the year was $66,954. 

BARRACKS, QUARTERS, AND WHARF, FORT SHERMAN. 

New work authorized under the $140,000 appropriation for barracks and quarters 
was completed. This work consisted of the construction of two type-20 staff quarters,- 
tv,-o type EE-2 officers' quarters, two 150-men barracks, including exterior electricaF- 
workand municipal work. The total expenditm-e on this project was $125,715.10... 

The construction of the wharf authorized under the $35,000 appropriation was 
completed at a cost of $25,501.08. 

FORT D.WIS AND FORT CLAYTON ARMY POSTS. 

The Army building program for the fiscal year 1919-20 provided for the construction^, 
of quarters and barracks to accommodate one regiment of Infantry at Fort Clayton, 
Miraflores dump, and one regiment of Infantry at Fort Davis, New Gatun. 

A general description of the buildings constructed was given in the last annual 
report and all buildings were constructed in accordance with the specifications as 
outlined. 

On Marches, 1919, the Governor of The Panama Canal advieed the chief of office 
as follows with reference to the construction of these two Army posts: 

"Canal has organization and ec^uipment to commence work within two weeks'' 
after location is approved and can carry out project by July 1, 1920. " 

This allowed a 15-month period for construction. 

Funds were finally allotted to The Panama Canal on April 23 and the project was- 
definitely approved on ]\Iay 19. Work was started at Miraflores on May 20. 

The total amount appropriated for Fort Davis and Fort ('layton projects was- 
$4,986,849, of which amount the building division was allotted $2,851,600, the elec- 
trical division $212,000, and the municipal di"\dsion $842,000, leaving an unexpended 
balance of $81,649. 

A clause in the appropriation act requiring the Governor of The Panama Canal to- 
purchase needed materials, supplies, and equipment from various surplus stores^ 
of the War Department, so far as available, resulted in considerable delay in de- 
livery of material. Specific instances of this are shown below. Requisitions 
for these materials were forwarded to the United States on June 23, 1919. It was 
then necessary for the general purchasing officer in Washington to commxunicate 
with the various surplus stores of the construction di\dsion of the Army in an 
attempt to purchase the needed material from these stores. In some instances, sup- 
plies were actually contracted for on the assumption that materials were available, 
but when actual shipment of material was to begin, none could be found. It was 
then necessary to cancel the order, advertise for purchase from commercial firms, 
and award bids. The tabulation below indicates some of the difficulties: 



Commodity. 


Requisition 
forwarded. 


Delivery 
promise'd. 


First 
phipment 
roceivod. 


Roof tile 


June 23,1919 
do . . 


Oct. 8,1919 
Nov. fi,l919 
Oct. 5,1919 
Nov. 1,1919 
Nov. 3,1919 
Nov. 10,1919 
Oct. 29,1919 


Dec 6 1919 


Hardware 


Nov 17' 1919 


Plumbing fixtures 


..do . . 


Oct 211919 


Plumbing fittings 


do 


Dec is' 1919 


Scullerv sinks 


do .. 


July 10' 1920 
Feb 21 1920 


Millwork 


do 


Limiber 


do . . 


Dec 2G 1919 









54 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Similar difficulties were also encountered on requisitions for skilled mechanics. 
Of 15 carpenters requisitioned for on the 1st of May, final arrival was not effected 
until September 5. Of 31 carpenters requisitioned for on August 12, final arrival 
was accomplished on December 2, and of 31 carpenters requisitioned for on May 4, 
final arrival was effected on June 26. The same difficulty was experienced with 
plasterers, plumbers, painters, bricklayers, and sheet-metal workers. Some of these 
delays in procuring men were due to the fact that the authorized rates of pay for 
skilled mechanics in the building trades at times were as much as five months in 
arrears of base rates in the States. For instance, the rates of pay effective on October 
1, 1919, were not authorized until February 5, 1920, and the rates of pay effective 
February 1, 1920, were authorized on June lO, 1920. 



Unprecedented advances have occurred during the past fiscal year in the prices 
of both materials and labor. The following table shows the rates paid for skilled 
mechanics at the time estimates for these projects were prepared, which was June 25, 
1917, the rates of pay when final plans of construction were made, on June 1, 1919, 
and the rates of pay in effect on June 1, 1920: 





Journeymen's rates. 








Craft. 


Estimate 

prepared 

June 25, 

1917. 


Plans 
made for 

con- 
struction 
June 1, 
1919. 


In effect 

June 1, 

1920. 




$0.88 
.86 
.84 
.74 
.74 
.71 


SI. 09 

1.09 

1.04 

.95 

1.03 

.91 

.95 


$1.34 




1.35 




1.30 




1.22 




1.03 




1.19 




1.07 









The actual increase in cost due to these increases in gold journeymen's rates over 
the rates in effect on July 1, 1919, are shown for the various crafts in the accompany- 
ing tables (Table No. 1 for Fort Clayton and Table No. 2 for Fort Davis), and the 
increases due to advances in rates for silver employees are shown on Table No. 3. 
The total amounts are as follows: 



Fort Clayton: 

Gold $49,632.22 

Silver 25,079.89 



Fort Davis: 

Gold $57,619.20 

Silver 25, 755.40 



Total 74,712.11 Total 83,274.60 

The increased costs of two of the principal commodities, lumber and roof tile, are 
shown in the table below. These increases are based on storehouse prices of July 
1, 1919. 





Fort Clayton. 


Fort Davis. 


Commodit}'. 


Amount. 


Per cent 
increase. 


Amount. 


Per cent 
increase. 


Lumber 

Roof tile 


$27,434 
26,665 


18.3 
4.5.6 


$38,985 
26, 665 


25.9 
45.6 







Total value of material used on these projects during the year was $630,467 at 
"Fort Clayton and $632,831 at Fort Davis. Other commodities increased in price 
at vairious rates. 

Owing to delay in starting the projects, in delivery of materials, and in the arrival 
of skilled mechanics, the Army posts were not completed by July 1, 1920. At 
Fort Clayton all buildings were completed except headquarters, which is 85 per 
cent ccanplete, one battalion barracks, 85 per cent, and one battalion barracks, 70 
per cent; while at Fort Davis all buildings were completed except as follows: One 
2-family captain's set, 84 per cent complete; one 2-family captain's set, 50 per cent 



KEPORT OF EITGIlSrEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



55 



complete; one 4-family lieutenant's, 90 per cent; one 4-family lieutenant's, 80 per 
cent; headquarters building, 95 per cent; one battalion barracks, 70 per cent; and 
one battalion barracks, 60 per cent. 

By August 1, 1920, these projects will be completed, except at Fort Clayton, one 
battalion barracks, 90 per cent, and at Fort Davis, one battalion barracks, 90 per cent. 

Table No. 4, attached, shows the estimated and actual time in man-days for the 
various crafts for each building. Similar charts were prepared semimonthly, from 
which the force required to complete the work was computed. 

The total expenditures for building di^^sion work to July 1, 1920. was as follows: 





Labor. 


^^aterial. 


Other 
charges. 


Total. 


Fort Clavton 


$508, 019 
520, 783 


$630, 467 
6.32,831 


$177, 932 
161, 582 


$1 316 418 


Fort Davis 


1 315 196 







This leaves a balance of $109,382 at Fort Clayton and $110,604 at Fort Davis. Pres- 
ent estimates indicate that these posts will be completed within the appropriation. 

NEW SILVER TO WNSITE, MOUNT HOPE. 

On July IS, 1919. authority was given for the construction of 49 buildings at Mount 
Hope at an estimated cost of $441,000. Thirty-nine of these buildings were to be of 
standard Panama Canal 12-family frame quarters for silver employees, and 10 standard 
Panama Canal 32-room frame quarters for silver liachelor employees. Work was not 
started on this projert until January 1, 1920, and then only with a limited force, 
owing to inability of securing building materials. The x^roject as a whole was 54 per 
cent complete on this date, "the total expenditure to July 1 being $236. 628.26. 

In connection with this project, there was also authorized the construction of a 
silver commissary, of sufficient capacity to provide for future development of the 
townsito. This commissary is typical of the silver commissaries on the Canal Zone 
except that boots and shoes, hardware, and dry goods will be sold on the second floor. 
A 3-ton capacity freight elevator will be installed for handling goods to the second 
floor and a modern electric-driven refrigerating apparatus will be installed for refrig- 
erating the cold-storage section. The estimated cost of this commissary is $43,000. 
Work on July 1 was 75 per cent completed; cost was $32,291.20. 

LIGHTHOUSE AT CHANNEL END OF EAST BREAKWATER. 

On September 9, 1919. authority was given the building division for the construc- 
tion of a foundation for a 100-foot lighthouse at the channel end of east breakwater 
and for the purchase and erection of a lighthouse tower. 

Proprietary purchase was authorized for a 100-foot steel tower similar to the one 
constructed at Punta Mala, and on October 8, 1919, contract was awarded for this 
tower at the price of $6,500. delivered in Colon. Contractors' drawings were received 
on February 3, giving the dimensions of the base of the tower and sufficient data for 
computing loads on tower base. 

The foundation consists of a 23-foot 7-inch square reinforced-concrete deck designed 
for a live load of 150 pounds per square foot and supported on four sides by a reinforced- 
concrete beam 7 feet deep and 2 feet thick. Twelve ,steel-type piles, three at each 
corner, with cast-iron shoes, were driven to rock at elevation minus 115 feet. These 
piles were driven with a floating driver equipped with an 1,800-pound falling part 
steam hammer. The depth of the water at this lighthouse was 20 feet and upon 
filling the pipe piles with concrete, reinforcing cages consisting of 10 |-inch round 
reinforcing bars were lowered to elevation minus 30. thus pro\iding the reinforced- 
concrete pile support whenever the steel pipe has rusted away. The construction of 
this foundation was completed on June 22, and latest ad\ice received from the States 
was on July 26, stating that steel tower had been completed and passed inspection 
and material was en route to the Isthmus. 

COLON-CRISTOBAL INCINERATOR PLANT. 

Work was commenced on the construction of a 60-ton daily capacity garbage incin- 
erator located about 2,000 feet east of the east diversion on the Mount Hope-Fort 
Randolph road. This site was selected to allow for future development of the new 
silver townsite at Moimt Hope. The building housing tliis plant is 37 feet 3 inches 
by 101 feet 3 inches, two stories high, reinforced-concrete construction with tile roof. 
The first floor contains two 30-ton units consisting of water-jacketed steel furnaces, 
together with preheaters induced and forced-draft fans, feed water pumps, and fuel 



56 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

oil pumps. The second floor is of reinforced concrete designed to support a live load 
of 200 pounds per square foot, and will l)e used for the storage of garbage and its selec- 
tion for proper incineration. 

Garbage will be delivered to the plant in motor trucks with removable steel bodies. 
These bodies of 2^ yards capacity will be lifted from the trucks by an overhead trav- 
eling electrically operated crane and the contents will be either dumj^ed directly 
into the incinerator hopper or stored imtil such time as furnace conditions warrant 
charging. 

The plant is provided with a platform scale for weighing all garbage delivered to 
the plant. 

Steam generated in the incinerator will be used for drying fertilizer and bone meal 
which wdl be manufactured in an adjoining building. On July 1, 1920, this building 
was practically completed, all the equipment was installed, and the work remaining 
to be done consisted of placing the fire-brick lining in the combustion chambers and 
breeching. The estimated cost of this project was $113,000; the cost to July 1, 1920, 
$110,073.52. 

COMBINED SHOP AND STOREHOUSE. CRISTOrSAL MOLE. 

A combined shop and storehouse is under construction on the Cristobal Mole to 
provide a 76 by 113 foot shop for the mechanical division for small marine work and 
also a storeroom for the supply department, 76 by 126 feet, for ships' stores. The 
supply department end of this building will be two stories high, and the second floor, 
having an area of 141 by 76 feet, will be available for rental to steamship companies 
for ships' supplies. Toilets are provided for gold and silver employees. A 3-ton 
freight elevator will handle material to the second floor. The estimated cost of this 
building is $90,000, and on July 1, 1920, it was 52 per cent completed, the total ex- 
penditure to that date being $46,182.33. 

PANAMA RAILROAD STABLES. 

It became necessary, owing to filling of certain lots in Colon, and for the mimicipal 
improvements of the same, to demolish all privately owTied and Panama Railroad 
stables in Colon and reconstruct same between Sixteenth and G Streets and Folks 
River. Authority was accordingly issued for the construction of stables to accommo- 
date 432 horses and the necessary feed rooms, shops, storehouses, wagon sheds, and 
living quarters for attendants. The total estimated cost of this project is $142,000, 
and the total cost at the end of the fiscal year was $118,990. The project as a whole 
was 84 per cent completed. 

EEMODELINO OF THE OLD ROYAL MAIL PIER FOR THE PANAMA RAILROAD FOR NATIVE PRODUCE. 

Circular 512, dated November 11, 1913, requiring the demolition of all nonratproof 
piers by January 1, 1919, resulted in the demolition of the superstructure of the old 
Royal Mail pier. The foimdation of this pier remained intact and m as purchased by 
the Panama Railroad Company, who then authorized the construction of a fireproof 
and ratproof superstructure for the accommodation of small coastwise and native 
craft. Authority was issued on the building division for the designing and construc- 
tion of same. A reinforced concrete slab was designed for 175-pound live load oyer 
the entire structure and was built accordingly, and the area was roofed with material 
salvaged from the old Panama Railroad Pier No. 2. Same was covered with corru- 
gated iron. Sliding doors were installed on both sides of 30-foot centers for the han- 
dling of nati\e produce. Water lines were installed for fire protection and for sup- 
plying water to ships. The area covered by this shed is 60 feet by 400 feet. The 
total cost of the project was $38,247.70. 

CONCRETE OIL TANK?. 

Instructions were issued by the supply department for the construction of two rein- 
forced concrete oil tanks of 55,000 barrels capacity each. These tanks are 115 feet 
inside diameter at the base and 1]6 feet inside diameter at the top. The tanks are 
30 feet deep. The walls are 1 foot thick at the base and 6 inches thick at the top 
and are reinforced spirally with 1^-inch diameter rods. These rods were rolled by 
the mechanical di\ision and a considerable saving was effected in the amount of 
steel used by obtaining these rods in greater lengths than are practical to secure com- 
mercially from the States. Our experience has been tliat 33-foot length reinforcing 
bars are as long as can be shipped conveniently from the States, and the bars as fur- 
nished by the mechanical diA ision were from 40 feet to 70 feet long. The lap splice 
w'as used, necessitating a lap of 5 feet, and the obtaining of this steel in longer lengths 
resulted in a saving of approximately 5,000 feet on the two tanks. 

After the pouring of the reinforced concrete floor slab of this tank the walls were 
poured with inner and outer forms built in 12-foot sections 6 feet in height, and pours 



EEPORT OF EN-GINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 57 

were made on alternating days, the intermediate day being required for the raising of 
the form and the placing or the reinforcing steel. The inner surface was given a rub- 
float finish. 

Two mixers were used for the pouring of these walls and the pouring was so arranged 
that no new material was dumped on material which had been in place for more than 
10 minutes. 

Estimates indicated that a reinforced concrete roof would cost approximately 
one-halt as much as a structural steel roof. A reinforced concrete roof was therefore 
built. This roof is supported by one central column and 12 columns equally spaced 
on a 29-i:oot radius. From the central column 12 beams radiate to this intermediate 
ring of 12 columns, which are tied together at the top by 12 beams, forming a duo- 
decagon. From this frame 24 beams were poured, supported by the wall ot the tank. 
A 4-inch reinforced concrete slab covers the entire area. The estimated cost of these 
tanks is $55,000, and the cost to July 1 was $42,751.39 for the tank at Mount Hope and 
$42,260.83 for the tank at La Boca. The increase in cost of the tank at La Boca is due 
to the fact that it was necessary to excavate 6,000 cubic yards of rock to prepare the 
foundation and to construct a dike and a fire wall. The status on July 1 was: Mount 
Hope tank, 98 per cent completed; La Boca tank, 60 per cent completed. 

MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 

Other work done for The Panama Canal during the past fiscal year was as follows: 

Moving two type-15 houses from Las Cascadas to Balboa and the reerection of same 
as a type-17 cottage for the Seamen's Home. 

Removal of one type-14 residence from Las Cascadas and the reerection of same as a 
dormitory for the Seamen's Home. 

Removal and reerection of seven type-15 cottages and one type-7 two-family house 
from Las Cascadas to Pedro Miguel, at a cost of $21,063 for nine apartments. 

Removal and reerection of three type-18 l^achelor quarters from Las Cascadas to 
Balboa at a cost of $32,208.27. 

Removal of four modified type-7 quarters from Las Cascadas and their reerection as 
one-family houses for jsilots' quarters — two at Gatun and two at Pedro Miguel. 

Removal and reerection of three type-7 quarters from I^^as Cascadas to New Cristo- 
bal, at a cost of $19,397.06 for six apartments. 

The construction of three play sheds tor the bureau ot clubs and playgrounds, one at 
Pedro Miguel, one at Gatun, and one at New Cristobal, at a cost of $10,585.56. 

The conversion of section F, old Ancon Hospital, into 14 family quarters; conver- 
sion of sections 17, 18, 19, and the kitchen of the old Ancon Hospital into 8 family 
quarters; conversion of the old Chinese detention camp into 8 family quarters, at a 
total cost ot $66,441.28 tor 30 apartments; removal from the vicinity ot section F, 
Ancon Hospital, ot the colored maids' quarters to a site nearer the hospital activities. 

The construction of a 60 by 300 foot warehouse for oil drums and waste for the supply 
department, at a cost of $22,607.81. 

The demolition of the old Mount Hope storehouse and the reerection of same as a 
storehouse for the printing plant at Mount Hope, storehouse for the supply department 
at Mount Hope, and as a reclaiming shop and store for the supply department at Balboa . 

The demolition of the wooden section of the old French steel pier at Balboa. 

The painting of the exterior ot all frame quarters in Balboa, La Boca, Pedro Miguel, 
Gatun, and New Cristobal and 30 per cent of the frame buildings in Ancon. 

Painting of the interior of 100 type-17 cottages, 96 type-14 cottages in Ancon and 
Balboa, the interior of all concrete residences in Balboa, the interior of the adminis- 
tration building, and the interior of all quarters in La Boca. 

WORK FOE INDIVIDUALS AND COMPANIES. 

Work was started on the community house for the National Catholic War Council at 
Balboa. The estimated cost of this building is $85,000 and the expenditure to July 1, 
1920, was $28,174.34. 

Work was started on the construction of the office building and quarters for the Royal 
Mail Steam Packet Company. The estimated cost of this building is $275,000 and the 
expenditure up to July 1, 1920, was $57,795.73. 

Work was completed on the office and bachelor quarters in Balboa for the Central 
and South America Cable Company. 

FORCE. 

On July 1, 1919, the force was 205 gold men and 1,530 silver men, a total of 1,735. 
This was increased to the maximum of 2,268 men on November 1, 1919, of which 328 
were on the gold roll and 1,940 on the silver roll. At the end of the fiscal year, June 
30, 1920, the force totaled 1,887 men, of which 512 were on the gold roll and 1,375 
on the silver roll. 



58 



THE PANAMA CANAL.. 











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REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



59 



$2, 793. 20 
1.3,548.00 
6,098.40 
4,588.80 
14, 876. 00 
161. 52 

139.80 
400.00 
508. 00 
388.00 
1,968.00 


(MCO 

■o-co" 


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.-. 

00 

CM (M 




<N 

cf. 

"O 


2,255 
9, f»50 
4,400 
3,260 
10,700 
225 

225 
375 
300 
225 
2,300 


















$810. 00 
6,552.00 
2,017.60 
3,449.60 
7,488.00 

;i 31.68 


144.00 
124. 00 
152. 00 
416.00 


80S 


C4 CD 
TO 'f 


00 

06 


$2.00 
2.08 
2.08 
2.24 
2.08 
.96 

1.84 
1.92 
2.48 
3.04 
2.08 


















Tj« .-< 05 LO CO 

n — "co" 


U5000 
t^ U3 to O 

cs 


















$571.20 

2,964.00 

1,020.80 

576. 00 

2,380.00 

1 45. 12 

3.80 

102. 00 

108. 00 

80.00 

272.00 


c-joo 


CO-fl" 

0- 



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0" 


$1.68 
1.52 
1.76 

.80 
1.36 

.96 

1.52 
1.36 
2.16 
1.60 
1.36 


















OOOOCt^ lOiOOOO 
CC Oi lO t^ t^ cs 


















$600. 00 
2,312.00 
1,216.00 
486. 40 
2,688.00 
S3. 04 

72. no 

90. 00 

96.00 

72.00 

256. 00 




dm 

CO .— < 

r-.0 


CO 

i 


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$1.60 
1.36 
1.52 

.64 
1.28 

.96 

1.44 
1.20 
1.92 
1.44 
1.28 


















to ooooo OlOOOO 

I^OOCOOIO >CI^OOO 

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$788. 00 
1,700.00 
1,716.00 
76.80 
2, 200. 00 
31.68 

64.00 
64.00 

144.00 
84. 00 

880. 00 


06 C^ 

TJH CD 


00" 


00 

1 


$0.80 
.80 
1.04 
.32 
.80 
.96 

.64 
.64 
1.44 
1.18 
.80 


















985 
2,125 
1,650 

240 

2,750 

33 

100 
100 
100 
75 
1,100 


















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CO 





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10 


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60 



THE PANAMA (lANAL. 







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oooo 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 61 

Table No. 4. — Estimated and actual time in man days for various crafts. 



Building name. 



Bricklayers. 



Esti- 
mate. 



Actual. 



Davis. 



Clay- 
ton. 



Plasterers. 



Esti- 
mate. 



Actual. 



Davis. 



Clay- 
ton. 



Rubbers. 



Esti- 
mate. 



Actual. 



Davis. 



Clay- 
ton. 



Headquarters 

Special barracks 

Battalion barracks 

Do 

Do 

Field officers' and captains' 
quarters 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Lieutenant 4-family quarters. 

Do , 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Lieutenant 6-set quarters. .. 

Noncommissioned officers' 

quarters 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Servants' quarters 

Total 



75 

66 

175 

175 

175 

51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
68 



'112i 

61 i 

213i 

19H 

275i 

51J 
5H 

54 

47f 

47f 

58 

58 

51i 

51 

51 

68J 

681 

68i 

68 

71h 

71i 

67i 

26! 

263 

29i 

29i 

43} 

44 

22i 



63 
53i 

noi 

166i 
185f 

42 

42 

43 

431 

54f 

m 

47i 

51 

51 

48 

48i 

49 

67i 

68 

66 

66 

59i 

60 

62i 

30 

30 

30 

30 

29* 

29i 

30 



1, 949 2, ISlf 



1,865J 



187 
205 
595 
595 
595 

167 
167 
167 
167 
167 
167 
167 
167 
167 
167 
167 
167 
192 
192 
192 
192 
192 
192 
183 

59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 



368 
396J 
888i 
788 
1,142 

159^ 

159i 

154i 

154i 

1221 

135 

135 

123i 

123i 

mi 

117i 

117J 

174^ 

174i 

188| 

188J 

191 

191 

165i 



891 
114 
114 

85} 

85} 

54 



305 

230} 

750 

746 

740 

lUJ 
111 

127 

130 

116 

131 

130 

126 

116^ 

117 

117 

117 

161 

176 

158 

1534 

176i 

175 

209} 

65} 

66 

66 

66 

61J 

60 

48 



170 
220 
410 
410 
410 

16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
33 
33 
32 
32 
33 
33 
23 



20 



225} 

238i 

559 

559i 

459^ 

24| 

24 

24 

33f 

24i 

244 

28} 

28} 

18} 

20} 

20} 

38i 

381 

27} 

27 

34 

34 

29} 

12} 

124 

11 

11 

33 

33 

18 



5,918 



7, 108} 



5,863} 



2,051 



2, 697} 



2794 

85 

«248} 

619 

622 

181 

18 

17i 

17 

17} 

10 

10 

11} 

11 

144 

14 

14 

174 

17 

284 

28 

30 

30 

281 

VJ 
6 
64 
54 



2,240} 



1 6,000 more blocks than Fort Clayton headquarters. 

2 Part of the rubbing done by silver labor. 

' 10,000 more blocks than Fort Clayton battalion barracks. 



62 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table No. 4. — Estimated and actual time in man days for various crafts — Continued. 





Carpenters. 


Plumbers. 


Roofers. 


Painters. 


Building name. 


Esti- 
mate. 


Actual. 


Esti- 
mate. 


Actual. 


Esti- 
mate. 


Actual. 


Esti- 
mate. 


Actual. 




Davis. 


Clay- 
ton. 


Davis. 


Clay- 
ton. 


Da- 
vis. 


Clay- 
ton. 


Da- 
^'ls. 


Clay- 
ton. 


Headquarters 

Speml barracks 

Battalion barracks. 
Do 


600 
580 
900 
900 
900 

140 
140 
140 
140 
140 
140 
140 
140 
140 
140 
140 
140 

150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 

140 

138 
138 
138 
138 
138 
138 
96 


8491 

530} 

il,249| 

11,250 

1,371 J 

203} 

203} 

200* 

2004 

191} 

1964 

1964 

170 

170} 

172} 

172} 

172} 

212 

212 

241 

241 

246f 

2461 

216 

163i 
1634 
187} 
187 
193} 
- 193} 
544 


7564 

643 

1,346 

1994 

11,092 

168 
169 
133 
129 
150 
187 
187 
187 
188 
147 
158 
167 

207 

198 

234 

234 

2044 

2064 

2094 

169 
169 
163 
163 
204 
204 
101 


213 

246 
770 
770 
770 

54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
64 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 

57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 

65 

46 
46 
46 
46 
46 
46 
38 


226f 

2(i3* 

1685} 

1685 

636 

62 

62 

56 

57 

654 

53 

54 

56 

56 

58} 

58} 

58} 

63 

63 

76} 

76 

584 

584 

64 

50 

50 

51 

51 

404 

40} 

494 


235} 

231 

7334 

1 760i 

16864 

46} 
46 
53} 
52 
44} 
454 
46 
52 
53 
46 
46 
47f 

514 
52 

64 
564 
55 
55 

36 

35 

414 

41 

374 

38 

68 

564 


48 
53 
80 
80 
80 

9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 

14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 

17 

9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
18 


59} 
94J 
1284 
1204 

20 
20 
18} 
18} 
144 
104 
104 
9} 
9} 
13} 
13 
13 

10 

10 

16 

16 
91 
9f 

9} 

74 
74 
104 
10} 
14 
131 
94 


75 
59| 
884 
77J 
111 

9 

84 
10 
10 
114 
10* 
11 
11 
10 

8 

8 
10 

12 
11 
10 
10 

114 

10 

184 

f 

7 
7 
84 
8 
18 


174 
206 
375 
375 
375 

40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 

45 
45 
45 
45 
45 
45 

38 

81 
81 
81 
81 
81 
81 


249} 
146J 
1375 
1375 
375 

38 

38 

39J 

394 

36J 

54} 

54} 

51* 

514 

51 

51 

51 

424 

424 

45 

45 

52} 

52} 

68| 

32? 
32} 
47} 
47} 
41} 
41} 
36 


195 

174 
314} 
1377 


Do 


13854 


Field ofiScers' and 
captains' quar- 
ters 


57 


Do 


57 


Do 


57 


Do 


584 


Do 


634 


Do 


45* 


Do 


46 


Do 


41 


Do 


40 


Do 


45 


Do 


45 


Do 


46 


Lieutenant 4-fam- 

ilv quarters 

Do 


604 
65 


Do 


47* 


Do 


46 


Do 


574 


Do 


57 


Lieutenant 6-set 


42} 


Noncommissioned 

officers' quarters. 

Do 


57 
60 


Do 


72} 


Do 


72 


Do 


63 


Do 


63 


Servants' quarters. . 


36 


Total 


7,524 


10,258} 


9,234 


4,138 


3,948} 


3,912} 


622 


803i 


679 


2,779 


3,704 


2,835} 



1 Estimated part of thia work. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



63 



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THE PANAMA CANAL.. 



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REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



65 



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8847—20- 



66 the panama canal. 

Dredging Division. 

The details of the operations of the dredging division durinq: the 
fiscal year are covered in the report of the superintendent of dredging, 
which follows : 

Dredgin'g Division. 

/. M. Pratt, Superintendent. 

The following report of operations in the dredging di'V'ision during the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1920, is submitted herewith: 

DIVISION ORGANIZATION. 

All dredging operations embracing Atlantic entrance, Gatun Lake, Gaillard Cut, 
Miraflores Lake, and Pacific entrance sections of the Canal, with aiixiliary dredging 
at the Atlantic and Pacific terminals and Chagres River gravel operations, have been 
handled direct from the division headquarters at Paraiso for the entire year. Field 
offices were maintained at Balboa and Cristobal. 

DREDGING PLANT. 

The following dredges and other floating plant were in operation during the year: 

The 15-yard dipper dredge Paraiso was operated for nine months of the year on 
general maintenance work at East and West Culebra, Gatun Lake, excavatin? and 
deepening channel at Paraiso and Miraflores P. L improvement works, excavating 
material at Cucaracha slide, widening the approach channels to Cristobal Harbor and 
west slip coaling station, and deepening anchorage slips north and south of Pier No. 6, 
Cristobal Harlior. 

The 15-yard dipper dredge Gamboa was operated for seven months of the year 
excavating and deepening the channel at Paraiso P. L improvement works, excavat- 
ing slide material at East Culebra and Cucaracha slides, and widening the approach 
channel to the west slip of Cristobal coaling station. 

The 15-yard dipper dredge Cascadas was engaged nearly 10 months of the year on 
general maintenance and original excavation in Balboa Inner Harbor, and deepening 
the slip between Docks Nos. 7 and 8 and in front of Dock No. 6, Balboa, removing 
shoals at West Culebra and material from Cucaracha slide. 

The French ladder dredge Marmot returned to active service December 8, 1919, and 
for the remainder of the fiscal year was engaged in the sand and gravel service in the 
Chagres River, also removing shoal at the Gamboa dock and uncovering the gravel 
beds. All concrete on the Isthmus is manufactured from sand and gravel obtained 
in this manner. 

The 20-inch pipe-line dredge No. S3 returned to service November 28, 1919, and 
was engaged five and one-half months on general maintenance work in the Canal 
channel at the Pacific entrance and at Miraflores P. I. imjjrovement work. This 
dredge was then retired from dredging operations May 14, 1920. This dredge was used 
from June 21 to 27 to remove coal from a sunken barge and again laid up. 

The 20-inch pipe-line dredge No. 84 was operated for 10 months of the year on general 
maintenance work in the Pacific entrance, Balboa Inner Harbor, including excavat- 
ing in front of Docks Nos. 6 and 7, Balboa Harbor, and removing material in front of 
Cucaracha slide'. 

The 20-inch pipe-line dredge No. 86 was engaged nine months during the year on 
general maintenance work at the Pacific entrance, Balboa Inner Harbor, and excavat- 
ing at Miraflores improvement work, and deepening channel in Gaillard Cut south 
of and at Cucaracha elide. 

The drillboat Teredo No. 2 was engaged for seven and one-half months of the year 
in mining operations at Paraiso and Miraflores P. I. Channel improvement works, 
also in the Pacific entrance channel and in Gaillard Cut at Cucaracha slide. 

The hydraulic grader No. 1 was engaged for 11 months of the year ditching and 
grading West Culebra, including Barge Repair and Lirio slides, and sluicing at 
Cucaracha slide. 

The hydraulic grader JVb. S, retired from service last year, was returned to work 
Noveml)er 1 1919^ and waa engaged in sluicing and grading at Cucaracha slide for the 
remainder of the fiscal year. 

The floating air compressor No. 27 was tied up at Gamboa out of commission from 
July, 1919, to January 31, 1920, and was used in raising the sunken steamship Marne 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



67 



at Cristolial from the latter date to May 7, ]920, and again ri'iired from Rervice May 8, 
1920. 

The 300-ton cranes Hercules and Aiax, with the i ranp boat Ln Valley and wrecking 
barsre No. 91, were operated by the dredging divi4on Iho entire year. 

The seagoing ladder dredge Corozal was tied u|) at Gamlioa frmn July to September, 
1919, and was under repairs at Balboa during y('pteml>er and part of October, 1919. 
This dredge was sold to the United States Engineer Oir:ci>, Philadelphia, Pa., and 
turned over to representatives of that office Novem])e; 7, 1919, and left the Isthmus 
for Philadelphia under tow of the Navy collier Vulcan D -ember 11, 1919. 

There were four tugboats in the dredging service on July 1, 1919. During the fiscal 
year three were loaned to this di\ision between March and July, 1920, by other 
divisions, and at the end of the fiscal year there were seven tugboats in the service. 

A total of 14 launches was operated during the year. 

The following table shows the number of days the dredges were retired from dredg- 
ing service for repairs, alterations, or on detached service: 

Table No. 1. — Number of days dredges ivere retired from dredging service. 



Dredge. 


Type. 


Days 

out of 

service. 


Cause. 


Remarks. 


Paraiso 


15-yard dipper 

do 


42 
29 
89 
44 
19 
30 

90 
155 


Repairs. 

ilido!;!! 

...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 

...do.... 
...do.... 


Tied up (not working) 90 days. 
Tied up (not working) 163 da^-s. 
Tied up (not working). 
Tied up (not working) 51 day,s. 
Tied up (not working) 146 davs. 
Tied up (not working) 164 days. 

Tied up (not working) 2 days. 
Tied up (repairs to relay) 4'days. 


Gamboa 


Gascadas 


do 


Corcza] 


Seagoing ladder . . . 

French ladder 

2.')-mch pipe-lino 
suction. 

do 

do 


Marmot 


No. 83 

No. 84 

No. 86 



DREDGING. 



Dredges operating in the Canal prism, at the Atlantic and Pacific terminals, and in 
the sand and gravel service, removed a total of 4,750,686 culnc yards of material. 

The following table, divided into Canal prism and auxiliary dredging, shows the 
output of each dredge during the year, with the total and unit costs ot same: 

Table No. 2. — Output of all dredges, with total and unit costs. 



Dredges. 


Months 
worked. 




Canal prism dredging. 




Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


Cost. 


Unit cost. 


Dipper: 

Paraiso 


9 
7 
10 


429,785 
204,600 
266,650 


429,425 
334,250 
414,700 


859,210 
538,850 
681,350 


$380,221.93 
300,;:93.34 
257, 330. 84 


$0. 44252 
..55784 
. 37768 


Gamboa 


Cascaaas 




Total 




901,035 


1,178,375 


2,079,410 


938,146.11 


. 45116 






Ladder: 

Marmot 


7 
























Total 














Suction: 

No. 83 


5i 
10 
9 


423, 100 
63.5,600 

528, 200 




423, too 
6 14, 100 
56.;., 200 


67,691.48 

119,40.5.45 
96,902.12 


. 15999 
. 18538 
. 17145 


No. 84 


8,500 
37, 000 


No. 86 




Total 




1,586,900 


45,500 


1,632,400 


283,999.05 


. 1739& 






Grand total 




2,487,935 


1,223,875 


3,711,810 


1,222,145.16 


. 32926 







68 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Tablk No. 2. — Output of all dredges, with total nnd unit costs — Continued. 



Dredges. 


Month 
worked. 




Auxiliary dredging. 




Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


Cost. 


Unit cost. 


Dipper: 

Paraiso 


9 
7 
10 


33,500 

24,900 

220,800 


54,650 
128,200 
10,000 


88, 150 
153, 100 
230,800 


«37, 653. 54 
51,178.41 
154,049.40 


$0. 42715 


Gamboa 


. 33948 


Cascadas 


. 66746 






Total 




279,200 


192,850 


472,050 


242,881.35 


. 51452 








Ladder: 

Marmot 


7 


134,826 




134,826 


76,204.28 


. 56520 








Total . . 




134,826 




134,826 


76, 204. 28 


. 56520 










Suetiou: 

No. 83 


5i 
10 
9 


500 
217,500 
214,000 




.500 
217,500 
214,000 


1,478.50 
37,462.39 
40,902.03 


2. 95700 


No. 84 


. 17224 


No. 86 




. 19113 






Total .... 




432, 000 




432,000 


79,842.92 


.18482 








Grand total 




846,026 


192,850 


1,038,876 


398,928.55 


.38401 









Dredges. 


1 Months 
' worked. 




Canal prism and auxiliary dredging. 




Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


Cost. 


Unit cost. 


Dipper: 

Paraiso 

Gamboa 


1 9 

7 


463, 285 
229, 500 
487,450 


4.84,075 
462, 450 
424,700 


947, 360 
691,950 
912,150 


$417,875.47 
1351,771.75 
411,:i80.24 


$0. 44109 
.50838 


Cascadas 


... 10 


. 45100 








Total 




1,180,235 


1,371,225 


2,551,460 


1,181,027.46 


.46288 








Ladder: 

Marmot. . 


1 

1 7 


134,826 




134,826 


76,204.28 


. 56520 








Total 


1 


134,826 




134,826 


76,204.28 


. 56520 




1 






Suction: 

No. 83 


10 
9 


423,600 
853, 100 
742, 200 




423,600 
861,600 
779,200 


69, 169. 98 
156,867.84 
137,804.15 


. 16329 


No. 84 

No. 86 


8,500 
37,000 


. 18207 
. 17685 








Total 


1 


2,018,900 


45,500 


2,064,400 


363, 841. 97 


. 17625 








Grand total 




3,333,961 


1,416,725 


4,750,686 


1,621,073.71 


.34123 


< 





Note. — Dredging costs in the above table do not include costs of mining 13,814 cubic yards of rock by 
drill boat Teredo Ao. 2, which amounted to 826,655.86, at the Pacific entrance, as tliis material was not 
haidled by dredges during the fiscal year. 

Dredging costs in the above tab'c include the cost of mining 30,587 cubic yards of rock drilled and blasted 
the previous fiscal year at a cost of $44,881.11, and 33,283 cubic yards of rock mined during the present fiscal 
year at a cost of % '.9,912.69. 

Dredging costs in the above table do not include cost of grsiding, ditching, and sluicing (^faillard Cut, 
which amounted to ?105,970.riG. 

While the preceding tal)le shows the actual cost of the yardage removed, the cost 
of the total yardage handled by dredges wojld be a trifle less, as there were 35,000 
cubic yards of material rehandled for which no credit was taken upon second handling. 

With the exception of dredges Nos. 84, 86, and Marmot, costs are for materials 
placed on the dump. Costs of dredge Marmot are for sand and gravel delivered 
alongside the gravel dock at Gamboa, and of dredges Nos. 84 and 86 for material 
delivered to relay pumps. The pipe lines were 5,200 feet from the dredge to the 
outfall at Balboa and 5,100 feet at Cucaracha slide. 

The following tables show the monthly output of all dredges, exclusive of the sand 
and gravel output, by geographical districts: 



HEPOKX OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



69 



Table No. 3. — Yardage removed from the —4.^-foot. mean sea-level contour in the Atlantic 

Ocean to Gnmboa. 



Montli and year. 


Canal prism. 




Auxiliary. 




Grand 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


Earth. 


Rock. 

I 


Total. 


total. 


1919. 
July 


7,400 




7,400 


4,500 
29,000 
15, 900 

9,000 


2,500 
.52, 150 
79,500 
48,700 : 


7,000 
81, 150 
95,400 
57,700 


14, 400 


Alif^st 




81, 150 










95,400 


October 








57, 700 












Oocember 








■2,900 

1,800 
2,450 


i 


2,900 

1,800 
2,450 


2,900 


1920. 
January 








1 
i 


1,800 












2,450 


March 




















J 1 




Mav 








1 




Jiirio 








7,000 


1 


7,000 


7,000 












Total 


7,400 




7,400 


72, 550 


182,850 } 

i 


255,400 


262, 800 









Table No. 4. — Yardage removed from Gaillard Cut, Gamhoa to Pedro Miguel locks. 



Mouth and vear. 



July 

Ausn^ist 

September. 
October... 
November. 
December . 



1919. 



Canal prism. 



Earth. Rock, i Total. 



8,000 



6,300 I 14,300 
I 



Auxiliary. 

T I 

Earth. Rock. I Total. 



Grand 
total. 



14.300 



.lanuary. . 
February. 

March 

April 

May 

Juiio 



30,000 
71,600 
1.54,335 
119,600 



30,300 
24, 800 
92, 800 
135, 200 
132, 700 
120, 500 



8,125 
67, 250 
63, 500 
54, 000 



42,700 
62. .500 
171^000 
162,700 
295, 200 
268, 600 



38. 125 
138, 850 
217,835 
173, 600 



73,000 I. 

87,300 1. 
263,800 . 
297,900 L 
427,900 !. 
389,100 



1500 



Total. 



919,8.35 1,201,875 2,121,710 



500 



38, 125 
138, 850 
217,835 
173.600 



73, 000 
87,300 
263, 800 
297.900 
427, 900 
389, 600 



500 



2,122,210 



' 390 cubic yards of this amount, salvaged coal from sunken barge No. 226; 200 cubic yards of earth wasted 
on bank of canal. 



Table No. 5. — Yardage removed, Pedro Miguel locks to the ~4o-foot mean sea-level 
contour in the Pacific Ocean. 



Month and year. 



1919. 

July 

Aupist 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



Canal prism. 



Earth. 



144,800 
146, 800 
46, 600 
137, 500 
190,000 
270,000 



116,100 
116,000 

73,900 
120,000 
121,000 

78,000 



1, 560, 700 



Rock. 



4,000 



Total. 



162,800 
146,800 
46,600 
137, .500 
190,000 
270,000 



116,100 
116,000 

73,900 
120,000 
125, 000 

78,000 



1,582,700 



Auxiliary. 



Earth. Rock 



132, 800 

1.39, 200 

56, 700 

6,100 



25,300 



47,100 
92,000 
61,100 
80,000 



12,000 



652,300 



10,000 



Total. 



142,800 
139,200 I 
56,700 ' 
6,100 ' 



10,000 



25,300 



47,100 
92,000 
61,100 
80,000 



12,000 



662,300 



Grand 
total. 



305, 6(K) 
286,000 
103,300 
143,600 
190,000 
295,300 



163, 200 
208, 000 
135,000 
200,000 
125, 000 
90,000 



2,245,000 



70 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



DREDGING CAXAI, PRISM. 



Dredges were at work throughout the year dredging and maintaining the Canal 
channel in Gatun Lake, Gaillard Cut, and the Pacific entrance, excavating a total 
of 3,711,810 cubic yards of construction and maintenance yardage, as shown in the 
following table: 

Table No. 6. — Number of cubic yards removed from the Canal prism. 



Location. 


Construc- 
tion. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


Atlantic entrance 








Gatiin LaVe 




7,400 
2,121,710 


7,400 


Gaillard Cat 




2,121,710 


Mira'lores LaVe 






Pacific entrance 


17,800 


1,564,900 


1 582,700 






Total Canal prism 


17,800 


3,694,010 


3 711 810 







At the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920, there remained to be removed 
from the Canal prism, including siltage, slides, and original material, 2,604,100 cubic 
yards of earth and 682,800 cubic yards of rock. 

The following table shows the classification and location of all yardage remaining 
to be removed from the Canal prism on June 30, 1920: 

Table No. 7. — Yardage remaining to be removed from the Canal prism. 



l-ocaiion- 


Construction. 


Maintenance. 


Grand 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


total. 










825,000 
155,000 
566,000 
175,000 
835,600 




825, 000 
155,000 
1,016,000 
175, 000 
960, 500 


82.5,000 
155. 000 












Gaillard Cut 




25,000 


25,000 


450,000 


1,041,000 




175,000 


Pacific entrance 


47,500 


82.900 


130, 400 


124,900 


1,090,900 






Total 


47,500 


107,900 


155,400 


2,556,600 


574,900 


3,131,500 


3,286,900 



It is estimated that during the present fiscal year ending June 30, 1921, the following 
shoaling vnU occur in the Canal prism: 



Location. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 




200,000 
1,000,000 
1,100,000 




200,000 


Gaillard Cut 


700,000 


1,700,000 




1,100,000 








Total 


2,300,000 


700, 000 


3,000,000 







Work under the project at Miraflores P. I. to widen the channel by cutting off the 
point of land on the west bank just south of Miraflores locks, was continued during 
the year. Forty-nine thousand one hundred culiic yards of earth and rock were 
removed, making the total earth and rock excavated to July 1, 1920, 486,300 cubic 
yards. The total estimated quantities to complete this project are 20,600 cubic yards 
of earth and 124,900 cubic yards of rock. 

The work of widening tlie channel at Paraiso P. I. to give a better and more easy 
approach to the north end of the Pedro Miguel locks, was completed during the year. 
In this work, 93,900 cubic yards of earth and rock were exca\ated, making a total 
of 460,500 cubic yards of earth and rock removed. 

Of the material removed from Gaillard Cut 18 per cent was from (,'ulebra slide, 77 
per cent from Cucaracha slide, 4 per cent from Paraiso P. I. improvement work, and 
1 per cent from miscellaneous dredging. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



71 



The followiug table shows the distribution of all material rcmoAed from Gaillard 
Cut during the year, and also the grand total removed by dredges to June 30, 1920: 

Table No. 8. — Disfrihuiion of materinl reraovexlfrom Gaillard Out. 



Location. 



Fiscal vear. 



Earth. 



Gamboa Di'cc 

Tower •' R " inclinp 

Haut Obispo .slide, west 

Buena Vista slide, west 

Buena Vista slide, east , 

Cascadas slide, east , 

Whitchouse slide, east 

Powderhouse slide, east 

La Pita flower) slide, east 

Empire slide, east 

Division o^flce slide, west 

Lirio slide, west 

Culebra, new slide, east and west ' 
Culebra, old slide, east and west ''. 

Contractor's Hill, north 

65-f(K)t berm, west 

Cuearacha slide, east 

Contractor's Hill slide, west 

Paraiso incline, east 

Paraiso P. 1., west 

Pedro Miguel slide, east 

Miscellaneous ■'' 



Total 919,8:35 1,201,875 



Reck. 



255, 235 



633,600 



20, 800 

'ioJMo' 



120, 575 



995, 200 



73, 100 

'i.3,'66o' 



Total. 



375,810 



1,628,800 



93, 900 
'23,' 200 ' 



Total to date. 



Earth. 



23,856 



Rock. 



HI, 505 
83. 505 



3, 2X5 
5, 470 
2, 300 
2, 525 
9,928 
39, 768 



28, 74.- 



7.290 

, 032, 234 

28,449 

13, 800 



,110,006 
7,900 



73, 700 

i;956 

, 863, 778 



3. 600 

32, 670 

17, 132 

57, 9G2 

53, 803 

212,217 

6,280 

81,780 

22,165,876 

1,061,337 

139, 600 

73, 430 

.5,382,646 

31,600 

20,300 

386, 800 

7,254 

170,860 



2,121,710 7,251,940 30,051,187 37,309,127 



Total. 



88, .361 

S3, 505 

3,235 

5,470 

5, 900 

35, 195 

27, 060 

97, 760 

59,803 

210 962 

6, 280 

80,070 

198,110 

089, 7Sr. 

153, 400 

73. 430 

492, 652 

39. 500 

20;.300 

460; 500 

9,210 

034, 638 



I Since Oct. 14, 1914. 



= Prior to Oct. 14, 1914. 



3 Small slides and fills in the Canal. 



Culebra slides haAe been fairly quiescent during the last fiscal year except during 
the latter part of October, 1919, when East Culebra became active. From October 
16 to December 27, 1919, 272,000 cubic yards were removed from in front of this slide. 
The channel was maintained at all times and no delays to shipping occurred. There 
have been removed from Culebra slides to date 25,287,896 cubic yards of material 
and it is estimated that 750,000 cubic yards more will have to be removed before 
the slides become permanently quiescent. 

Cuearacha slide, extending from the south side of Gold Hill to the north face of 
Purple Rock, reaching from the Canal eastward for 2,500 feet, and coA-ering an area 
of 33 acres, became active on October 3, showing a general movement and shoaling 
within the Canal proper between stations 1805+00 and 1815-fOO. On February 22 
the slide again moved into the Canal and has continued for the last five months. 
The Aodth and depth of the channel in front of this slide varied from time to time over 
this period. At one time the channel was reduced to a depth of 15 feet over a width 
of 60 feet. This closed the Canal to all shipping for fom- days (March 21 to 24, inclusive) . 
A total of 1,628,800 cubic yards of material was removed from this area by dredges 
during the last fiscal year, making a total removed to date 7,492,652 cubic yards. 

At the close of the fiscal year channel conditions at this point were restored almost 
to normal . 

Drag siurveys were made daily in the "vicinity of all active slides, and all lumps or 
ehoals found, which were considered a menace to navigation, were removed by the 
dredges before shipping was allowed to pass. 



All of the spoil from Gaillard Cut and Gatun Lake was disposed of on dumps located 
in Gatun Lake near mile post 24, north of Mamei curve, Avith the exception of 43,850 
cubic yards dumped in the Canal north of Gold Hill, 70,900 cubic yards deposited in 
the Canal by pipe-line dredges south of Cuearacha slide, and 58,200 cubic yards which 
were pumped through a pipe line into the Rio Grande A^alley. There was a total of 
1,991,160 cubic yards of material deposited on the Gamboa dumps during the year. 

The material excavated in the Pacific entrance, including MiratioresP. I. improve 
ment work, was deposited in San Juan fill; on the fiats along the west bank of the 
Canal: on the Arsenal fill: in the Rio Grande east diversion: on the fiats north of the 
Arsenal fill: and in the sea dump located to the westward of the Canal entrance in 
Panama Bay. There were 431,100 cubic yards deposited in San Juan fill, 597,300 



72 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



cubic yards on fiats west of Canal, 207,000 cubic yards on the Arsenal fill, 51,000 
cubic yards on the flats north of the Arsenal fill, 275,000 cubic yards in the Rio Grande 
east diversion, and 21,300 cubic vards in the sea dumps, makinf^ a total deposit of 
1,582,700 cubic yards. 

SUBAQUEOUS KOCK E.XCAVATION. 

Durin» the year 1,233,875 cubic yards of hard and soft rock were removed from the 
Canal prism and T>alboa Harbor, as follows: 120,575 cubic yards from Culebra slides, 
995, 20{) cubic yards from Cucaracha slide, 13,000 cubic yards south of Cucaracha slide, 
73,100 cubic yards from Paraiso P. I. improvement work, 18,000 cubic yards of un- 
mined rock from Miraflores P. I. improvement work, 4,000 cubic yards from the 
Pacific entrance, and 10,000 cubic yards from Balboa Inner Harbor. 

Of these amounts, 33,283 cubic j ards were drilled and blasted by drill boat Teredo 
No. 2 this fiscal year, and 30,587 cubic yards drilled and blasted at the Paraiso P. I. 
last year. There are still 43,770 cubic yards drilled and blasted but not dredged, 
30,029 cubic yards of which are at Miraflores P. I., and 13,741 cubic yards in the 
Pacific entrance; 73 cubic yards of the first amount and all of the latter were drilled 
and blasted by drill boat Teredo ]Vo. 2 this fiscal year. There were 72,045 pounds of 
dynamite used during' the year by the Teredo No. 2 and by dredges in dobying large 
rocks at Paraiso P. I. and Cucaracha slide. 

The following table shows the location, feet drilled, area covered, theoretical break- 
age, and cost of all rock mined by the Teredo No. 2: 





Taulk No. d.'-FerJ 


brinance of drill boat ' 


Teredo No. 2. 


)i 




Month and 
year. 


I/OCatinii. 


Num- 
ber 
holes. 


Total 

feet 

drilled. 


Powder 
(number 
pounds). 


Area 
(square 
yards). 


Break- 
age 
(cubic 
yards). 


Cost. 


Unit 
cost. 


1919. 
.Tuly 


Paraiso, P. I., 19004-10 to 

19014-70 W. 
Paraiso, P. I., 1901+70 to 

1904+10 W. 
Paraiso, P. I., 1904 + 10 to 

1905+70 W. 

Total, Paraiso, 1'. I .. 

Pacific entrance, 2088+50 to 

2101+50 W. 
Pacific entrance, 2297+50 to 

2299+10 E. 
Pacifi c entrance , 2299+10 to 

2300+70 E. 
Pacific entrance, 2290+90 to 

2301+50 W. 

Total, Pacific en- 
trance. 

Cucaracha slide, 1805+00 to 

1809+(X)K. and AV. 
Cucaracha shdc, 180(3+00 to 

1811+00 E. and W. 
Cucaracha slide, 1805+00 to 

1811+00 K. and W. 
Cucaracha slide, station 

1805+00 K. and W. 

Total, Cucaracha 

slide. 
Totals for year 


459 

582 
125 


5,021 
.5,805 
1,431 


14,647 
15,556 
4,210 


16,324 

20, 952 

4,500 


6, 095 
7,738 
1,907 


S9,813.15 
11,353.71 
2,856.25 


$1.4657 


August 

September . . 


1.4673 
1.4978 




1,166 


12,257 


34,413 


41,976 


16,340 


24,023.11 


1.4702 




11 

245 
487 
517 


55 
1,936 
4,783 
3,591 


132 

5,227 

12,644 

9,370 


396 
8,820 
17,532 
18,612 


73 
2,580 
6,375 
4,786 


163.83 
5,790.65 
11,739.74 
8,961.64 


2.2442 


September.. 

October 

November . . 


2.2444 
1.8415 
1.8725 




1,260 


10,365 


27,373 


45,360 


13,814 


26,655.86 


1.9296 


1920. 
March 

April 

May 


■ 24 
35 
19 
11 


380 
541 
260 
145 


1,650 
2, 320 
1,010 

675 


1,170 
1,260 
1,391 
1,000 


690 
7,210 
7,038 
1,405 


3,348.63 
5,053.57 
5,541.92 
1,945.46 


4.8531 
.7009 
.7256 


Juno 


1.3846 




89 


1,326 1 5,655 


4,827 


16,943 


15,889.58 


.93783 




2,515 23,948 


67,441 1 92,163 


47,097 


66,568.55 


1.41343 



MISCELLANEOUS OREDGINCi. 

Atlantic terminals. — During the year 58,400 cubic yards of earth and 182,850 cubic 
yards of rock were removed from the Atlantic terminals as follows: 2,650 cubic yarda 
of earth and 7,850 cubic yards of rock removed from the approach channel extension; 
50,200 cubic yards of earth and 168.000 cubic yards of rock from the extension to the 
west coaling station slip; and 5,550 cubic yards of earth and 7,000 cubic yards of 
rock from the slips north and south of Pier No. 6. 

There have been no dredging operations at Coco Solo during this fiscal year. 

All of this material, a total of 241,250 cubic yards, was dumped between the land 
end of the east breakwater and Margarita Point. 



BBPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 73 

Pacific lenninah. — During the fiecal year 558.700 cubic yards of earth and 10,000 
cubic yards of rock were removed from Balboa Inner Harbor, 53,500 cubic yards of 
earth from in front of Dock No. 6, and 40,100 cubic yards of earth from in front of 
Dock No. 7. 

This material was disposed of as follows: 220,400 cubic yards of earth, excavated 
by a pipe-line dredge unth one relay, through a pipe line 4,750 feet long, were deposited 
on the Diablo dump "A"; 119,000 cubic yards of earth in the San Juan fill; 92,100 
cubic yards of earth on the flats west of the Canal; and 220,800 cubic yards of earth 
and 10,000 cubic yards of rock were towed to sea and deposited on the sea dumji. 

SAND AND (iUAVEI. PRODUCTION. 

The sand and gravel necessary for construction purposes were excavated by the 
French ladder dredge Marmot in the gravel beds of the Chagres River opposite Juan 
Mina, about 5 miles aboA'c Gamboa. There were excavated by this dredge and 
delivered to the Gamboa handling plant 104,749 cubic yards of run-of-bank gravel 
and 15,927 cubic yards of washed sand. There were also 13,100 cubic yards of mud 
removed to uncover the gravel beds and 1,050 cubic yards of mud removed in front 
of Gamboa gravel dock. This total of 14,150 cubic yards of mud was dumped in deep 
water in the Chagres River. The following amounts of sand and gravel were on hand 
in stock at Gamboa July 1, 1920: 1,449 cubic yards of sand, 25,038 cubic yards of 
No. 1 gravel, 4, 296 cul)ic yards of No. 2 gravel, and 51,899 cubic yards of run-of-bank 
gravel. There were shipped during the year 39,261 cubic yards of sand, 57,093 cubic 
yards run-of-bank gravel. 34,992 cubic yards No. 2 gravel, making a total of 131,346 
cubic yards. 

DRAINAGK. 

Ditches were excavated at West (3ulebra and Barge Repair slides, ICast and West 
Lirio, and Cucaracha by the hydraulic graders to prevent water from standing in the 
areas. 

SLIDE INSPECTION .\ND RKPORTS. 

Inspections were made of all slide areas from time to time, new l)reaks reported, 
and drainage conditions noted. 

MINDI DIKES AND GROINS. 

The rock and timber dikes and groins along Mindi Beach, south of Limon Bay, 
were maintained throughout the fiscal year. No new dikes or groins have been con- 
Btructed, and only minor repairs have been necessary to those pre\dously built. 

WATER HYACINTHS. 

Regular monthly inspections were made of the waters of the Canal, Gatun Lake, 
and tributaries. All the scattering hyacinths were pulled, but most of those in beds 
were destroyed by spraying with a solution of arsenic and soda. 

During the year 2,500,000 plants of the floating variety were pulled and deposited 
on shore and 403,500 square yards of hyacinths were destroyed by spraj-dng with the 
arsenic solution. Log booms placed in the upper reaches of the Pescado River, to 
keep the channel na\Tgable for small boats, Avere maintained. Log booms were also 
placed and maintained at the mouths of the Mandiugo and Chagres Rivers to keep the 
hyacinths from being washed into the Canal by freshets. 

The floating variety has made its appearance in Canal Zone waters for the first time 
during this fi.scal year. This is a much harder variety than the anchored kind to 
control. 

SURVEYS. 

The usual progress surveys were made of the dredged areas in the Canal prism, 
Cristobal Harbor, Gatun Lake, Gaillard Cut, and Balboa Inner Harbor. The Gatun 
Lake, Margarita, and Pacific sea dumps were surveyed and charted. Two topographi- 
cal surveys of Cuaaracha slide area were made and plotted. Borings were made of the 
proposed area for a feiTy landing at Mindi, and rock exploration surveys were made 
in front of the reloader wharf and along the west prism line, between stations 2286-fOO 
and 2307+00, at Balboa. All surveys, estimates, and plans of all dredging and mining 
projects proposed during the year were prepared. Dump inspection in Gatun Lake 
section and at the Pacific and Atlantic entrances was maintained during dredging 
operations in those localities. 

OFFICE. 

All clerical work, preparation of progress records, estimates, requisitions, etc., were 
satisfactorily performed during the year. 



74 the panama canal. 

Electrical Division. 

Tlio details of the o])erations of the eleotri'-al divisiou during the 
fiscal year aro covorod in the report of the electrical engineer, which 
follows : 

Electrical Division. 

W. Jj. Hersh, Electrical Enpneer. 

ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL. 

The personnel, as recorded in last year's report, was coutimied throughout the 
year, with the exception that Mr. Carl W. Markham, who returned from military 
service, was reinstated in his former position of electriral recorder effective Novem- 
ber 1, 1919, and ^fr. M. P. Benninger was assigned to other duty. The six sub-divi- 
sions into whicli the work of this division is divided are listed as follows: 

Power and transmission system, B. R Grier, superintendent. 

Construction and maintenance, A. C. Garlington, superintendent. 

Telephones and telegraphs, C. L. Bleakley, supervisor. 

Railway signal system, E. C. McDonald, supervisor. 

Designing and estimating, W. T. O'Connell, e.?timator and designer. 

Office and requisitions, C. W. Markham, electrical recorder. 

In this division there were 248 gold and 288 silver employees at work during the 
last week of June, 1920. The average monthly pay roll was $65,300. 

CHARACTER AND EXTENT OF WORK. 

The duties of the electrical division remained unchanged during the year with 
the exception in the case of maintaining and charging of storage battery cargo handling 
trucks at the Cristolml terminal docks, whifh activity was taken over March 15, 1920, 
by the receiving and forwarding agent of the Panama Railroad. The principal func- 
tions comprising the acti\dtie3 of the electrical division are the operating and main- 
taining the steam and hydroelectric power plants, substations, transmission lines, 
and power-distribution systems; the maintenance of street, shop, dock, public 
building, and residence lighting systems; the maintenance of telephone, telegraph, 
fire alarm, and railway signal systems and railway interlocking plants, charging and 
maintaining of storage battery cargo handling trucks at the Pacific terminal docks 
and warehouses; and the installation and maintenance of such electrical equipment 
as required by other divi.-^ions of the Canal or other departments of the Government, 
and by such commercial vessels as might require this class of work while transiting 
the Canal. 

The handling of the foregoing work required the issuing of a total of 4,785 work 
orders, mth the attendant reports, estimates, and miscellaneous correspondence. 
There was prepared a total of 25 requisitions for material, which included specifications 
for 2,113 items, and totaling in estim.ated value $824,352. 

The total expenditure of the division for the year was approximately $1,700,000, 
of which 1^ per cent was for work performed for other departments of the Govern- 
ment, 6 per cent was for exterior electrical work at Fort Clayton and Fort Davis, 
9 per cent was for improvements to the power system, 10 per cent was for work per- 
formed for outside interests, 24 per cent was for work and power for the Panama Rail- 
road, 46 per cent was for work and current for other departments of the Canal, and the 
balance of about S^ per cent covered stock of materials, some equipment purchases, 
and work in progress awaiting completion and rendering of billing. 

The work of checking and mapping of duct lines and of preparing feeder-connection 
diagrams of the underground distribution system, as mentioned in last year's report, 
was continued when other activities permitted and was advanced to a state of about 
60 per cent completion by the end of June. 

POWER-SYSTEM EQUIPMENT AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

The installations of major equipment of the power system as existing at the end of 
last year remained unchanged throughout the year. Any improvements or changes 
which have been undertaken have been of a secondary nature and are briefly sum- 
marized as follows: 

At the C>atun hydro-electric station a small amount of preliminary work was ac- 
complished in i^reparation tor the installation of Unit No. 5. Part of the switchboard 
and oil s\\dtch equipment pertaining to this unit arrived during the later months of 
the year, but the actual work of installation has not been started. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 75 

The unit pruper, consisting of generator, turlnne, and governor, was originally placed 
on a ])roprietary requisition from the respective manufacturers of Unit No. J. How- 
ever, on account of the high price quoted by the contractor for the turbine and 
governor, it was decided to cancel the original requisition covering the unit proper, 
and to prepare new specifications in order that same might be put out on a competi- 
tive bid Imsis. This required a complete set of detail drawings of the turbine and 
governor, which are well under way at the present time, and upon the completion of 
which the new renuisition will be placed. 

About the middle of February the 2,200-6,600 volt autotransformer of Unit No. 
2 at the Gatun hydroelectric station failed in service, due to burn-out between turns 
of the winding. Several coils were replaced, and transformer was returned to service, 
only to fail again in other coils during the early part of May, making it necessary to 
place cablegram requisition for a complete tet of new coils for this autotransformer. 
Awaiting the delivery of thefe new coils, No. 2 generator has been placed in 2,2C0-yo!t 
service, under which conditions it can be operated at about three-quarter capacity. 

During the dry sea?on, when IMiraflores steam station was placed in service, it was 
found convenient to clean and paint head sates, traih racks, and valve guides at the 
hydroelectric station. An inspection of the bitumastic enameling on the inside of 
penstocks made at the same time showed that this enamel was in very good condition. 

At the Miraflores steam electric station a 3-inch oil-pipe line was installed in such 
a manner as to pa-s through the ash pits for the purpose of heating the heavy grade 
of fuel oil now being used. 

At each of the Gatun, Cristobal, Miraflores, and Balboa substations the work of 
remodeling storage-battery rooms was completed. New batteries were installed at 
Gatun, Cristobal, and Balboa, but at Miraflores the battery was completely over- 
hauled by using the better cell materials from the other stations. 

At the'Cristobal substation two 2,200-volt feeder equipments were installed, using 
materials recovered from the hydroelectric station. One of these feeder eqiiiprrents 
is to be used for a distribution feeder to the new silver townsite at Mount Hope, 
which is under construction. The second equiprrent will be used for a feeder to 
relieve the existing feeders to the Cristobal docks, whit h would otherwise become over- 
loaded when the new machine shop at the docks will be finished and placed in service. 

At Gatun substation additions to equipment consisted of the installation of a 300 
KVA 60,000-volt testing transformer for applying high potential tests to the trans- 
mission line, and the replacement of the 16-ton manually operated chain hoist by a 
80-ton motor-operated chain hoist, this c hange being preparatory to the handling and 
installing of an 8,400 KVA 44,000-6, 600-volt water-cooled transformer now on 
requidtion for this substation. 

At Balboa and Cristobal substations the originally installed 800-ampere bus tie 
switches were replaced by switches of 1,000-ampere capacity, which were recovered 
from the hydroelectric station. Also at the Balboa substation there were installed 
two 2,200-volt feeder equipments for future needs, using materials recovered from the 
hydroelectric station. 

During the dry season an endeavor was made to anticipate the deterioration of por- 
celain insulators in service on transmission line, and as a result of these tests a total 
of 1,915 insulator disks were marked for removal. By the end of June 902 of these 
insulators had been replaced. During the dry season all transmission line steel 
towers and also the strain fixtures on all substation roofs were given a complete coat 
of gray paint. 

OPERATION OF POWER SYSTEM. ^ 

The power system was operated throughout the year with an average combined 
generator output of 5,382,750 kilowatt hours a month, as compared with an average 
combined generator output of 4,725,637 kilowatt hours a month last year. There was 
an average of 4,608,341 kilowatt hours a month transmitted and distributed to all 
power consumers this year as compared with a corresponding average of 3,955,607 
kilowatt hours a month last year. From the above there results a power system 
transmission and distribution loss of 14.4 per cent this year, as compared with a cor- 
responding loss of 16.3 per cent last year. 

During the dry season months of March, April, and May it was found adidsable 
to conserve the water stored in Gatun Lake, and for this reason the hydroelectric 
station at Gatun was relieved of a load ranging from 3,000 to 4,000 kilowatts. For 
the three-month period this load was carried by the steam-power i^lant at Miraflores, 
during which period this plant generated 8,234,380 kilowatt hours, and consumed 
47,040.14 barrels (42-gallon) of fuel oil. During the remaining nine months_ of the 
year the steam plant was maintained on the basis of stand-by service, for \vhich the 
average rate of fuel consumption was 2,311 barrels a month, as compared with a cor- 
responding rate of 2,515 barrels a month last year. 



76 



THE PANAMA CANAL.. 



On the transmission line there were a total of 11 interruptione in Kervice from all 
causes, as compared with a corresponding total of 49 last year. Of this total, 1 inter- 
ruption was chargeable to insulator failure, as compared with 32 last year. This 
improvement in service is attributable to the fact that an additional insulator disk 
was added to all insulator strings and to the testing and weeding out of 1,475 insulator 
disks, as mentioned in report for last year. 

The average cost of distributed power for the year was 9.421 mills a kilowatt hour, 
as compared with a corresponding cost of 8.097 mills last year. The a\'erage cost of 
distributed ligliting current, including lamp renewals, was 13.277 mills a kilowatt 
hour this year, as compared with a corresponding cost of 12.963 mills last year. These 
increases in the unit costs of power and lighting current have been caused largely by 
the revision of the reserve for depreciation account and the fact that the Mirafiores 
steam station was pressed into service during three months of the dry season. 

The following tabulation shows, by months, the combined generator output at the 
Gatu'i and Miraiore? generating stations; also the power distributed to all consumers 
and the percentage of power lost between generators and the consumers: 



Month. 



July 

Au?a;t 

September . 

October 

N'o .-ember . 
December. . 



1919. 



January... 
February . 

March 

-Vpril 

May 

June 



1920. 



Average this year. 
.Vverage last year. 



Combined generator 
output . 



Gatun 
hydro 
station. 



Kilowatt 
hours. 
5, 228, 000 
5,422,000 
5,125,000 
5,322,000 
5,128,000 
5,667,700 

5,894,400 
5,221,000 
2, 504, 200 
2, 132, 5'M 
3,027,400 
5,477,400 



Miraflores 
steam 
station. 



Kilowatt 
hours. 



2, 928, 590 

3,005,350 

2,300,440 

208, 120 



Total 

distributed 

power. 



Kilowatt 
hours. 
4,417,078 
4,584,693 
4,345,679 
4,549,394 
4,365,968 
4, 829, 153 

5,006,940 
4,502,010 
4,752,618 
4, 507, 733 
4,685,090 
4, 753, 138 



4,608,341 
3,955,607 



System 
losses, 
including 
excitation, 
auxiliaries, 
transmis- 
sion, and 
transforma- 
tion. 



Per cent. 
15.6 
15 5 
15 2 
11.5 
14.75 
14.75 

15.1 
13.7 
12.5 
12.1 
12.1 
16.4 



14.4 
16.3 



The following tabulation shows the cost of operation and maintenance of the power 
system and the unit costs of power in its various stages of distribution. The unit 
costs are based on the net quantities of power delivered to consumers and not on the 
gross amounts generated. 



Xet power consumption (kwh) 

Costs of operation and maintenance: 

Oatun hydro3lectrie station 

Miraflores steam-electric station 

Tran-iformer substations 

irightension transmission lines 

Distribution lines 

Depreciation, po.ver system 

Heservc for repairs...." 

Total costs distributed power | 520,077.29 

Net consumption lighting current (kwh) 

Cost, maintenance, lighting system, including lamp renewals. . 
<-03t of lighting current per kilo.vatt hour 



Totals, 

fiscal year 

1920. 



55,300,094 



Average cost per 
kilowatt hour. 



This year. Last year 



$48,771.71 
142, 100. 61 
82, 146. 13 
16,797.25 
31, 161., 59 
19.'J,000.00 
5,000.00 



IJ, 9oi6, S7S 
$53,939.83 



$0.0008819 
. 0025696 
. 00148.54 
. 000;{037 
. 0005634 
. 0035262 
. 0000904 



. 0094206 



$0. 0038,564 
.013277 



SO. 001053 
.002381 
.001597 
. 000528 
. 000502 
. 002022 
. 000000 



008083 



$0.004880 
.012063 



GATUN SPILLWAY. 



The operation and maintenance of the Gatun spillway was performed by the forces 
of the electrical division throughout the year. There were no failures of equipment 
and no operating difficulties were experienced. There was a total of 153 gate oper- 
ations, 126 of which were for regulation of lake level and the remaining 27 were for 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



77 



inspection and miscellaneous reasons. During the dry season all railings about the 
spillway were cleaned and painted, and all structural steel and other metal parts 
were painted where necessary. The building division installed steel apron plates 
on four baffle piers during the dry season. 

TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH SYSTEMS. 

The electrical division continued to operate and to maintain the telephone system 
and to maintain the telegraph system of the Panama Railroad Company throughout 
the year. 

Diu-ing the year 999 telephones were installed, and 636 telephones were removed, 
leaving a total of 3,330 telephones in service at the end of June, 1920, representing an 
increase of 363 telephone installations for the year. 

The average number of telephone calls during the eight-hour business day, as 
determined by peg count, was about 28,900 calls, representing a rate of 3,600 telephone 
calls an hour, as compared v\ith corresponding figures of 22,630 calls a day and a rate 
of 2,829 telephone calls an hour last year. 

During the year 15,114 feet of lead-covered paper-insulated telephone cable of 
all sizes, A'arjing from 5 to 200 pair, were installed, resulting in a total installation of 
642,448 feet of cable in service at the end of June, 1920. On this entire cable installa- 
tion there occurred 13 cases of cable trouble as compared with 12 cases of trouble 
last year. 

The following outline of telephone statistics has been compiled in a condensed form 
to show the growth of telephone equipment and installations during the past year 
as compared with previous years. 

Canal Zone telephone system. 



Miles of pole line 

Miles of imderground eouduit: 

Panama Railroad 

Panama Canal, occupied by Panama Railroad. 

Total miles of conduit 

Miles of cable: 

In duct 

Aerial 



Totalmiles of cable. 



Miles of wire: 

In duct 

In submarine cable 

In aerial cable 

Bare and insulated, aerial lines. 



Total 

Miles of wire: 

Trunk circuits 

Subscribers' circuits. 
Telegraph circuits. . . 



June 30, 
1916. 



Total. 



Miles of phantom circuits. 
.Miles of .simplex circuits. . 



Total. 



Telephone exchanges: 
Panama Railroad. 

Panama Canal 

Army and Navy.. 



Total. 



Telephones: 

Panama Railroad. 

Panama Canal 

.\rmy and Na\'y.. 



Total telephones. 



June 30, 
1917. 



212 
10 



8,2S2 

26 

470 

522 



9,300 



2,002 

7,048 

250 



9,300 



576 



672 



1,87S 
104 
400 



2,382 



Kxchange connections daily ' '■' 12, 165 

Trunk connections daily ' .' I 2, 954 



43 



212 
20 



232 



June 30, 

1918. 



212 
26 



238 



June 30, 
1919. 



212 
34 



June 30, 
1920. 



246 



101 
2 



111 

2 



118 
2 



113 



9,989 
55 
124 

508 



11,457 
55 
124 
.515 



10,676 12,151 



11,856 

55 

124 

526 



12, 531 



2,810 

7,561 

305 



4,040 

7,753 

358 



4,259 

7,898 I 
404 i 



12,561 



576 



576 
96 



672 
132 



672 



2,154 
110 

578 



2,842 



17,801 
3,241 



Total I 15, 119 21, 042 



22 



2, .523 
114 
670 



3,307 



3, 784 



21,816 
3,924 



21,415 
6,396 



25, 740 



1 Exchange and trunk connections are those handled in the four main exchanges only. 



38 



212 

36 



248 



120 
2 



122 



12, 960 

55 

124 

550 



13, 689 



4,588 

8,605 

496 



13,689 



768 
132 



22 



2,967 ' 3,330 

114 120 

703 707 



4,157 



22, 503 
7,241 



27,811 29,744 



78 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



FIRE-ALARM SYSTEM. 

The work of inspectina; and maintaining the fire-alarm system has been continued 
under the suporxdsion of the telephone subdi\'ision. Two new fire-alarm boxes were 
installed on pier No. (J at Cristobal, and two existinti; fire-alarm boxes were relocated 
at Blount Hope. 01 ;l fire-alarm box su])ports were replaced by standard iron posts 
at two locations in Cristobal and at two locations in Balboa. 

At the Balboa fire station a new loop-distributing board was installed and the ter- 
minal vv'iviufr was rearranged. In the Balboa district it was necessary to reroute about 
3,000 feet of two-conductor fire-alarm cable. 

There were 27 alarms turned in, and no failure of any alarm apparatus occurred 
during the year. 

RAILWAY-SIGNAL SYSTEM. 

There weie practically no changes made in the installation of railway signals during 
the year. Considerable maintenance work was found necessary in reinsulating splices 
in underground si.>nal cables. 

There were 2,2f)2,937 registered arm movements with 149 responsil^le signal failures 
compared to 2.081,908 arm movements and 97 responsible signal failures last year, 
and 2,404,170 arm movements and 131 responsible failures for the year ended June 
30, 1918. There was an average of 15,187.5 arm movements per responsible signal 
failure compared to 21,495 last year, and 18,352 for the year endt,d June 30, 1918. 
Counting only avoidable signal failures there were 44,371 arm movements per sirnal 
failure. There were 547 train minutes delay this year compared to 181 minutes last 
year, and 556 minutes for the year ende'i June 30, 1918. There was an average delay 
of 4 minutes per train for each signal failure. 

There was one reported false clear aspect and one false caution aspect during the 
year on the entire signal system. The false clear aspect occurred .September 12, 1919, 
on signal No. 239, due to sweating relay box and possibly leaky door on relay box. 
The false caution aspect occurred in December, 1919, and was caused by a broken 
slot tojfgle which was discovered by a signal maintainor who was at the signal when 
it occurred. 

The responsible and nonresponsible signal failures, arm movements, and train 
minutes delay for each month during the year are outlined in the following tabulation: 





Month. 


Signal failures. 


Total arm 
movements. 






Responsible. 


Nonre- 
sponsible. 


Delay train 
minutes. 




Avoidable. 


Unavoid- 
able. 




July 


1919. 


10 
1 
2 
2 
3 
.') 

7 
1 
2 
10 
6 
2 


7 


2 
1 
1 
4 

1 
5 


194,990 
197,483 
180,014 
183,316 
171,716 
180,300 

206,248 
223, 863 
184,209 
195, 039 
178,921 
166,838 


13 




10 




4 
9 
2 
15 

6 
16 
22 

8 
2 

7 


28 


October 


23 


November 


5 




115 




1920. 


25 






85 


M irch 




122 


A oril 


1 


.55 


Miv 


40 






26 










Total... 


51 


98 


15 


2,262,937 


547 



There was an average of 45.5 train minutes delay and 12.5 responsible signal failureJ 
per month. 

In the following is tabulated an analysis of the responsible signal failures for each 
month of the year. 



KEPOKT OF KXGlXKKll OF MAINTENANCE. 



79 



Responsible sic/nal interruptions for fiscal year ending June 30, 1920. 





>* 

:? 


3 
< 



2 
ft 


o 
o 
O 


i 
1 

o 


i 

Q 


a 

a 


1 


i 


d 

P. 

< 




t-5 


i 

1 


a 

(O 



u 


Loose nut between track wire ter- 


j 








1 
1 














1 

1 
6 

3 

3 
10 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
1 
2 

4 
8 
18 
2 
2 
9 

4 

2 
1 

1 
3 
2 

5 
40 


0.7 


Track relay disconnected account 




















.7 




1 














3 


4.0 


Voor or defective track ])at. dirty 


1 


1 










1 


1 


2.0 




........ 


2 














1.3 


Loose connection onload-out wire of 










3 










2.0 


High-resistance contacts on track relay' 


1 






10 








7.6 


1 


1 


\ 


2 






1 


"2 


2.5 






1 


,' 









1.3 






1 




1 1 


2 










1.3 


Broken factory splice in track i 


.... 


■■■f" 


'..'.'.\...X.'.'.'. 

1 1 


' 










1.3 


2 












1.3 


Open lead on track relay coils i 


2 




::':i:.:j::':i.. ..!.... 


1 








2.0 




1 


1 












.7 


Switch box out of adjuslniont ' 

Discharged or exhauoted storage bat- 


2 

1 


1 


....l.... 














1.3 


1 




3 
















2.5 






} 










1 


5 


1 

3 

2 




5.2 




4 




1 


4 


1 




12.0 


.i . . 


[ 






1.3 




1 


1 












1.3 


Open wire from sisaial to main cable. . 

Commutalor stic' iiig on signal motor, 

account of (.iirty bruslie-, etc 


1 
2 




1 


4 

1 






3 

1 










6.0 
















2.5 




















2.5 


Open circuit, broken jumper wire on 






i 








2 


1 


1.3 








1 










1 

1 


.7 








i 








.7 


Open coil on 1,003-ohm repeater relay. 
Exhausted primary battery, careless 


2 
2 






) 1 




' 








2.0 






■;:: ....i.... 




1 




1.3 


1 


.... 


1 
1 






3 

1 










3.3 






?. 


14 


10 


7 


i I 1 I 2 


27.4 




17 








Total 


1 


G 


11 5 


20 


13 


17 


24 


18 8 


9 


149 


100 















1 Track circuit defects responsible for 30 per cent of signal failures. 

There were two derailments at the interlocking plants during the year. One 
occurred at Dial^lo and the other at the pontoon bridge at Paraiso. There were also 
two derailments at hand-throw pipe-connected derails, one at Mount Hope passing 
track and one at Tower R, Gamboa. 

There were 34 reported sigral failures for the year from various causes at the inter- 
locking plants compared to 3() lor last year. Of these, 24, or about 70 per cent, occurred 
at the pontoon biidge. Considerable delays were also reported during the month of 
January, 1920, in closing the bridge on account of rail wedges not droi)ping into place. 
This was caused by the bridge bumping the abutments when opening and closing, 
thereby throwing the apron girder about 3 to 4 inches out of alignment at the extreme 
end. \ 

Due to the increased costs of labor and material, the cost of maintaining railway 
signals lias increased about 20 per cent over last year. 

MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRICAL WORK. 

The principal items of electrical work not otherwise classified or mentioned include 
the following items: 

The addition of 40 lighting standards to the street-lighting systems in Canal Zone 
towns; the construction of underground distribution and street-lighting systems and 
the illumination of Iniildings at Fort Clayton and at Fort Davis; the starling of con- 
struction work for the distribulion of lighting cunent to the new silver townsite at 
Mount Hope; the completion of underground distribution and the equipping of a 
small motor-driven pumping station at l-rante Field: tlie extension of auxiliary power 
circuits for the division of fortification; tlie installation of a 24-panel switchboard and 



80 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

seven motor geueratois and the necessary accessory equipment in the Coco Solo sub- 
station; the construction of duct line across reclaimed area at New Cristobal and the 
extension of an existing feeder cable to this area; tlie installation of a supplementary 
feeder in Balboa to relieve overloaded feeder cables: the complete rewiring, includ- 
ing the rewinding of all motors for the reconstructed sand and gravel handling cranes 
at Gamboa; the installation of switchboard, transformers, and motor equipment for 
the rerolling mill at Balboa; the construction of about a mile of four-cell duct line 
tlirough Balboa; the placing of 7,200 feet of submarine cable for the beacon-light 
circuits of the lighthouse subdivision; the installation of water heaters in practically 
all bachelor quarters in Balboa, A neon, Pedro Miguel, Gatun, and Cristobal for the 
supply department; the completion of the underground distribution system and the 
installation of motor-generator and switchboard equipment in machine shop at the 
naval air station. 

The work at tlie electrical repair shop, exclusive of tlie work done in the field or 
which required men to leave the shop; may be briefly summarized as including the 
following: 

Armatures, motors, and generators rewound 307 

Transformers and miscellaneous coils rewound 131 

M agnetos and fan motors rewound or repaired 156 

Miscellaneous electrical ai^pliances repaired G2 

Switchboard and panels manufactured 148 

Miscellaneous other rej^air jobs 180 

The force of the electrical division handled 361 jobs of marine electric work at 
Cristobal and 416 jobs of the same class at Balboa ; the more imjiortant items of this 
class of work include the complete rewiring or overhauling of and making additions 
to the electrical installations aboard the steamships Cristobal. Acajutla, Ansaldo San 
Gioniio, Salarerry, Paita. Cirmsnian Prince, Azov, Ardmore, and tlie Peruvian cruiser 
Lima. 

MuxTCiPAL Engineering Division. 

The details of the operations of tiie municipal engineering tlivisioii 
(luring the fiscal year are covered in the report of the municipal 
engineer, which follows : 

Municipal Engineering Division. 

D. E. Wright, Municipal Engineer. 

The municipal division performed the necessary surveys for new townsite projects, 
the layout and design for water, sewers, storm drainage,. streets, sidewalks, and land- 
scape work for same; the maintenance and operation of all roads, water-pumping 
stations, purification plants, pipe lines, and such building construction work as 
directly concerned this division. The principal items of new construction were the 
new Army post at Fort Clayton, located at Miraflores, and Fort Davis, located at 
Gatun; the extension of Colon, comprising the area between G and K Streets and 
between Seventh and Ninth Streets, an area giving 99 building lots for residential 
purposes for private individuals; also an area in this vicinity lying between G and 
K Streets and Second and Seventh Streets as a proposed addition for residential 
purposes for Canal employees. The development of the area between Fourteenth 
Street and Folks RiAer for Panama Railroad staljles, and the area between E and G 
Streets and Fourteenth and Fiiteenth Streets for warehouse purposes; development 
for the area for construction of 33 houses for silver employees of the Panama Railroad 
on the docks and at the coal-handling plant — this involved grading, the installation 
of water and sewer lines, streets and sidewalks; the area developed was between 
Mount Hope and Colon, and dengnated as "Silver City"; construction of the concrete 
road with asphalt wearing surface for the lumber shed in Balboa to Diablo; the re- 
surfacing and oiling of the Paraiso-Gamboa macadam road; the necessary street 
extension for new buildings at Fort Sherman, with the necessary water and sewer 
connections; the laying out and making the fill necessary for and grading the baseball 
park at Coco Solo: the laying of various stretches of concrete sidewalks and water 
connections for this point; the liuilding of tennis courts at France Field, Gatun, and 
the resurfacing of tennis courts in Ancon; the construction of various sized storm 
sewers in the vicinity of Panama to relieve the combined sewer system originally 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



81 



installed at this point, sewers ranging in size from 2h by 2t to 6 by (>; the demolition 
of the Caledonia bridge over the Panama Railroad tracks, and the putting in of a 
grade crossing. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The municipal division is divided into three sections, viz: The Southern district, 
including all points in the Canal Zone from Darien south and including the city of 
Panama; the Northern district, comprising all points in the Canal Zone from Darien 
north, including the city of Colon; and the operation of pmification plants, testing 
laboratories, and reservoirs. 

PER.SONNEL. 

Mr. R. C. Hardman transferred on October 15, 1919, as superintendent of the 
Southern district and was succeeded by Mr. George W. Green on October 16, 1919. 

Mr. E. H. Chandler was relieved as superintendent of the Northern district on March 
10, 1920, and was succeeded by Mr. A. C. Miller on March 11, 1920. 

Mr. George C. Runker, physiologist, continued in charge of the purification plants 
and laboratories. 

Mr. A. G. Nolte was appointed assistant physiologist, effective February 21, 1920. 

SOUTHERN DISTRICT. 

In the Southern district all pumping stations, water and sewer lines, streets, side- 
walks and roads, and the upkeep of equipment were performed, as well as various 
items of new construction pertaining directly to appropriations made this division, 
besides the performance of such construction work as was requested from other divi- 
sions of The Panama Canal, the United States Army, the United States Navy, private 
companies and individuals, and by the Panaman Government. The report of 
operations of pumping stations is given in the following statement: 



Pumping station. 



Total 
gallons 
pumped 
during 

year. 



Gamhoa, U. S. No. 1 3,895,630,000 

Miraflores, U. S. No. 2 ' 423,790,000 

Balloa, U. S. No. 3 : 2,790,202,000 

Paraiso ' 74,640,000 

Cucaracha (Mount Zion) ' 176,513,000 



Average 
number 
ga Ions 

per 
month. 



324,636,000 
35,315,833 

232,516,841 
6,220,000 
14,709,445 



Average 

cost per 

thousand 

gallons for 

pumping. 



$0. 0154 
.0162 
.0141 
.0447 



In the city of Panama the usual maintenance work was performed by the municipal 
division on the water and sewer systems and pavements, the work of maintenance and 
operation in the city, including the installation of water meters on new construction, 
the rei)airs and maintenance of all work installed on pre^-ious construction, and the 
preparation and collection of water-rent bills for water consumed. The following 
table shows the q\iantity of water used in Panama during the fiscal year, by quarters, 
together with amount of water rentals: 

Consu'inption per quarter. 



Quarter ended— 



Sept. 30, 1919. 
Dec. 31, 1919.. 
Mar. 31, 1920.. 
Jime30, 1920.. 



Total for year. 



Paying 
connec- 
tions. 



2,434 
2,433 
2,445 
2,457 



Private. 



Gallons. 
155,147,000 
119,873,000 
176,786,000 
166, 962, 000 



Public hy- 
drant and 
taps. 



Oallnnx. 
101, 421. (XX) 
101, 862; 000 
,82,501,000 
91,8,88,000 



648,768,000 377,672,000 1,026,440,000 2,850,750 



Total. 



Gallons. 
256, 56S, 000 
251,735,000 
259, 2S7, 000 
258, 850, 000 



Daily aver- 
age con- 
sumption. 



GaUnn<i. 
2,850,000 
2, 797. 000 
2, f^O, 000 
2,876,000 



8847—20 fi 



82 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Collections. 



Quarter ended- 



Sept. 30, 1919 

Dec. 31, 1919 

Mar. 31. 1920 

June 30, 1920 2 

Total for year 



Amount 
collected 
from pri- 
vate con- 
simiers.i 



840,698.60 
39, 343. 10 
46,250.80 
43,622.00 



169,920.50 



Average 
consump- 
tion per pri- 
vate con- 
nection per 
quarter. 



Gallons. 
63,741 
61,189 
72, 305 
67,953 



265, 188 



Average 

private 

quarterly 

bill. ■ 



«16. 72 
16.17 
18.92 
17.75 



69.56 



> Includes all bills rendered against Panaman Government for water consumed in public buildings in 
Panama City. 
' Net amoimt of hills due (not yet collected). 

In addition to the regular maintenance and operation in Panama City, consisting 
in main of the following: Hydrants inspected and tlrshed. 2.544; repaired, 510; leaks 
repaired in service connection, 35; concrete paAcment rei)laced or repaired, 173 
square yards; brick pavement repaired, 341 square yards; mc^ters repaired and reset, 
597; meters set on new contracts, 16; stoppages cleared in sewer main, 47; manholes 
cleaned and Hushed. 18,514; concrete ]>avements repaired and relaid, 5,828 square 
yards; concrete drains constructed, 488 linear feet; catch basins built. 5; server pipe 
for new connections laid, 231 linear feet; bricks reclaimed and cleaned, 7,450. 

Under the appropriation of $200,000 for sewer extensions aud storm-sewer construc- 
tion, the following work was ])erformed: 350 feet 8-inch vitrified pipe laid between 
Northern Avenue and Eleventh Street; 260 linear feet of 2h by 2^ concrete box sewer 
constructed on Northern Avenue to Thirteenth Street; 1.220 linear feet of 32- by 3^ 
concrete box sewer from Thirteenth Street through JaAdllo fill to Northern Avenue; 100 
linear feet of 4 by 5 concrete box sewer cross-connecting existing sewer on Northern 
Avenue; 880 linear feet of 4 by 4 concrete box sewer from Northern Avenue through 
Panama Railroad yard to Third of November and Nineteenth Streets; 750 linear feet 
of 5 by 5 concrete box sewer from Third of November Street down Ninth Street to 
Twelfth of October Street; 350 linear feet of 15-inch concrete pipe on Twelfth of Octo- 
ber Street, from East Nineteenth Street to the beach; 1,330 linear feet of 3 by 3 con- 
crete box sewer paralleling Third of November Street from East Nineteenth Street 
and crossing the Panama Railroad at Caledonia grade crossing, thence to the inter- 
section of Central Avenue and L Street. The following amount of work was necessary 
for the above-mentioned construction Avork: 

Excavation cubic yards. . 10, 373 

Backfill !do. . . . 8, 890 

Grading .stjaare yards. . 3, 000 

Concrete sidewalk rebuilt do 292 

Reinforcing steel placed — -.^-inch, |-inch, and |-incli. linear feet. . 30, 000 

Concrete placed cubic yards. . 1, 680 

the above at a total cost of $11 2, 177.84. 

The engin(H'ring forces performed the necessary work of ])reparing plans, estimates, 
and layout for the proposed new Santo Tomas Hos])ital on a special work reciuest from 
the Panaman (io^'ernment, besides performing various miscellaneous jobs in connec- 
tion with the starting of this work by forces of the Panaman Government. A work 
request was also ])laced u])on this division for the construction of the concrete streets 
in the hospital layout and on the 1st of July a total of 7,532 square yards of concrete 
pavement had beisn laid. 

Individu-vus .\nd Companies. 

The Central and tiouth Ameriam Cable Company. — Work recpiests were issued by 
this company to the amount of .$5,615.32, covering water and sewer connections for 
their liuildings, grading, and grass planting in the vicinity of same and the necessary 
patrolling of water and sewer lines 8U]jplying their reservation. 

The Pawnna Electric Comjxmij. ^Thc Panama Electric Company made deposits for 
work to be performed by the municipal forces, amounting to approximately $5,500. 
This Avork consisted of surfacing in their track right of way on C Street, the construe- 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 83 

tion of com-iete landing platform, the furnlsliing of asphalt for various patching jobs 
on their right of way, and the concreting in of their tracks for the grade crossing at the 
site of the old Caledonia Bridge. 

Work Performed for Departments, Divisions, anh Others. 

Under other departments and di'asions of The Panama Canal miscellaneous work 
was performed as follows: 

For tlie electrical division, fortification diAasion, police and fire division, division 
of surveys, and subsistence department only, a miscellaneous amount of work was 
performed on different work requests to the amount of $1,512. 

Building dirision. — A series of miscellaneous work was done amounting to approxi- 
mately .$1'^.773, consisting, in the main, of concrete walk to seamen's home, Balboa; 
municipal work for three tyi)e-18 houses, Balboa; municipal work for Lodge Hall, 
Paraiso; municipal M'ork for nine type-15 cottages, Pedro Miguel; constriiction of 
concrete floor in garage at Ancou; construction of floor for garage, near the National In- 
stitute, Ancon; construction of floor in two garages, Balboa district; construction of 
Hoor and approaches for garage at Pedro Migiiel; municipal work for new National 
Catholic War Community Building. Balboa. 

Supply dcparlinc7iL — -iliscellaneous work to the amount of $10.73cS was jjerformed. 
The more important are as follows: Road construction to new garages; construction of 
roadway to Ball)oa store; ])aving in the vicinity of the new oil storehouse; the laying of 
6-inch cast-iron water line for fire protection and oj)eration of the fuel-oil handling 
plant, Balboa; construction of sidewalks and steps to various lioiis-^s in the district; 
construction oi clotheslines throiighoat the Ancon-Balboa district; installation of 
air tank for the La Boca mess. 

Meclvinicul division. — Miscellaneoiis v/ork to the amount of approximately $2,726 
was performed, the more important items lieing the construction of sidewalks in the 
shops' district, the installation of an indrstrial railway track from their sawmill to 
the boiler house, and the repaviug of certain areas of the shops' roads. 

Health department. — Miscellaneors work Avas performed for this department to the 
amount of apj^roximately $600, consisting of the paving of certain drainage ditches 
and tilling in the \ici)iity of their old larvacide plant, Ancon. 

Murine dirision. — Miscellaneoi s work to the amount of approximately $877 was 
performed. The principal item was the construction of a garbage platform in the 
vicinity of the port ca])tain's office. Balboa. 

Panama Railroad. — For the Panama Railroad Company miscellaneous work was 
performed to the amount of appro?: imately $37,100, the principal item of construction 
being the demolishing of the Caledonia bridge in Panama ( ity and the ccnstruction 
of a grade crossing over the I anama Railroad ( ompany's tracks. This v crk to date is 
95 per cent completed and consists of the folloving: 12,049 cubic yards excavated; 
5,242 square yards subgraded ; the placing of 3,538 square yards of concrete paA'ement 
in roadway and sidewalks; the placing of 5,389 square yards of sheet asphalt wearing 
surface, together v ith the necessary catch basins, drains, and retaining \ alls. 

Another item of construction under this appropriaticn v as the raising of the roadway 
to Fier No. 18. The remaining work consisted of 24 miscellaneors small jots. 

Bureau of cbibs and playgrGunds.- — Ariscellaneous v crk to the amoint of approxi- 
mately $8,495 was performed, consisting mainly of the resurfacing of tennis courts in 
Ancon and Pedro Miguel, the regiading and surfacing of the Palbca tseelall grounds, 
repairs to the running track, the placing of a sheet asphalt flcor in the Ealloa play shed, 
and the installation of water and eev er lines to the Palbca gun club. 

Dredging dirinon. — Miscellaneous work v as performed for this diA isicn to the amount 
of $2,678. This consisted principally of the laying of pipe lines of various si?es for 
supplying their relay pumps in the vicinity of Contractors Bill; 13 jobs "w ere done on 
Panama (anal orders. 

United States Arm]/. — Plans and estimates 'were made up and submitted giving in 
detail all costs and showing the location of the I acif.c side of the Canal covering the 
proposed scheme of the Army board for permanent Army posts in this locality. At 
Quarry Heights military headquarters roads, walks, sewer and water lines v eie laid. 
AtFmpireand Culebra, on the west side of the Canal, 35,000 linear feet of v ater-bound 
macadam road were repaired, ^t Coro^^al 1,235 linear feet of 15-inch concrete pipe 
were laid as a sewer line from the stables. 



>84 THE PANAMA CANAI.. 

A t the new Army poet at Fort Clayton the follov. ing important items of construction 
were performed, the cost of this work, which is now 1)5 per cent completed, amoiinting 
to!?355,K29.12: 

Roads laid square yards . . 23, 779 

Excavation cubic "vards . . 17, 545 

Grading '.do 33, 030 

Temporary railroad track laid feet . . 1 , 882 

Storm sevN ers laid linear feet. . 3, 240 

Box cuherts constructed— 4 by 4 do 03 

Vitrifed and concrete pipe for siBwer system laid — various sizes do. ... 6, 405 

Cast-iron water pipe laid , various sizes, from IG'^ to 14" in diameter do 0, 080 

lead pipe for services, together vith necessary hydrants, "vahes, meters. do 1, 131 

Sheet asphalt Vi earing surface laid square yards. . 13, 183 

Concrete curb and gutter constructed, together vith necessary catch l;asins 

and storm drain:- linear feet. . 17, 842 

Sidewalks laid square yards. . 6, 961 

Concrete eave gutters placed linear feet. .■ 3, 921 

At the Cardenas River bridge a culvert was driven under the present railroad culvert 
to zero elevation as a sanitary measure. This culvert was 3A by 3i feet and 237 feet 
long. There were 1.070 cubic yards of exca^'ation and fill made in connection with 
the sanitation in contiguous areas to the post. For the stables and v.agon sheds there 
were 4,150 snuare yards of concrete floor laid and three concrete water troughs con- 
etructed. This job is 90 per cent com.pleted. 

In addition to the regular construction v ork outlined above for the Army, we were 
called on from time to time to prepare plans and estimates for various work which they 
desired done, and all water and sewer lines in the various posts were maintained. 
Among other items of construction outside of the new post, the following are the most 
important: Installation of water line for the new forage sheds constructed at Corozal, 
vhich necessitated the laying of 1,584 linear feet of 6-inch cast iron water mains and 
the construction of the necessary fire hydrants and vahes; construction of a concrete 
road to Quarry Heights to noncommissioned officers' quarters, consisting of the laying 
of 796 square yards of concrete; and the v idening of the road at Quarry Heights, in 
which were placed 145 square yards of concrete v ith asphalt wearing surface. 

I n Corozal 5, 769 square yards of sheet asphalt wearing surface vere placed on the old 
macadam road at this point after same had been shaped up. There was also installed 
at the pngineer depot at Corozalnecessary fire protection for this point, rhich required 
the lading of 970 linear feet of 6-inch cast-iron pipe and the installation of three fire 
hydrants. 

A t Fort Amador 20,000 square yards of road Mere rolled and treated v,-ith oil and sand . 

United States Nnn/. — The municipal division wis called on from time to time to 
perform miscellaneous jobs lor the United States Navy, this work consisting princi- 
pally of water lines, rep.i.irs to th^h pumping oquipnifnt. and the A'arious roads and 
■sidowalks in their reservation. 

Th'^ following tibie shows material received, expended, and on hand in the Southern 
district as of Julv 1. 1920; 



Material. 



Cement barreJs. 

Sand cubic yards. 

Rock do... 

Gravel do. . . 

Gravel Cstorage) do. . . 

Ltimljcr board measure feet . 

Lumher (native) do. . . 

Reinforcement pounds. 

Pipe, vitrifird, fi-inch feet. 

Pipe, vitririod, s-inch do... 

Pine, vitriOf'd. lO-inch do... 

Pipe, vitrified, 12-inrh do... 

Pifie, ealvanizod iron, '-ineh do... 

Pipe, fralvanized iron, ^-inch do. .. 

Pipp, Ralvani/.od iron, i-inch do... 

Pine, gal vani/;('d iron, 'Mneh do. . . 

Pipe, i-'alvanizod iron, l-inoli do... 

Pipe, galvanized iron, I'.-inch do... 

Pine, galvani/cd iron, l*-inrh do... 

Pipe, galvanized iron, 2-inch do... 

Pipe, galvanized iron, 2J-inch do. . . 



On hand 

June 30, 

1919. 



Received 
1919-20. 



On hand 

and 
received. 



304^ 


13,92.S 


14, 2.32 J 


.■5231 


5,40S 


5,93U 


1,794^ 




1,7943 


301^ 


8,629 


8,9301 


6,739 




. 6,739 


.32.126 


115,950 


14S,076 


2,653 


.S,554 


11,207 


26,248 


125,062 


152.210 


2.566 


3,3.56 


t 5.922 


4,.5S2 


I.SIS 


6,400 


1,7P1 


1,075 


2.866 


1 , 0.<?9 




.' 1.089 


50 


123 


173 


63 


143 


! 206 


124 


3,58 


482 


87S 


1,525 


1 2.403 


1,692 


.542 


2,234 


102 


1.128 


1,230 


562 


126 


[ 688 


1,156 




.; 1,156 


179 




.i 179 



Expended 
1919-20. 



Balance on 

hand June 

30, 1920. 



13,393] 


839 


5.498 


433* 


660 


1.1343 


8,221* 


7083 


560 


6,179 


47,426 


650 


11,207 


■ 


51,344 


866 


5,437 


485 


4,824 


1,576 


1,,842 


1,024 


1,038 


51 


96 


77 


1,'^7 


49 


446 


36 


1,958 


449 


1,886 


348 


1.170 


60 


327 


361 


448 


708 


40 


139 



REPORT OF ENUINEEK OF MAIJSITENANCE. 



85 



Material. 



Pipe, galvanized iron, 3-ineh pounds. 

PijX?, galvanized iron, 3i-ineh do. . . 

Pijje, galvanized iron, 4-inch do. .. 

PiiV, cast iron, 4-inch do... 

Pipe, cast iron, fi-inch do. . . 

Pipe, cast iron, 8-inch do. . . 

Pipe, cast iron, 10-inch do. . . 

Pipe, cast iron, 16-inch do. . . 

(lil, iiiel barrels. 

Motors, water, -.-inch each . 

Motors, water, 1-inch do. . . 

Meters, water, 2-inch do. . . 

Meters, water, 3-inch do. . . 

Pipe, concrete, I'l-inch feet. 

Pipe, concrete, 20-inch do. . . 

Pipe, concrete, 24-inch do. . . 

Leadite ponnds. 

Jute do . . . 

Lead do.. . 

Hydrants each . 

Bricks do . . . 

Meter parts lot . 

Valves, 4-inch each. 

Valves, 6-inch do. . . 

Valves, S-inch do. . . 

Valves, 10-inch do . . . 

Valves, 12-inch do . . . 

Valves, 16-inch do. . . 

Muralite pounds. 

Asphalt do. . . 

Tarvia gallons. 

Binder do. . . 



On hand 

June 30, 

1919. 



41 

42 

44 

120 

660 

44S 



489.21 
152 
65 



2,778 

720 

30 

58 

3,048 

27.041 

23 

92.100 

$704.95 



3,010 

335,800 

947 



Received 
1919-20. 



100 



1,596 



456 
4, 128 
1,791.10 



4 

1 

6,791 



8,982 
50 



SI,. 573. 42 
15 
60 



579,160 
7,412 
1,21U 



On hand 

and 
received. 



41 

42 

144 

120 

2,256 

448 

456 

4,128 

2,280.31 

152 

65 

4 

1 

9,069 

720 

30 

58 

. 3,048 

36,023 

73 

92,100 

$2,278.37 

20 

61 

11 

5 

2 

4 

3,010 

914,960 

8,359 

1,211J 



Expended 
1919-20. 



41 

42 

144 

120 

2,196 

448 

4,56 

3,324 

2.074.89 

151 

31 

4 

1 

7,251 

720 

30 

58 

1,316 

35,678 

51 

14,352 

$1,295.85 

15 

40 

6 

5 

2 

2 

'890,' 54,5'" 
3,642 



Bali,nce on 

hand June 

30, 1920. 



60 



804 

205. 42 

1 

24 



1,818 



1,732 
345 
22 

77, 748 

$982. 52 

5 

21 

6 



2 

3.010 

24.415 

4,717 

1,211* 



NORTHERN DISTRICT, 

Under inuncipal work chargeable to allotments made for (.'anal construction work, 
the sum of $127,4G1 was spent on the following projects: Construction of the watei 
and sewer lines for ten 12-faniily silver quarters at Mount Hope; the construction of 
sidewalks in the vicinity of ("listobal corral; grading, rolling, and installation of sewer 
and water lines and construction of sidewalks in the Gatun district; the laying out, 
grading, installing of water, sanitary and storm sewev lines, grading for and construc- 
tion of concrete streets and sidewalks for the New Cristobal townsite. 

The laying out and putting in of necessary miuiicipal work for the extension of the 
new townsite for Canal employees involved the following work: 

Excavation for fill of 156,719 cubic yards. 

Laying of 22,400 square yards of concrete for streets. 

Installation of 17 catch basins. 

Placing of 1,034 square yards of concrete in slabs for gutters. 

Construction of 16,074 linear feet of curb and gutters. 

Placing of 6,188 square yards of sidewalks. 

Digging of 200 linear feet of ditch for drainage purposes. 

9,200 square yards of finished grading. 

Grading and rolling ?)7,204 square yards of the townsite. 

Construction of 29 manholes and lading of 6,214 linear feet of vitrified pipe. 

8,198 linear feet of cast-iron jjipe for water lines laid, 12-inch, 10-inch, 8-inch, 
()-inch, and 4-inch, in addition to necessary storm sewers laid for draining toAvn- 
site areas. 
Under the head of "ISIaintenance" the sum of $208,647 ^\as spent for the operation 
and upkeep of the pump stations, reservoirs, roads, streets, sidewalks, water and 
sewer lines; also as a charge against maintenance, an electric booster pump of .5,000 
gallons a minute capacity and driven by a 250-horsepower motor was installed. There 
were 21,543 square yards of macadam road repaired and oiled, in addition to the up- 
keep of all roadside ditches and the making of such repairs that were necessary to 
concrete roads in this district. 



86 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



The following is a atatenieat of water pumped at, each of the pump stations during 
the year, giving an average monthly pumping and the average rate per 1 ,000 gallons: 



I'umpinK station. 



Total gallons 

pumped 
during year. 



.\verage I ^'^^erage 
numberof I ,?,'!! i'" 

P-""- P- i Sns ro' 
pumping. 



month. 



Mount Hope 
Agua Clara . . 

Frijoles 

Monte Lirio. 



2,157,fi8fi,000 I 179,807,106 lO.OlU 

427,714,000 35,012,000 .014 

11,020.000 ! 908,333 .1792 

3.204,000 I 272,000 .5317 



The following statement shows the division cost of water delivered in the various 
districts of the Canal Zone during the fiscal vear ended June 30, 1920: 



District. 


Cost per 
thousand 
gallons. 


1 ni.strict. 


Cost per 
thous.ind 
gallons. 


Cri^tohal 

Gatun 


SO. 07 
.14 
.08 
.07 


Pedro Miguel 


S0.07 
.OR 


Gamboa 


Anc'on-I5al boa. . 


.07 


Paraiso 







The sale of water to vessels at the docks was handled as in the past. Water was 
delivered to ships at the rate of 50 cents per 1,000 gallons, with a minimum charge of 
$3, excepting Docks No. 2 and No. 3, where the minimum charge was 50 cents, this 
apphing to small coastwise boats. A total of 2.215 vessels was furnished with 
110,825,282 gallons of water, this being an average of 9,235,440 gallons per month. 

The cost for the year of handling water amounted to §11,527.81. In the city of 
(/olon the sum of $69,055 was spent on the maintenance and repairs of streets, water 
and sewer system, and the cost of water collections and plumbing inspection work. 

The following statement shows the quantity of water used in Colon during the fiscal 
year, by quarters, together with the amount of water rental: 





Paying 
connec- 
tions. 


Consumption per quarter. 


Total con- 
sumption. 


Average 
daily con- 
sump- 
tion. 


Quart er ended — 


Private Panama 
connee- i Railroad 
tions. reservation. 


Panama 
Canal hos- 
pital and 
quarantine. 


Public fire 
hydrants 
and taps. 


Sept. 30, 1919 


984 
987 
992 
998 


Gallons. 1 Gallons. 
73,186,000 i 6,807,7.50 
77,739,750 j 8,087,000 
7.5,028,500 ' 9,133,750 
80,316,2.50 I 8,504,250 


Gallons. 
9,009,750 
8,451,000 
9,49C,.500 
10,477,750 


Gallons. 
56,83/, 150 
07,316,575 
56,902,025 
67, 987, SOO 


Gallons. 
145,930,6.^,0 
161,. 59 1, 325 
150, .560, 775 
167,286,050 


Gallons. 
1,621,452 


Doe. 31, 1919 


1, 795. 492 


Mar. 31, 1920 


1,6/2,897 


June 30, 1920 


1,858,734 






Total for vear. . . 




306,270,500 i 32,532,760 


37,525,000 


249, 043, .550 


625,371,800 


1, 737, 144 









Quarter ended 



Sept. 30, 1919 

Dec. 31, 1919 

Mar. 31, l'.l'20 

June 30, 1920 

Total for year 



Amount 
collected 
from pri- 
vate con- 
sumers. 



S29, 166. 50 
28,9.53.20 
30, 226. 80 
32,524.80 



120,871.30 



Amount 
collected 

from 
Panama 
Railroad. 



.?2,042.70 
2,426.10 
2, 740. .50 
2,551.80 



9,761.10 



Amount 
collected 

from 
Panama 
Canal. 



$2, 732. 70 
2, 536. 50 
2, 8.50. 00 
3,144.90 



11,204.10 



j Average ; 

Total consump- 

revenue i tion per ; 

per quarter, private I 

iconnection. 



$33,9)1.90 
33,91.5.80 
35. 81 7. 30 
38,221.50 



Gallons. 
74,370 
78, /63 
75, 633 
80,4 77 



Average 

private 

quarterly 

bill. 



?29. 64 
29.33 
30. 40 
32.59 



141,896.50 



77,310 



30.49 



Note.— For quarter ended June 30. 1920: 

Is et amount of private bills to be collected t32, 424. SO 

Approximate amount of discount to be collected 100.00 

A pproximate amount to bo collei^ted from private consumers 32, .521. RO 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 87 

Work rEiiFoRMEn fou Departments, Divisions, and Others. 

For other departments and divisions of The Panama ('anal, the United States Army 
and Navv, and outsiders, the work performed was as follows: 

United Stales Armii.--A sum of $:52<>,786 was spent on the post at Fort Davis, 
located at Gatun. The work at this post is approximatelj- S5 per cent completed. 
The principal items of Avork under this expenditure consisted of the necessary design 
work for sewer and water systems, the laying out of the streets and sidewalks, and 
the location of the Iniildings on the ]wst. 

In preparinsi the site 166,20-1 cubic yards of earth were excavated and used foi 
fill; 10J03 linear feet, of temporary railroad track constructed; 9,448 linear feet ol 
sewer line, varying from 24-inch "to 6-inch, with the necessary manholes; 38,170 
square yards of" the area subgraded, graded, and rolled; 320 linear feet of concrete 
box culvert constructed; 16, 922 linear feet of curb and gutter; 34,270 square yardt 
of concrete road built; 9,912 linear feet of cast-iron water pii)e for a distribution system 
laid, the pipe ranging in size from 12 inches to 6 inches; 6,782 linear feet oi 15-inch. 
20-inch, and 24-inch concrete ])ipe laid for storm sewers; 23,051 square yards of finished 
grading, and 1 .030 square yards of grass planted, and 3.860 square yards of sidewalk laid. 

Under the head of Miscellaneous Work for the United States Army, the sum ol 
$22,687 was spent, the principal items of work being as follows: 

At Fort Sherman. 6.255 cubic yards of excavation, 4,087 cubic yards of backfill. 
2,861 square yards ])laced in road slabs, and 492 square yards of sidewalk laid. 

At France "Field, 422 cubic yards of rock and coral were used in the construction 
of 1,596 square yards of temporary roads, 2.960 linear feet of 6-inch drain tile laid. 
706 linear feet of concrete curb constructed, 12.250 square yards of grading done, 
1,344 square yards of grass planted. 1.368 linear feet of 8-inch. 6-inch, and 4-inch 
cast-iron wate"r pipe laid, 824 linear feet of galvanized iron pipe laid, 623 linear feet 
of vitrified pipe laid, and two double tennis courts with concrete foundation. 

Uiiited States Kary.—Yor the United States Navy the sum of $37,786 was spent. 
The principal items of construction were as follows: 

Placing of eave gutters around the 100-man barracks, the performing of the neces- 
sary grading and Installing of sanitary ditches around officers' quarters, and the 
construction of 576 linear feet of sea w"all, the putting in of a baseball park at Coco 
Solo, the placing of concrete walks, the Iniilding of a coal bin. the laying out and 
filling with necessary grading of a ball field at the new a\nation station. The 
above involved the following work: 1,644 cubic yards of excavation, 1,186 cubic yards 
of fill, 150 cubic yards of cinders used. 12 catch basins constructed, the placing of 
182 cubic yards of concrete in the coal bin and sea wall, the placing of 3.022 square 
yards of concrete in street pavements and sidewalks, 3.800 linear feet of concreted 
gutter laid, 2,500 linear feet of open drains, 95.426 square yards of area graded, the 
laving of 1.609 linear feet of sewer pipe and 738 linear feet of water lines. 

'BuUding division. — Under \ariou8 work requests from the building division the 
sum of §47.010 was spent, the principal items of construction being as follows: The 
placing of a 20-inch raw water line from the Mount Hope power i)lant to the cold- 
storage plant; the laving of water and sewer lines to the new .shop building, Cristobal 
docks; the placing of concrete slab under the new stable area in Colon; the putting 
in of necessary road to the new incinerator plant; the installing of a water system 
for Dock No. "3, Colon, the work as a whole involving the following items: 4,540 
cubic yards of excavation, 2,860 cubic yards of backfill, the placing of 2,620 square 
yards of concrete in roadway, the laying of 8.005 square yards of concrete for stable 
area, the lajang of 764 linear feet of" water lines, 2.490 linear feet of 20-inch combi- 
nation sewer and storm drain, and 819 linear feet of new laterals. 

Supply deparimeHf.—lhidor work requests received from the suj^ply department 
the sum of $8,681 was spent. The i)rincipal items of construction were: Lajdng of 
fuel-oil lines to Docks Nos. 13, 14. and 16; construction of loading platform at Mount 
Hope; laying of a 5-incli gasoline oil line from the manifold to the gasoline oil tank. 
The above work involved the following: 345 cubic yards of excavation and backfill, 
the laying of 3.135 linear feet of 5-inch galvanized pipe; the laying of 361 linear feet 
of 4-inch galvanized i)ipe. and the jilacing of 153 square yards of concrete. 

Bureau of duhs and vlaijf/ rounds. —Vnder work requests from this bureau the sum 
of $9,799 was spent. The jn-incipal items of construction involved were: I>aying out 
and putting in two double Unmis courts at (iatun. the resm-facingof the tennis court 
at Cristobal, and the construction of a pii)e fence around the Colon school grounds. 

Land otfice.— On request of the land assent wells were dug at the new town of C hagres, 
located i"n the Republic of Panama. To date, a total of 1,640 feet has been drilled, 
water being found in only one location. 

Miscellaneous.— Vmle.r' the head of Miscellaneous Work performed for The Panama 
Canal (P. C. No. 431), the sum of $9,417 was expended. This covered small jobs for 
various di\'ision8 and departments of The Panama Canal. 



88 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Work/or outsiders. — For outsiders a sum of $791 was expended, which included the 
making of water and sewer connecti >ns for private parties in the city of Colon, the 
I'onstructiou of a new curb line for Slifers' Park, Colon, and the laying out and con- 
strue tion of an athletic track for the Fourth of July committee at Cristobal. 

I'ayjamn RailmnH Cnvipany.— On authorities issued l>y the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, the sum of :?348,424 was spent. The principal items of work under the authority 
were as follows: 

F'illing, grading, installation of water, sewer, and storm-sewer lines, concrete roads 
and siden-alks for the new silver townsite located bet>veen Mount Hope and New 
Cristobal, this area requiring a fill of 47,800 cubic yards; the development of block 54 
as a warehouse site, which included fill, grading, water, sewer, storm sewers, streets, 
and railroad tracks; the development of the new residential area in Colon between 
Seventh and Ninth and G and K Streets, this requiring the towiisite layout; the 
grades for fills^ the in.stallatiou of water, sewer, and storm-sewer lines; the laying of 
concrete streets and sidewalks; the construction of a concrete road from the new cold- 
storage plant to the Margarita-lMount Hope Road ; the extension of the concrete roads 
to Pier No. 6; the laying out of and the putting in of the necessary water, sewer, 
streets, and concrete floors for the new stable area in Colon; the construction of a 
circulating water system from the Mount Hope filtration plant to the new cold-storage 
plant; the installation of water and sewer lines for the new railroad station located 
in the vicinity of the Army post at New Gatun, besides a miscellaneous number 
of small jobs at various localities. 

The principal items of work involved were laying of 47,228 square yards of con- 
crete sidewalks and streets; placing of 13,436 square yards of concrete in stable area; 
construction of 31,365 linear feet of concrete curb aiid gutter; laving of 1,104 linear 
feet of 20-inch and 24-inch concrete pipe; laying of 2,911 feet of 20-inch concrete 
pipe line for water circulation at the cold-storage plant; the rolling of 181,100 square 
yards for roads and building sites; the laying of 1,900 linear feet of permanent railroad 
track for warehouse area; the laying of 24,767 linear feet of 12-inch, 10-inch, 8-inch, 
6-inch and 4-inch water lines; laying of 11,000 feet of 20-inch, 15-inch, 12-inch, 10- 
inch, and 6-inch sewer lines; the laying of 2,074 linear feet of 2^-inch, 2-inch, 
and 1-inch galvanized }n])e line for water distribution in stable area and for a water 
supply at Manav\-a plantation. 

The following is a list of the more important items of stock material used on con- 
struction and maintenance work in the Northern district during the fiscal year: 

Cement barrels.. 41, 606 

Gravel cubic vards. . 33, 418 

Sand ;;do 5, 085 

Lumber feet b. m . . 269, 609 

Reinforcing pounds. . 172, 280 

('oncrete pipe, 15-inch linear feet. . 2, 739 

Pipe, 20-inch do 4, 041 

Pipe, 24-inch do 3, 400 

Lead pounds . . 65, 459 

Vitrified sewer pipe, 6-inch, 8-inch, 10-inch, 12-inch, and 15-inch .linear feet. . 49, 249 

Galvanized pipe, A'arious sizes do 24, 797 

Second-hand galvanized pipe in various sizes do 5, 839 

Coal pounds. . 384, 100 

Concrete drain tile, 4-inch feet . . 1 . 600 

Extra heavy pipe, 12-inch do 100 

('ast-iron valves, various sizes, 4 to 20 inches 329 

Fire hydrants 70 

Asphalt pounds. . 43, 565 

Tarvia gallons. . 1, 321 

Meter parts dollars. . 1, 513. 20 

Miscellaneous cast-iron fittings do 1 , 908. 28 

('rude oil barrels. . 307. 53 

OPERATION OF WATER-PURIFICATION PLANTS AND TESTING LABOR.\TORIES. 

The following is a rejwrt of work performed by the chemical section of the testing 
laboratories at Miraflores during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920: 

Number of 
samples analyzed. 

Asphalt and tar\ ia 3 

Asphalt wearing surface 34 

Miscellaneous work, including samples of paints, asphaltic enamels, oils, sand, 

lime, alum, coal, ores, alloys, electrolytes, soap polishes, water samples, etc. . 271 



REPORT OF ENGINKER OE MAINTENANCE. 



89 



The following is a summary of the report of work performed in couiiectiou wdth 
the operation of water-purification plants during the 11 months ended May 31, 1920: 



Placed in sen-ice . 
District supplied. 

Source of supply. 



Rated capacitv, jjallons per day 
Method of puriRcation 



.feet. 



Aeration basin: 

Si c 

Number of no'.zles 

Sedimentation basin: 

Si e feet.. 

Depth do — 

Capacity gallons.. 

Period of sedimentation, 
(hours I. 
Rapid sand filters' 

Number of units 

Total sand are.3,s:iuare feet. 
Depth of filtering material- 
Sand inches . . 

Gra'"el do 

Size of filtering material: 

Sand, e'ecti- e si e 

.Sand, uniformity coefficient 

Gra'el.si e. . ..". ...inches.. 

Percent o'sand area co'ered by 

hori onta! area of troughs. 
Washing of filters: 

Vertical rise per minute, 

(inches', 
(iallons per square foot of 
sand area. 

Filter bottom , type 

T.oss of head: 

Average initial feet. . 

A verage fnial feet. . 

Length of filter runs, hours, 

yeariv a'>'era.ge. 
Volumes of water, average gal- 
lons per dav: 

Raw " 

Filtered 

Deli ered to mains 

Wash water 

Per cent of wash water 

(^hemicals, yeariv averages: 
.\lum, pounds per million 

gallons. 
Lime, pounds per million 

gallons. 
Li -uid chlorine, parts per 
million of available chlo- 
rine. 
Phvsical and chemical charac- 
teristics of filtered water, 
parts per million: 

< olor 

Turbiditv 

Free carbonic acid (CO2; 

Carbo'ia'e (("O3) 

.Mkalinitv, ervthrosine 
(CaCOs). 

Hardness, soap (CaCOs) 

Owgcn consumed 

Chlorine (01) 

Iron(Fe) 

SoUds total 

Nitrogen, as — 

Nitrites (NO5) 

Nitrates (NO3) 

Colonics of bacteria per c. c. in 
wafer from distribution in 
system: 

Nutrient agar at 37.5° (' 

B. ' oli index, number per 
liter. 



.Vgua Clara. 



Mount Hope. 



Mira'Iores. 



Dec. 29, 1911 

Gatun, Toro Point. 



.\gua Clara Reservoir. 

2,.i(W,000 

.\eralion, sedimenta- 
tion, rapid sand fil- 
tration. 



' 4 by 8. 



70.5 by 71 . 
in.5..".... 
3,50,000... 
10 



4 

l,l,5f). 



0.44 

l.Fl.... 
AtolJ. 
22.3.... 



19 

12 

Harrislnirg. Pa. 



0.5. . 
6.5.. 
66. S. 



1,181,000. 
1 ,160,000. 
1 139.000 
21,000... 
1.77 



370... 
SO. . . . 
0.32J . 



4.... 
0.... 
0.... 
0.7. . 
18.4. 

37.4. 
1.73. 
7.2.. 
0.16. 
86... 



0.0005. 
0.016.. 



Feb. 23, 1914 

Coloii. Mt. Hope, Mar- 
garita Point. Cris- 
tobal. 

Bra'os Brooke Reser- 
voir. 

8,000.000 

Aeration, sedimenta- 
tion, rapid sand fil- 
tration. 



60 by 66. 
85 



171 by 171. 

12.25 

2.500,000... 
14 



3,078. 



0.41... 
1.70... 
i to 1^. 
32.0... 



Mar. 14,1915. 

Pedro Miguel, Coro-'al, 
Ancon, Palboa, Pan- 
ama, Paraiso. 

( hagres River. 

15,000,000. 

.Veration, sedimenta- 
tion, rapid sand fil- 
tration. 

80 bv 130. 
105. 

300 bv 125. 
16..5. " 
4. .500, 000. 
12. 



14. 
5,950. 



20 

12.5 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



30. 
24. 

0.41. 
1.70. 
Atol?. 
32.8. 



24. 
15. 



1.3.. 
12.5. 
33.3. 



6,116,000. 
6,014,000. 
5.884.000. 
130,000.. 
2.15 



128. 



0... 
0... 
2.4. 



0. 
38.0. 

37.9. 
1.2.. 
5.2.. 
0.09. 
82... 



0.0000. 
0.007.. 



Concrete false bottom. 

1.0. 

11.5. 

37.4. 



9,9.58,000. 
9,792,000. 
9,.542 000. 
249,000. 
2.55. 



160. 



0.374. 



0. 

0. 

4.3. 

0. 

49.5. 

48.6. 

0.6. 

6.7. 

0.03. 

100. 



0.0002. 
0.021. 



15.4. 
7.9. 



> Aerator box. 



90 



THK PANAMA CANAI^. 



Conneic teM specimens made and broken dnring the fiscal year ended June JO, 1920. 
(Cylinders 6 inches in diameter and 12 inches high.) 





Runs 
sam- 
pled. 


Cylinders. 




Age of concrete in days. 






Made. 


BroAcn. 


7 


28 


90 


120 


180 


691 


Paci'^c roads 


■ 47 

8 

28 

160 

09 

3 

2 




•636 

128 

416 

2,356 

980 


508 

80 

348 

1,596 

ssn 


64 
32 
84 
436 
176 
12 


192 


144 


104 


4 






28 20 
108 96 
572 352 
232 100 

12 12 
8 8 






60 
216 

72 






Mira"ores Dump ^ 


20 






48 36 
24 24 
3 






('oiicrele seAvc-r pipe - 


8 








3 














Total 


317 


4,588 3,175 


804 


1, 132 732 


400 


24 


3 



' Building construction, Army post. 
2 At Miraflorcs Armv Post. 

'These cylinders were immersed in the carbolic-acid tank on Dee. 22, 1918, and were removed after a 
period of 457 days. 

The following table shows the status of capital cost for municipal improvements in 
Panama and Colon: 



Items. 



Cost of original water and sower system within city prior to July 1, 1910 

Cost 01 original pavements within city prior to July 1, 1910 

Cost of extensions to v.ater and sewer systems within city prior to July 1, 1910 

Cost of extensions to pavements prior to July 1, 1910 

Interest on capital cost water and sower systems and pavements prior to July 

] , 1910 

Proportion interest on capital cost reservoirs, pumping stations, and pipe lines 

prior to July 1, 1910 

Cost of maintenance water and sewer systems and pavements, and proporticn 

cost of maintenance reservoirs, pumping stations and pipe lines prior to July 

1, 1910 

Water rental collections prior to July 1, 1910 , 

Capital Cost Water and sewer systems ard pavements, Jiiy 1, 1920' 

Capital cost reservoirs, pipe lines, pump stations and filter plants in Zone July 

1, 19201 



Panama. 

S504, 911. 57 
447, 966. 00 
122, 165. 92 
92, 193. OS 

77, 742. 27 

6, 216. 66 



99,617.17 

212, 375. 20 

1, 106, 926. 48 

1, 765, 222. 58 



Colon. 



§314,760.99 
221,070.29 
169. 581. 52 
88,967.20 

43,>814.47 

6, 125. 16 



145, 025. 27 
200, 410. 74 
980, 222. 25 

5S5, 642. 89 



' Panaman G overnment pays a proportion of interest on these sums at 2 per cent based on relation of total 
quantity of water used in Panama and Cobn to total quantity produced by system. 

PANAMA. 



Fiscal year ending- 



June 30, 1911.., 
June 30, 1912... 
JiuieaO, 1913 1. 
.rune30, U)14.., 
Jim^.'iO, 1915... 
June 30, 1915... 
June 30, 1917.., 
June .30, 1918... 
June 30, 1919... 
June 30, 1920... 



Total. 



New con- 
struction 
in city. 



854, 609. 74 

38, 745. 05 

1, 815. 77 

1,50.5,37 

5, 034: 13 



Mainte- 
nance work. 



Interest. 



53, 960. .58 
104,932.64 



330,121.03 
35, 503. 86 
38, 470. 70 

104,469.25 
88, 414. 68 
84, 543. 88 
97, 744. 09 
94, 966. 25 

110,749.46 

126, 423. 17 



262,971.74 811,466.37 



Applied in 

amortiza- 

I tion of 

capital 

cost. 



$25, 759. 
26, 532. 
27, 468. 
29, 086. 
24, .50,5. 
32, 004. 
30, 404. 
29, 632. 
29, 166. 
31,574. 



286, 222. 84 



611.99 
G51. 54 
937. 71 
648. 88 
247. 78 
283. 10 
283. 07 
283.04 
459. 76 
076. 47 



294,483.34 



Water rent- 
als, includ- 
ing defi- 
ciencies. 



$78, 467. 71 
97, 772. 26 
114,876.55 
166,204.42 
138, 167. 91 
141,921.19 
153,431.31 
149, 8.81. 52 
165, 375. 53 
186, 074. 15 



1,392,172.55 



COLON. 



June 30, 1911 1?188, 114. 24 

June 30, 1912 ' 84. 52S. 41 

Jimc 30, 1913 ' 88, 071. 07 

June 30, 1914 , 14, 302. 97 

June 30, 1915 1 1 , 4 13. 33 

June 30, 1916 | 1, 908. 82 

June 30, 1917 1 54, 876. .54 

June .30, 1918 1 4, 799. 90 

June 30, 1919 1 3, 787. 14 

June 30, 1920 | 2, 388. 59 



Total 444,191.01 653,122.31 



111.09 
470. 85 
161. 60 
.542. 71 
125. 55 
171. 60 
774. 81 
490. 70 
887. 25 
386. 15 



$19,041, 
21,774. 
24, 101. 
26, 292. 
26,611. 
26, 256. 
25, 062. 
25,463, 
24,21)2. 
23, 179. 



242,045.10 



, 019. SO 
994. 40 
553. 23 
388. 05 
513. 22 
51)9. 28 
868. 25 
992.66 
137. 31 
177. 14 



229, 213. 94 



$78, 870. 28 
98,541.48 
98, 816. 49 
112,223.74 
115,250.24 
135, 996. 90 
119,705.28 
126, 946. 88 
122, 286. 78 
125, 723. 28 



1,134.361.35 



Indicates credit by adjustment. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



91 



Section of Meteorology and Hydrography. 

The section of meteorolop;y and liydrograjAy continued to keej) 
the permanent records of weather conditions on the Canal Zone, the 
hydrok)gy of Gatun Lake watershed, and tlie hydrographic c(.ndi- 
tions at the Atlantic and Pacific ports of the Canal. Special investi- 
gations were carried to conclusion and report as indicated in the re- 
port of the chief hydrographer, which follows : 

.'^ECTiox OF Meteorology and Hydroghaphy. 
R. Z. Kirlpofricl, Chief Hydrographer. 

Report on meteorological and hydrographic work and conditions for the calendar 
year ]919 and the months of January to June inclusive, 1920, is submitted herewith. 

The section of meteorology and hydrography continued to keep the yjermanent 
records of weather conditions on the Canal Zone, the hydrologies of the Gatun and 
Mirafiores Lakes watershed and the Chagres River, and the hydrographic conditions 
at the terminals of the ("anal. Special investigations and reports were concluded 
and reportf^d on as outlined in the report of the chief hydrographer. 

PERSONNEL. 

Mr. G. E. Matthew returned from military service and was reinstated as meterolo- 
gist August 14, 1919. 

Mr. G. J. Bentley, meteorologist, resigned, effective September 18, 1919. 

Mr. A. L. Amole, temporary clerk, was temporarily employed from June 1, 1920, 
to July 6, 1920. 

Mr. S. Gottlich, observer, was emjjloyed on June 24, 1920, to fill a new position of 
observer at Cristobal. 

Mr. R. L. Mitchell, hydrographer, resigned, effective June 29, 1920. 

METEOROLOGY. 

General. — But slight changes were made during the year in the meteorological sta- 
tions. All stations mentioned in the 1919 annual report were continued in operation 
and the following new ones were established: 

A standard rain gage was installed at La Palma, at the mouth of the Tuira River, 
Province of Panama, December, 1919. It is operated by the naval radio station at 
that point. 

Standard rain-gage stations were also installed at Divala. Province of Chiriqui; 

Mariato, Province of Veraguas; and Mandinga Bay, Province of Colon, during the dry 

'season of 1920. It is believed that these new rainfall stations will be of valuein 

studying general isthmian storms. All these are cooperative stations and the section 

of meteorology and hydrography is at the expense of furnishing the rain gage only. 

Precipitation. — RainfaUfor the calendar year 1919 was beloiv normal at all stations 
in the Canal Zone and vicinity, except Cape Mala, Taboga. Chilibrillo, and Bocas del 
Toro. The deficiencies ranged from 4.19 inches at Juan Mina to 32. 14 inches at Brazos 
Brook. The rainfall was unequally distributed throxighout the year, being unusually 
heavy in April, moderately heavy in October, and generally seasonally deficient 
during the remaining months of the year. At most stations October was the month of 
heaviest and March the month of lightest rainfall. 

Annual totals ranged from 57.59 inches at Ballwa to 147.45 inches at Porto Bello. 
The average rainfall in the Pacific section was (53.39 inches; in the Central section 
79.11 inches, and in the Atlantic section 109.89 inches. The greatest amount of 
precipitation recorded on any one day was 9.09 inches at Porto Bello on April 23. 1919. 
Daily quantities of 4 inches or more were recorded as follows: 



Station. 


Date. 


Rainfall. 


Station. 


Date. 


Rainfall. 


Porto Bello 


Apr. 19 


Inches. 
5.44 
4.21 
9.09 
5.12 
•1.10 
4.78 




Sept. 8-9 


I7ichcs. 
4.01 




do 




Oct. 8-9. 


4.43 


Porto Bollo 


\pr. 23. . . 




Oct. 10 


4.04 


Do 


Apr. 24 




Oct. 22-23 


4.06 




Aug. 7 


Boca> del Toro 


Dec. 10 


4.64 


Porto Bello 















92 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



The I'o'ir moiitlis" dry s(nisou rainfall for 1920 is the loirenl on record since American 
occnpation, in 1904, being slightly lower than the previous driest dry season of 1912. 
Dry season conditions continncnl until about the middle of May. wliereas they iisually 
end in mid-April. The rainfall for the first six montlis of 1920 has been below normal 
throughout tlie Zone and vicinity, the deficionc'y being most pronounced in the 
-Vtlantic section. 

The monthly rainfall for 1919 and the first half of 1920 and the station averages are 
presented in Tal>le No. 1. The maximum rainfall of record for ])eriods of five minutes, 
one hour, and twenty-four hoiirs are shown in Table No. 2. The monthly distribution 
of rainfall in 1919 at selected stations, compared with monthly normals, is shown 
graphically on Plato No. 12, and the distribxition of annual rainfall in the ("anal Zone 
is shown on Plate No. 13. 

Air temperature. — The average air temperature for the year Vas slightly above the 
normal. The highest temperatures of the year occxirred in general in February and 
April, and the lowest in March. 

The means and extremes in air temperature for tlie calendar year 1919 are presented 
in the following table: 



Station. 



Balhoa Heif^hts 

Oamboa 

Alhajuela 

Oatun 

Colon 



Afaximum. 


Miniimun. 


" F. 


Dale. 


" F. 


Date. 


94 


Feb. 6 


67 


Mar. 20 


94 


Apr. 11 


06 


iMar. 21 


93 


'Fob. 14 


61 


Mar. 22 


92 


Apr. 26 


70 


iMar. 19 


92 


.Tune 2 


71 


Dec. 13 



Annual 
mean. 



1 And other dates. 



The maximum and minimum temperatures of record at the various stations are given 
below (records revised to June 30, 1920): 



Station. 



Maximiun. 



Minimum. 


Annual 




average. 


F. 


Dat". 




m 


Tan. 27,1910 


80. 2 


tW 


Feb. 5, 1917 


79 3 


fiO 


'Mar. 7,1920 


78.9 


66 


Aug. 7, 1912 


80.4 


66 


Dec. 3, 1909 


79.8 



Years 

of 
record. 



Balboa Height 

Gamhoa 

Alhajuela 

Oattm 

Colon 



F. 



Datr. 
Apr. 7, 1912 
Apr. 11,1920 
Apr. 13,1920 
Apr, 18,1920 
Apr. 12,1920 



' And other dates. 

NoTK. — The lo've^t temne^ature of record on the Isthmus since .\mei'ican occupation iu 1004 is .W F., 
recordeJ at !?a^ Obispo (near ''iamboa^ on February 9, 1907. The minimum temperature of record at 
.Vlhajuela should read 60° F., instead of 58° F. recorded in the 1918 annual report. 

The highest temperature of record on the Isthmus, 98° F., was recorded at Alhajuela 
on April 13, 1920. 

The air temperature during the first six months of 1920 has been above normal 
throughoit the Zone. 

Monthly temperature records and other metorological data at the two principal 
stations are preseiited in Tables Nos. 3 and 4. 

Winds. — The annual wind movement in the Canal Zone for the calendar year 1919 
was generally above normal. March was the month of greatest wind movement, 
while the least wind movement occurred generally in June and September. North- 
west, north, and northeast winds ])revailed at all stations, although there was a con- 
siderable percentage of southerly and variable winds during the rainy season months. 

The average hourly wind movement, i)revailing direction, and maximum velocities 
at the A'arious stations for the calendar year 1919 are presented in the following table: 



REPORT OF KXGIXKETt OF MAIXTENAXCK. 
Cnlnidar year lOl'K 



93 



station. 



SosaHill 

Pall oa Heights 
PeJro Miguel... 

0am boa 

fiatiin 

Colon 



Ave-age wind 


raoveiueiit (miles 


per hour). 


1919 


Annual 




average. 


12.7 
S. 1 




7.5 


5.7 


5.« 


.5.5 


.5.0 


6.2 


7.1 


10.7 


10.4 



Prevailing 
direction. 



Northwo'st 

..do 

..do 

Northeast. 
North -.vest 
North 



-Vfaxinmm velocitv. 



iMiles. Direction. Hate 



Fast 

Northwest 

WeU 

Northea:-:t. 

South 

North 



.\ug. 5 
Mar. 7 
Aug. 15 
Sept. 26 
.Tune 17 
Nov. 28 



The followins; tabic, revised to June :iO. 1920. gives the maximum wind velocities 
of record at stations in the Canal Zone. 



Station. 



Maximum velocit\-. 



Miles. Direction. 



Sosa Hill 

Balboa Heights 
Pedro Miguel . . 

Gamboa 

Gatnn 

Colon 



Date. 



Fasti Aug. 5,1919 

South Julv 10,1909 

Northeast. Sept. 23,1912 



do. 
South. 
North. 



Seut. 20, 1919 
June 17,1019 
Apr. 1,1915 



Years 

of 
record. 



> 48 miles from the south was also recorded on So«a Hill on .Tune 11, 191.'?. 



Thn wind movement during th? first six months of 1920 was generally above norma], 
Sosa Hill being the on'y stition haAdng a slight deficiency. This station, however, 
has been in operation but three years. 

Atmospheric prcsanrf. — The mcTn atmospheric pressure foi' the calendar year 1919 
was slightly below normal on both coasts. March was the month of highest pressure 
and June the month of lowest aA^erage pressure. 

Relative humidity. — The mean relative humidity of the atmosphere for the calendar 
yeir 1919 was abort 8?. por cent on both coasts. March and October were the months 
of lowest and highest humidity, respectively, on the Pacific coast; on the Atlantic 
coast Jr.ly was the month of highest average humidity and December the month 
of lowest aA'erage humidity. 

rVourfuif.?.«. — The average daytime cloudiness for the calend.u' year 1919 was above 
normal on the Atlantic coast and below normal on the Pacific. January, March, 
and Deceml>er were the months of least cloudiness, while the greatest cloudiness 
occurred in June and July. 

Ernpnrtion. — The evaporation for the calendar year 1919 was the liighest on record 
on both coasts, but over the lake surface at Gatun it was slightly below the eight- 
year average. 

During the first six months of 1920 the evaporation was generally above? normal, 
due to unusual length and dryne.«s of the drj- season. 

Fogs. — One light and one clense fog occurred at the Pacific entrance, and three 
light fogs occurred at the Atlantic entrance during the year 1919. The usual condi- 
tions of frequent night and early morning fogginess prevailed at interior stations 
during the rainv season. Practicallv all fogs observed lifted or were dissipated bv 
8.30 a.m. 

Se-i, Chogres River, and Gatun Lake water temperatures. — The surface temperature 
of the sea was slightly above normal on both coasts. Records for the calendar year 
1919 are given in the table following. 



94 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Te))ipfraturc of the sea, Gatun Lake, and Chayrex Ricer. lUiy. 



Station. 



Balboa (Panama Bay) 

Colon (Caribbean Sea, 

Gamboa (Gatiin Lake) 

Gatun 1 (Gatun Lake) 

Alhajuela ' (Chagres River) 



Maximum. 
F. Date. 



Minimum. 



I " F. 



Several dates. 

Juno 2 

Several dates. 

.May 21 

-Vpr. ;j 



Date. 



Mar. 12 

Several dates 

Nov.8 

Several dates 
Sept. 30 , 



1919 
mean . 



Annual 
aver- 
age. 



80.4 79.9 

82.4 82.2 

83.0 I 

83.6 1 

79.1 1 



' From daily readings at 8 a. m. and 2 p. m. Bihourly readings at other stations. 

Seifimologji. — Thirty-three seismic disturbances were recorded at the Balboa Heights 
seismological station during the tiscal year 1920. Most of tliese disturbances went 
slight tremors originating within 500 miles of the Oanal Zone, and seA'eral shocks 
were less thin 100 miles distant. Those shocks with epicenters less thin 100 miles 
distant, though light, were sometimes fe^t by a iiumlier of people in the Canal Zone. 
(~)nly a few tremors gave evidence of far distant origin. All sei.smic disturbances 
recorded during the year were too light to cause damage to Oanal strictures. 

The numl^ev of seismic disturbances recorded by months during th" past fi.^^cal 
year are shown in the following table: 



1919 


1920 


Month. 


Niunber 
of shocks.' 


\rpnth Number 
^f^'"'^- of shocks.' 


July 


4 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 


.Tanuarv 4 


.\ukust 


February 6 


September 


March <i 


October 


April 2 


November 


May 3 




Juno 







» Total, 33. 

SPECIAL INVK.STIC.ATIONS. 

Special reports summarizing meteorological conditions in tln^ Oana! Zone, based 
on a study of the records, v\-ere made to you as follows: 

1. Weather predictions from local barometer readings. 

2. Soil temp.-;ratures in the Oanal Zone. 

o. Eirthquakes' in Panama up to January I. 1920. 
A. Evaporation in the Oanal Zone. 
5. Pfumidity and hot weather. 
(). Panama rainfall. 

7. Panama thunderstorms. 

8. Sunshine and cloudiness in the Oanal Zone. 

Several of these reports were published in the Monthly Weather Review, United 
States Weather I'ureau, and The Panama Oanal Record. 

Pilot Balloon Fliguts. 

Heginniiig June 1, 1920. this office has been making an S a. m. single theodolite 
balloon flight daily, excej)! Sunday or holidays, or day.^ of poor visilulity, in coopera- 
tion with the Navy aviation lield at Ooco Solo, in "a study of upper air currents. 
Balloons are observed in azimuth and altitud(t angle at one minute, or approximate 
200-meter intervals, with special theodolite. 

The following pht3s and tabks accompany this report: 

Plate No. 12. >ronthly rainfall, 1919, and station averages. 

Plate No. 13. Distribution of rainfall in the Oanal Zone, muxinium, minimum, 
current and a"\'erage yeai's. 

Table .No. 1. Monthly rainfall in the Oanal Zone and vicinity, and station averages. 

Table No. 2. Maximmn rainfall in the Oanal Zone and vicinity. 

Table No. W. Monthly meteorological data. Balboa Heights, Oanal Zone, year 1919. 

Table No. 4. Monthly meteorological data. Colon, year 191«t. 

Table No. 5. Monthly evaporation in the Oanal Zone. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



95 



Tablk No. \.~ Monthly rnin/all m the Canal Zone and vicinity, 1919. 1920, and 

station averages, 
[Values in inches.] . 



Year. 



1919 

1920 

-Vverasje, 21 years.. 
IJalboa Heights: 

1919 

1920 :.., 

Avera'^c, 22 years. . . 
Miraflores: 

1919 

1920 

Avera-'e, 11 years... 
Pedro MiiTuel: 

1919.: 

1920 

Averace, 12 years. . 
Rio (irande: 

1919 

1920 



Jan. 



Average. 15 years. . . 
Culebra: 

1919 

1920 

Avera'je, 29 years. . . 
Camacbo: 

1919 

1920 

-VveraTe, 13 yeirs. . . 
Empire: 

1919 

1920 

-Vvenije, 1.5 years. . . 
Oamboa: 

1919 

1920 

.Vvera^e, 37 years. . . 
.Tuan Mina: 

1919 

1920 

.Vvera^e, 9 years 

.\lhainela: 

1919 

1920 

.^vera'je, 20 years. . . 
Vigia: 

1919 

1920 

-Vvera'^e, 11 ye;irs... 
Frijoles: 

1919 

1920 

.Vvera^e, 18 years. . . 
Trinidad: 

1919 

1920 

Avera'-e, 12 years... 
Monte Lirio: 

1919 

1920 

Average, 12 years. . . 
Oatnn: 

1919 

1920 

.Vvera''e, 15 years. . . 
Brazos Brook: 

1919 

1920 

.\vera^e, 13 years... 
Colon: 

1919 

1920 

Average, 49 vears . . . 
Porto Bello: 

1919 

1920 

Avora<;e, 8 years 



0.13 
T. 
1.02 

.28 
T. 
1.00 

.16 
.03 
1.73 

.18 
.03 
1.16 

.61 
.03 
1.15 

.62 
.05 
1.56 

1.03 
.22 
1.03 

.,50 
.15 

.78 

..55 
.05 
1.73 

.97 
.16 
.72 

.75 
.52 
1.02 

.93 

.24 

.82 

1.61 
.31 
1.89 

2.47 

.60 

2.76 

4.03 

..37 

2.86 

1.42 

.71 

3.09 

2.48 

.30 

3.13 

1.82 

.51 

3.81 

4.31 
2.52 
6.47 



Feb. i Mar. 



Apr. 



0.06 T. 6.32 

T. ; .35 3.54 

.60 I .63 3.92 

T. I T. 6.43 

T. : .09 3.02 

.SO i .65 3.09 



.00 
.00 
1.01 

T. 

.07 
.67 

.02 
.05 

.08 



.05 ! 
.10 
.65 ! 

.21 
.05 

.84 

.24 
.05 
.73 

.21 
.10 

.85 

.04 
.12 
1.19 

.04 
.15 
.74 

.00 
.13 
1.51 

.52 

.25 

2.18 

.34 

.40 
2.51 

1.15 

.71 

3.12 

.54 
1.00 
2.68 

.70 

.56 

3.05 

.36 
..54 
1.65 

1.58 
1.61 
3.57 



.00 
.02 
.41 

T. 
.04 
.32 

.00 
1.30 

.27 

T. 

.81 
..56 

.08 
..57 
.40 



.5.79 
3.60 
4.32 

6. 58 
5.08 
4.43 

6.44 
l.;iO 
3. 66 

7.41 
1.20 
3.82 

8. .52 
1.81 
3.80 



.05 7.52 

.80 1.51 

.33 I 3.71 

.03 I 7.02 

. 21 1. 48 

. 72 3. 69 



.04 
1.00 
.22 

.07 
.20 
.47 

.01 
.22 
.39 



13.62 
1.46 
4.50 

9.06 

.83 

3.80 

10.02 

.64 

3.82 



.47 10.07 

.05 

. 57 5. 15 



.38 
.94 
1.90 

.59 

.78 

2. 22 

..59 

.71 

2.07 



6.34 
1.13 
.5.10 

11.66 

.08 

5.75 

12.04 
.14 
6.01 



.73 12.48 

.90 I ..35 

2. 10 i 5. 61 



.61 110.95 6.95 
1.08 I 1.72 5.4' 
l.,59 4.35 |12.60 



May. 



5.92 
2.24 



5.21 
3.31 
8.46 

6.07 
4.:5S 
9.03 

7.37 
7.45 
10.59 

6.35 

7.38 
10. 53 

6.90 

6.78 
10.99 

5.08 
9.27 
11.07 

7.01 
7.66 
9.92 

5.82 
7. .50 
10.70 

7.77 
3.98 
10.57 

6.11 
4.46 
11.92 

4.30 
6.07 
11.31 

8.28 
4.02 
11.47 

7.28 
9.31 
13. 03 

5.20 
6.34 
12.50 

7.16 
2.65 
13.92 

8.71 
4.99 
13.32 



1.18 30.21 
1.07 2.67 
2. 14 8. 50 



13. 86 
5.05 
17.06 



Jime. 



7.75 
4.42 
7.32 

8.93 
4.83 
7. .56 

4.60 

9.S7 
8.28 

3.99 
10.02 
8.99 

0.23 
11.78 
8.96 

5. 73 
12. 08 
8.73 

6.77 
11.83 
9.54 

.5.57 
11.01 
8.50 



July. 



Aug. 



i 7.f3 
4.75 



7.69 
8.03 



8.14 
7.30 



7.54 
5.82 



7.72 
4.02 



Sept. 

8.46 
7. 04 
10.84 



8.33 



8.16 
7.61 



8.26 
9.95 



9. 81 9. 44 
7. 52 8. 58 



9.:37 

8.89 



6.02 

7.48 
9.6S 



9.66 

7.72 
8.' 89 
6.70 



5. .50 
5.78 
10.50 

6.87 
11.16 
12.23 

7.07 
10. 23 
12.91 

5.85 
10.20 
9.69 



12.30 
10. 63 
10. 32 



8.16 
7.86 
12.30 

12.54 
7.38 
12.62 

11.70 
7.96 
14.40 

12. 08 
13.29 
13. 35 

0.04 
0.17 
•5. 23 



10.12 
11.14 



9.66 
13.46 



12.49 
13.92 



12. 35 
10.50 



9.92 
5.67 



8.94 
9.37 



10.00 
8.63 



9.43 
8.49 
'9.'i2 
7.37 



11.77 
9.32 



11.63 
8.11 



12.30 

7.82 



12.23 
10.19 



10. 26 
6.78 



10.20 
10.17 



11.62 ill. 73 
7.86 i 9.07 



11.68 |13.99 

I 
9.28 111. 10 



15.02 14.45 
13.60 6.77 



15.97 114.83 
24.23 17.76 

i8."84' ig.os' 



9.14 
9.38 



8.87 
10. 89 



10.40 
11.73 



10. 77 
12.21 



10.45 
11.04 

's.'g-i 

9.39 



10. 38 
13.85 



12.07 
9.35 



11.58 
11.96 



13.03 
13.50 



11.34 
8.44 



11.00 

15.48 



13. 04 
8.42 



10. 05 
10.55 



12.24 
11.74 



12. 65 
14.37 
i3.'43 



Oct. Nov. 



11.82 



9. 44 9. 1 1 
12.11 4.97 



Dec. 



11.54 5.47 



12.00 1 10. 42 
11.25 I 6.02 



11.79 10.82 

16.37 i 6.66 

i 

12.74 !ll.27 

15.62 i 7.40 



11.. 56 
13. 66 
i.3.'23' 
12.41 
13.22 
11.72 
12.' 76' 
14. ,57 

i-i.'si ' 

15.46 

ii.os' 

12.01 

is.'se' 

18.92 
i6.'28' 
1.5.85 

ii'eo 

15.84 
16.' 72' 
17.46 

ie.'se 

20. 65 
i7.'24 
21.94 

is.'os 

15.71 

ii'os' 



12.26 
6.00 

i2.'87 
6.65 

ii.'ii 

3.50 

ii.'87 

7.59 
i2.'42 
9.79 

ii'is 

5.99 

i4.'i.5 

9.50 
15." 74 
7.56 

ii.'di 

9.09 
20.' 49 

7.19 
i9.'64 

5.22 
2i.'i7 

6.63 
2i.'64 

7.74 
27."35 



1.13 
5.' 30 
1.81 



4.17 
4.11 



6.36 
3.22 



5.42 
5.90 



5.35 
3.42 



6.78 
3.67 



5.46 
2.43 
'4.',8i 
3.69 



6.54 
4.39 



4.70 
2.44 



5.77 
1.82 



4.34 
5.92 



5.66 
5.64 



7.78 
7.73 



8.78 
6.62 



10.09 
6.79 



10.80 
7.37 



11.61 
6.46 

is.m 



An- 
nual. 



57.59 



67.93 
61. 1.5 



69. 46 
58. 12 



79.60 
63.20 



80.06 

70. 87 



84.26 
74.98 



87.05 
74. 7,5 



87. 7S 
69.63 
'86!46 
62.02 



90.81 
88.80 



92.99 
81.51 



100. 53 
75. 85 



102.72 
95.33 



100. 15 
79.05 



105. 17 
98.47 



121. 13 
SO. 91 



122. 40 
100.39 



132.53 
100.82 



128. 48 
147. 45 
163.' 51 



NOTK.— Station averages do not include 1920 records. 



96 



THE PANAMA CANAI^. 



Table No. 2. — Maximuvi rainfall in the Canal Zone 

June SO, 1920. 



and vicinity, Oct. 1. 1905, to 





Maximum rainfall, inches. 


.stations. 


5 minutes. 


1 hour. 


24 hours.! 




Inches. 


Date. 


Inches. Date. 


Inches. 


Date. 


Balboa (June 10, 1906) 


0.90 
.64 
.50 
.60 
.75 

.60 

.59 
.60 

.62 

.67 

.64 

6 2.45 


May 12,1912 

Aug. 7,1908 

Pept. 6,1917 

Nov. 11,1908 

July 24,1908 

/July 25,1900 

\Ocl. 21,1918 

Julv 27,1908 

Julv 20.1909 

/Aug. 3,1912 

lAug. 12,1914 

June 16,1909 

Aug. 25,1909 

Nov. 29,1911 


5.86 June 2,1906 
3.98 Oct. 9,1911 
4.09 1 Sept. 6,1917 

3.46 do 

4.14 , Nov. 20,1917 

\ 4.19 Oct. 21,1918 

3.32 May 11,1911 
4.19] July 8,1915 

1 4.72 Aug. 12,1914 

4.51 1 Aug. 7,1908 
4.90 ; Oct. 8,1909 
4.53 Nov. 29,1911 


7.57 
7.23 
4.75 
5.45 
8.24 

6.15 

6.56 
8.19 

10.48 

8.85 
8.53 
10.86 


Nov. 16-17,1906 


Balhoa Heights (Oct. 1 , 1905) 2. 

Miralores (June 19, 1914) 

Pedro Miiuel (Jan. 1, 1908) 

Rio Grande (iJec. 29, 1905) 

Empire (July 18, 1906) : . 


May 1^-13, 1912 
Sept. 6,1917 
Nov. 19-20,1917 
Do. 

Dec. 3,19063 


Gamboa (Nov. 18, 1905) 

Alhajuela (Mar. 31, 1907) 

Gatun (Oct. 1, 1905) 


Dec. 2-3,1906 
Dec. 2-3,1906' 

Do. 


Bohio (Oct. 1, 1905) * 


Aug. 7-8, 1908 


Colon (Oct. 1.1905) 

Porto Bello (May 1, 1908)* 


Dec. 2-3, 1906 
Dec. 28-29,1909 



' Maximum fall in 24 consecutive hours. 

2 Formerly Ancon. Station moved to Balboa Heights Oct. 1, 1914. 

3 No a-itomatic record on this date. Total for 24 hours ending at noon. 
* Station closed January, 1912. 

5 Station closed Aug. 31, 1914, and reopened in Deccmher, 1918. 

6 Approximate. Automatic record indistinct, due to unusually excessive rate of fall. 

Note.— Dates in parenthesis opposite station names refer to installation of automatic register. 
Table No. 3. — Monthly meteorological data, year 1919, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. 





Atmospheric 




















>. 




pressure 








Air temperature (°F.) 












(inches). 




















a 

J3^ 








d 






§ 






a 




J3 










Ol 






a 






1 




<C 


S£ 




c 
_o 




> 
3} 


S 
c 


a 
p. 


oj 


y. 
as 

a 


s 

a 
•g 


oj 


a 


Bk 


^a 


- a 
s 


C 

OJ 










03 








03 


s' 




Oi 


a> 




ta 


w 


S 


S 


Pi 


S 


i 




:g 


s 


trt 


a 


January 


29,720 


29,841 


79.8 


90 


2 


87.6 


70 


6 


72.1 


19 


72.2 


77.8 


February 


29,748 


29,870 


81.4 


94 


6 


89.4 


70 


14 


73.5 


20 


72.8 


74.4 


March 


29,751 


29,872 


80.8 


92 


16 


88.9 


67 


20 


72.8 


23 


72.0 


72.9 


April 


29,708 
29,699 
29, 690 


29, 828 
29,820 
29,812 


81.6 
81.2 
80.6 


93 
92 
90 


3 
4 
3 


88.4 
86.8 
86.3 


72 
73 

72 


6 

1 
18 


74.9 
75.6 
74.9 


18 
17 
16 


75.1 
76.8 
76.0 


80.1 


May 


86.0 


June 


86.2 


July 


29,714 
29,730 


29, 834 
29,851 


80.6 
81.4 


91 
92 


14 
4 


86.8 
87.9 


71 

72 


8 
20 


74.4 
74.9 


17 
18 


75.5 
75.6 


85.6 


August 


85.1 


September... 


29,712 


29,834 


79.4 


90 


6 


8.5.1 


71 


27 


73.6 


18 


74.8 


86.9 


October 


29,708 


20. 830 


79.7 


90 


21 


8,5.8 


70 


6 


73.6 


18 


74.7 


87.1 


November . . . 


29,724 1 29, .846 


79.1 


90 


12 


86.0 


70 


14 


72.2 


18 


73.8 


84.5 


December 


29,7.34 29,&56 


79.8 


92 


8 


87.5 


68 


13 


72.1 


19 


73.0 


80.8 


Year... 


29,720 1 29,841 


80.4 


94 


86 


87.2 


67 


3 20 


73.7 


23 


74.4 


82.3 



> Elevation of barometer 118 feet above mean sea level. 



» February. 



s March. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



97 



Table No. 3. — Monthly meteorological data, year 1919, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone — 

Continued. 





Precipitat 
(inches) 


on 


Wind. 




Number of days. 












§ 
^ 


1 
S 


t^ 












g 


■a 

o 
































































>i 


tea 






















o 


B 

o 

.2^ 


& 
"a 
Pi 


a o 


o 
ir 


R. 

iS 




6 


c 

6 


3 

■to 

1- 
CS 


•a' 
o 
5 


'2 


C5 
< 


January 


0.28 


1.00 


7 


N. 


8,573 

7,867 


32 


NW. 


10 


8 


22 


1 





4.5 
4.8 
4.1 
7.2 

7 2 


February 


T. 


.80 





N. 


32 


N. 


19 


5 


23 








March 


T. 
6.43 


.65 
3.09 



15 


N. 
NW. 


10, 196 
6,537 
4,807 


36 
31 


NW. 
NW. 


7 
26 


16 



15 

18 



12 




g 


April 


May 


5.21 


>8.46 


23 


NW. 


30 


S. 


15 





20 


11 


9 


June 


8.93 


7.56 


19 


NW. 


4,521 


28 


sw. 


16 





12 


18 


15 


7 7 


July 


4.75 


7.69 


15 


NW. 


5,150 


25 


s. 


28 





16 


15 


15 


7.4 
7 


Augtist 


5.82 


7.72 


22 


NW. 


4,884 


32 


sw. 


5 





21 


10 


15 


September 


10.84 


7.89 


21 


NW. 


4,090 


22 


8. 


13 





14 


16 


15 


7.5 


October 


12.11 


10.33 


22 


NW. 


4,516 


31 


S. 


24 


1 


11 


19 


16 


7 6 


November 


4.97 


10.10 


17 


N. 


4,327 


32 


NE. 


21 


1 


19 


10 


1 


6.8 


December 


1.81 


4.17 


12 


N. 


5,622 


25 


NW. 


17 


2 


27 


2 





5.5 


Year 


61.15 


69.46 


173 


NW. 


71,090 


36 


NW. 


s7 


33 


218 


114 


94 


6.4 



' Average for 22 years' record. 



2 Tenths of sky obscured during daytime. 



Table No. 4. — Monthly meteorological data, year 1919, Colon, R. P. 



Month. 



January.. . 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. .. 

October 

November . . . 
December 

Year . . . 



Atra ospheric 

pressure 
(inches). 



29, 822 
29, 856 
29, 861 
29,810 
29,786 
29, 777 
29,804 
29,818 
29, 792 
29, 790 
29, 806 
29, 826 

29,812 



Air temperature (°F.). 



79.6 
80.1 
79.6 
80.0 
82.0 
80.7 
80.2 
80.8 
80.6 
80.1 
80.0 
80.4 

80.3 



82.5 
82.6 
82. 5 
83.1 
86.3 
85.2 
84.2 
85.1 
86.1 
85. 2 
84.6 
85.1 

84.4 



8 13 



76.7 
77.6 
76.8 
77.0 
77.6 
76.2 
76.3 
76.5 
75.2 
75.0 
75. 5 
75.8 

76.4 






74.6 
75.2 
74.4 
77.2 

77.6 
77.5 
77.2 
77.0 
76.1 
',6.4 
75. 5 
75.2 



' Elevation of barometer 36 feet above mean sea level. 

2 June. 

' December. 






80.1 
81.3 
79.4 

85.7 
85.6 
86.9 
87.0 
85.2 
84.2 
84.4 
80.6 
78.6 

83.2 



8847—20- 



98 



THE PANAMA CANAX.. 



Table No 


. A.— Monthly 


^meteorological data, year 1919, Co 


Ion, 


R.P. 


— Continued. 




Precipitation (inches). 




■Wind. 






Number of daj 


s. 












o 




Ma.Kimum ^ 


•eloc- 














o 

2 


"3 

a 


.g 


■■3 

bad 

'3 
> 


I 
11 

_a 

'3'"' 




ity. 




i 


§ 


3 


i 

■s 


1 


Month. 


u 

a. 

J 


1 
o 


a> 


"3 




o 


o 


C3 


S 


o 


•>-« 




c3 




S 




.£5 


t» 




a 


iz; 


« 


Ph 


H 


a 


P 


<=> 


o 


PL| 


O 


^ 


< 


January 


1.82 


3.81 


20 


N. 


11,. 3.59 


32 


N. 


12 


3 


20 


8 





5.8 


Fehriiarv 


.36 


1.65 


10 


N. 


9,526 


28 


N. 


27 


•3 


15 


10 





6.5 


March 


.61 
10.95 

6.95 
12.08 
13.60 

6.77 


1.59 
4.35 
12.60 
13.35 
15.97 
14.83 


13 
23 
18 
24 

28 
22 


N. 
N. 
SE. 
N. 
W. 
W. 


11,828 
8,839 
5,908 
4,7.52 
6, 620 
6, 823 


28 
27 
27 
24 
32 
28 


NE. 

W. 
NE. 

E. 

N. 
S. 


18 
26! 
23 
4 1 
14 1 
21 


5 
1 






15 
7 
8 
5 
4 

10 


11 
22 
23 
25 
27 
21 



6 
16 
14 
18 
7 


6.3 


April 


8.3 




8.4 




8.7 


Jiilv 


8.8 


Auijiist..' 


8.2 


September 


11.74 


12.65 


20 


SK. 


4,928 


27 


N. 


7 


1 


13 


16 


8 


7.7 


October 


21.94 


15.03 


26 


SE. 


5,822 


30 


W. 


22 


1 


12 


18 


14 


8.0 


November 


6.63 


21. 04 


22 


N. 


7,197 


33 


N. 


28 ' 


2 


15 


13 


3 


6.9 


December 


7.37 


11.61 


23 


NE. 


9,778 


30 


NE. 


30, 


6 


20 


5 





5.8 


Year 


100. 82 


128.48 


249 


N. 


93,380 


33 


N. 


3 28 


22 


144 


199 


86 


7.4 



1 Average for 49 years record. ^ Tenths of sky obscured during daytime. ^ November. 

Table No. 5. — Monthly evaporation in Canal Zone, years 1919 and 1920. 
[\'alues in inches.] 





Balboa Heights. 


Gatun. 


Colon.! 


Month. 


1919 


1920 


Average 
12 years. 


1919 


1920 


Average 
9 5'ears. 


1919 


Average 
11 years. 




7.970 
7.704 
9.813 
5.478 
3.737 
3.063 
3.228 
3.838 
2.807 
2.881 
3.979 
5.275 


8.330 
8.380 
9.531 
6. 548 
6.121 
3.379 


6.005 
6.393 
7.652 
5.445 
3. 536 
2.994 
3.260 
3.251 
3. 163 
3.276 
3.146 
4.694 


5. 874 
5.876 
7.253 
4.625 
5.359 
4.110 
3.842 
4.709 
4.592 
3.863 
4.677 
4.868 


6.798 
6.756 
6.920 
7.2.57 
6.247 
4.248 


5.970 
6.248 
7.481 
6.404 
5.127 
4.250 
4.407 
4.426 
4.474 
4.160 
3.783 
4.970 


5.476 
6.230 
9.020 
6.156 
5.079 
3.721 
3. 060 
3.840 
3. 376 
3.431 
4.374 
5.399 


6.055 




6.322 




7.362 


April 


6.003 


May 


3.961 




3.273 


July 


3.111 









3.176 








3.190 








3.292 








3.135 








4.521 










Year 


59. 773 




52. 815 


59.648 




61. 700 


59. 162 


53.401 











' Evaporation records discontinued Jan. 1, 1920. 
Note.— Averages do not include the year 1920. 



HYDROGRAPHY. 



The same hydrographic stations were operated as last year. 

Tidal conditions. — Automatic tide registers were continued in operation at Balboa 
and Colon. The tidal extremes of record for the calendar year 1919 at these stations 
are given in the following table: 



station. 


Maximum high water. 


Extreme low water. 


Maximum range.i 


Minimum range. 


Feet- 


Date. 


Feet- 


Date. 


Feet. 


Date. 


Feet. 


Date. 




10.6 
1.70 


/Sept. 13 

\Oct. 11-12... 

Dec. 8 


1 -10.9 
-.71 


Apr. 2... 
June 4... 


20.7 
1.83 


Apr. 2... 

/Jan. 12.. 
\Dec. 8... 


6.2 
} 2.20 


/Jan. 26. 

\Feb. 25. 

Several 

dates. 


Colon 





> For consecutive tides. 



' One or more phases of a tide are often absent at Colon. 



EEPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 99 

Elevations referred to zero of gage rods, approximately mean sea level. 

Monthly tide data at Balboa and Colon for the calendar year 1919 are presented in 
Table No. 6. 

Chagres River. — The outstanding feature of the Chagres River discharge was the low 
yield of the watershed. The 18 months' period, December, 191S-June 1, 1920, showed 
the lov'cst >ield of any 18 months' period since January, 1905-July 1, 1906, the pre- 
vious low record since 1902, thedateof beginning of careful, continuousgagings. Inas- 
much as the Chagres River usually furnishes about 40 per cent of Gatun Lake's annual 
total yield, it is apparent that the water supply of Gatun Lake was affected by this 
deficit in 1919. 

The three lowest periods of 18 months' discharge of record in order of minimum 
flow are: Discharge in 

Period. cubic foot-seconds. 

1. Jan. 1, 1905, to Julvl, 1906 1,286 

2. Dec. 1, 1918, to June 1, 1920 1,502 

3. Jan. 1, 1911, to July 1, 1912 _ 1,738 

In order of minimum flow for 12 months the order is: 

1. Jan. 1, 1905, to Jan. 1, 1906 1,518 

2. Jan. 1, 1919, to Jan. 1, 1920 1,886 

3. Jan. 1, 1912, to Jan. 1, 1913 2,103 

April, 1920, was the month of minimum average flow of record, 304 cubic foot- 
seconds in comparison with the previous minimum of 371 cubic foot-seconds in 
April, 1912. 

The mean discharge of the Chagres River at Alhajuela for the calendar year 1919 was 
1,886 cubic foot-seconds, or 28 per cent below normal, against an 18-year average of 2,616 
cubic foot-seconds. The Chagres River furnished 36 per cent of the Gatim Lake total 
yield. The maximum monthly discharge at Alhajuela was 2,996 cubic foot-seconds 
in September, and the minimum monthly discharge was 469 cubic foot-seconds in 
March. (See Table 8 and Plates Nos. 14 and 15 for data on discharge by months.) 
The maximum momentary discharge at Alhajuela diu-ing the calendar year 1919 was 
23,800 cubic foot-seconds at elevation 101.3 during the flood of November 5, 1919, and 
the minimum momentary discharge was 333 cubic foot-seconds on March 24, 25, and 
26, 1919. On May 11, 1920, the minimum momentary discharge was 231 cubic foot- 
seconds, the lowest of record. 

Freshets. — There were nine freshets in the Chagres River during the calendar year 
1919, with a rise of 5 feet or more at Alhajuela, occurring during the period from April 
15 to November 5. Data on the principal freshets for the calendar year 1919 and 
January 1 to July 1, 1920, are given in Table No. 7. 

Flood tvarnings. — Vigia, Alhajuela, and Gatuncillo were continued as flood-warning 
stations. Timely warnings of all large freshets were issued to the Chagres River plan- 
tation management, the port captains, and other interests affected by flood conditions. 

Current-7neter gagings. — Fifty-four gagings were made at the Calle Larga gaging sta- 
tion (Chagres River) during the calendar year 1919, covering a range from elevation 
96.20 to 107.40. Nine current-meter gagings were made during the year on each of 
the upper tributaries, the Pequeni, the Chagres, and the La Puente. 

Gatun Lake. — The Gatun Lake watershed total jdeld for the calendar year 1919 was 17 
per cent below normal, amounting to 5,225 cubic foot-seconds, against a nine-year aver- 
age of 6,267 cubic foot-seconds. (See Tables 9 and 10, respectively, for monthly hydrol- 
ogy for Gatun Lake and Gatim Lake watershed for 1919.) The maximum monthly 
total yield was 10,531 cubic foot-seconds in October. The minimum monthly 
total jdeld was 952 cubic foot-seconds in March. The total yield of the watershed 

amoimted to 164.78 billion cubic feet, accounted for as follows: „.„. ^. , ^ 

Billion cubic feet. 

Run-off above Alhajuela (36 per cent) 59. 45 

Yield from land area below Alhajuela (44 per cent) 71. 86 

Direct rainfall on lake surface (20 per cent) 33. 47 

Total (100 per cent) 164. 78 

The uses and disposition of this water supply were: Billion cubic feet. 

Evaporation from lake surface (14 per cent) 22. 108 

Gat'in Lake lockages (11 per cent) 18. 246 

Hydroelectric power (28 per cent) 46. 340 

Spillway discharge (46 per cent) 76. 044 

Leakage and miscellaneous uses (1 per cent) 1. 819 

Increased storage 230 

Total (100 per cent) 164. 787 

See plates Nos. 16, 17, 18, and 19 for graphical data. 



100 THE PANAMA CAXAL. 

With no inflov. the varioiis rses and losses during the calendar year 1910 would 
have lowered (>at\in Lake as tollows: 

Canal lockaires. irom elevation 87 to elevation S;^. 

Hydroelectric power from elevation 87 to elevation 7(i.o. 

Spillway waste, from elevation 87 to elevation 68.8. 

EA^aporation. from elevation 87 to elevation 8'2.2. 

Total losses, from elevation 87 to elevation 4l.fi. 
Wi'h no Josses from Gatun Lake the various sources of inflow would have raised 
the lake as follows: 

Pirect rainfall on lake S'orface. from elevation 79.7 to elevation 87. 

R\in-off from land surface, from ele^"ation 51.2 to elevation 87. 

Total net yield, from elevation 40 to elevation 87. 
The total net >-ield was equal to 81 per cent of the capacity of Gatun Lake. 
Storage (kpktion. 1930 dry seaso7i. Gatun Lair. — The 1920 dn,- season began about 
December 16, 1919. and the dry-season weather continued to May 13. 1920. being 
the worst season for water supply since American occupation in 1904. Inflow of 
average seasonal amounts did not begin until June 1 . Plate No. 19 graphically shows 
a study of how the Gat>in Lake was affected, with comparisons with other yeare. 

In order to conserve water supply, about 50 per cent of the usual output at the 
hydroelectric plant was generated at the MiraHores plant, from March 3 to June 3. 
1920. The ratio of water expended in making hydroelectric power and lockages in 
the calendar year 1919 was 2.54 to 1; in 1920 dry season. 1.87 to 1. There were 20.46 
billion cubic feet of storage depletion between January 1 and May 28. 1920. the lake 
falling to elevation 81.77. Had the hydroelectric plant continued at its usual rate 
of water consumption throughout the 1920 dry season, the Gatun Lake would have 
fallen to elevation SO. 55. which allows a depth of water in Gaillard Cut of 40.55 feet. 
It is apparent from my study and curves, published in the 1918 anniial report, that 
when the Gatun hydroelectric plant has reached its complete development, at least 
a partial switch of power generation to the Miraflores plant will have to be made 
during many future dry seasons. 

Branch H-i-DEOGRAPHic Office, Cristobal. 

The branch hydrographic ofhce. under the port captain's office at Cristobal, is 
operated in connection with the Cristobal meteorological station. Corrections of 
navigational charts, barometers, and chronometers were made. Value of charts, 
books, and other aids to na^•igation sold or issued for official use during the fiscal year 
of 1919-20 amounted to $3,668.20. an increase of 35 per cent over the pre\'ious fiscal 
year. There was an average of eight ship's chronometers being checked daily for 
time corrections tliroughout the year. 

Special Ixtestigatioxs. 

Special reports were made to yoii on str.dies or investigations during the year as 
below: 

1. Mean tide levels — Balboa and Cristobal. 

2. Comparative tide records — Balboa and Taboga. 

3. Surges in Gaillard Ciit from lockages at Pedro Miguel. 

4. Miraflores Lake currents affecting navigation. 
A summary of the latter report is as follows: 

(a) The general drift of the oiirrents due to lockages, spillway operations, and dry season prevailing 
winds is toward Miraflores locks. Southbound ships will experience more difficulty in na%-igating Mira- 
flores Lake than will northbound vessels. 

(b) Northbound vessels in cither chamber of Miraflores locks should experience no important navi- 
gating difficulties on account of spillway gate No. 8 operating at ,5.2-foot opening. 

(f) It is not definitely kno\\'n whether or not southboimd vessels can safely enter Miraflores locks with 
spillway gate No. S discharging through a 5.2-foot opening. It is suggested that careful tests be made to 
<^t ermine this. 

((f) Prevailing northwesterly winds and lockage surges cause currents in Miraflores lock west foreba^ 
to set up toward the lock gates, followed by a back surge when the current strikes the lock gates. This 
back surge sometimes catches the bow of ah incoming vessel, deflecting its course toward the west wing 
wall. Neither the time nor the magnitude of this back surge can be predicted. Jfaking fast the bow 
center wall to\\ing line as soon as possible after the vessel comes alongside is suggested as a precautionary 
measure to prevent this deflecting tendency. 

The following tables and plates accompany the hydrographic section of this report : 
Table No. 6. Tidal conditions, calendar year 1919. 

Table No. 7. Principal freshets in the Cliagrcs River, calendar year 1919 and Janu- 
arv to June, inclusive. 1920. 

Table No. 8. Monthly discharire. Chagres River at Alhajuela. 1919. 
Table No. 9. Monthly hydrology. Gatun Lake. 1919. 
Table No. 10. Hvdrologj' of Gatun Lake watershed. 1919. 
Table No. 11. Hydrology of Miraflores Lake watershed. 1919. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



101 



Plate 14. Chagres River drainage basin; mean monthly discharge at Alhajuela; 
year 1919, dry season 1920, and 18-year average. 

Plate 15. Chagres River drainage basin: massed curves-discharge at Alhajuela; 
maximum, minimum, current and average years. 

Plate 16. Operating uses of Gatun Lake water supply; year 1919, dry season 1920. 

Plate 17. Gatun Lake watershed; j-ields and losses: massed curves, year 1920. 

Plate 18. Gatun Lake watershed; total \-ields; year 1919, dry season 1920 and 9-year 
average. 

Plate 19. Gatun Lake watershed; comparative dry se\3on hydrographs and curves; 
monthly uses and losses, dry seasons 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920. 

Table No. 6. — Tidal conditions, calendar year 1919. 

(Elevations in feet referred to 7ero of rod. approximately mean sea level.] 

PACIFIC COAST— BALBOA CAXAI. ZONE. 



Mfnth. 


Maxi- 
mum 
high 
water. 


Date. 


Ex- 
treme 

low 
water. 


Date. 


Maxi- 
mum 

ran.tje. 


Mini- 
Date, m'.im Date, 
range. 


Avcr- 

are 

daily 

ran.:e. 


Monthly 
moan 
tide 
level. 


January 

February . . . 

March 

April 

Mav .... 


8.3 
9.1 
9.8 
9.9 
10.3 
9.5 
9.1 
9.5 
10.6 
10.6 
10.6 
10.2 


18 

4 

5 

30 

1 

29 

28 

1.5 

13 

11-12 

9 

9 


- 9.1 

- 9.3 
-10.2 
-10.9 
-10.3 

- 9.1 

- 8.8 

- 8.1 

- 8.6 

- 9.9 

- 9.7 

- 9.7 


18 

3 

4 

2 

1 

29 

?8 

26 

12-13 

11 

9 

9 


17.4 
18.3 
19.8 
20.7 
20.6 
18.8 
17.9 
17.4 
19.2 
20.5 

ro.3 

19.9 


18 

3-4 

4 

2 

1 

1 

1-28 

15 

13 

11 

9 

9 


6.2 • rs 

6.2 ; 25 
6.7 ! ?6 
7.4 1 ?4 

9.2 1 10-23 

8.3 1 9 
6.9 ' 8 

6.4 1 6 
6.3 ! 5 
6.6 I 4 

7.3 i 2 

8.4 2 


12.6 
12.8 
13.1 
13.3 
13.1 
12.9 
13.0 
13.0 
12.9 
1?.7 
12.7 
li\8 


-(-0.452 
+ .206 
-1- .114 
+ .322 
+ .738 


Jime 

Julv . . . 


+ .817 
-f- .833 


Auiiust 

September.. 

October 

N ovember . . 
DeccmVier. . . 


->r .928 
-i- .994 
-1-1.054 
-f- .9W 
-h .915 


Year . . 


10.6 


(Sept. 13 
^Oct. 10-11 
(Nov. 9 


[-10.9 .\pr. 2 

' i 


ro. 7 


Apr. 2 6.2 {^-; -^ 


1 12.9 -1- .694 

! 



ATLANTIC COAST— CRI.^TOBAL. CANAL ZONE. 



January 


1.53 


1.3 


-0.51 


1 


1.83 


12 0.21 


24-:fi 


0.89 


-r 0.250 


Febniarv. .. 


.87 


1 


- .79 


8 ! 


1.46 


10 .20 


22-?7 


.70 


-1- .054 


March 


.97 


10 


- .53 


8 j 


1.47 i 


10 .23 


17-:5 


.69 


+ .150 


April 


1.23 


29 


- .54 


5 1 


1.48 ! 


5 1 .22 


2-13 


.78 


-!- .270 


May 


1.36 
1.26 


2 

24 


- .65 

- .71 


30-31 1 

4 I 


1.76 j 
L73 1 


29 1 .20 
91 . .24 


2 
1-18 


.96 
.97 


-!- .220 


June 


-^ .205 


Julv 


1.18 


25 


- .46 


2-12-23 1 


1.58 1 


26 


.21 


20 


.85 


+ .220 


.Vui'U'^t 


1.23 


19 


- .32 


6 


1.46 ! 


20 


.21 


4 


.75 


+ .284 


September.. 


1.28 


17 


- .38 


17 


1.60 


18 


.20 


28 


.69 


4- .257 


October 


1.44 


15 


- .47 


31 


1.63 


16 


.20 


10-13 


.81 


-f .417 


November .. 


1.34 


21 


- .56 


2 


1.69 1 


9 


.23 


8 


.86 


4- .386 


December. . . 


1.70 


8 


- .54 


23 


1.83 1 


8 


.22 


9 


.90 


+ .342 


Year.. 


1.70 


Dec. 8 


- .71 


June 4 


^•^3 ft-; 


■I '} •« 


/Several 
\ dates. 


\ .82 


-(- .255 



10: 



THE PAN^AiMA CANAL 



Table No. 7. — Principal freshets in the Chagres River for the calendar year 1919 and 
January to June, inclusive, 1920. 

[Elevations are in feet above mean sea level.] 





Vigia. I .Mhajuela. 


Galuncillo. 


I>ate. 


Eleva- 
tion of 
crest 

(feetV 


Rise 

(feet). 


Eleva- 
tion of 1 Rise 
crest i (feet"), 
(feet). 


Hours 
after 
Vigia. 


Maxi- 
mum 

dis- 
charge. 
(c.f..s.). 


Eleva- 
tirn of 
crest 
(feet). 


Rise 
(feet). 


Hours 
after 
Vigia. 


Per 
cent of 
Vigia. 

rise. 


Per 

cenl of 
Alha- 
juela 
rise. 


1919. 

Apr. 15 

Apr. 23 

May 9-10... 
May 13-1 1 . . 
May 23-24 . . 

June 30 

Aus;. 17-18.. 

Sept. 2! 

Nov. 5 

1920. 

June 2 

Tune 21 

June 25 


13S.30 
1.35.80 
1.33.00 
136. 20 
135.55 
133. 40 
134.30 
133.80 
137.95 

136. 85 
133.95 
141.85 


11.2 
9.3 
6.4 
9.2 
8.4 
6.4 
7.4 
6.3 

10.4 

10.8 

7.1 

15.2 


100.70 
9S.90 
96.90 
99.35 
98.90 
97.50 
98.00 
97. SO 

101.30 

99.82 
97.90 
103.20 


8.9 
7.4 
5.» 
7.5 
6.9 
5.6 
6.2 
5.6 
9.0 

8.9 
6.2 
11.7 


U 
H 
1-V 
li 
U 
1-} 
H 

IJ 
2 

H 
li 


21 , 200 
15, 750 
10, 150 
17,210 
15,750 
11,790 
13,120 
12,600 
23, 100 

18,520. 
12,900 
29,500 


80.72 
88.20 
87.18 
88.80 
(^) 

88.18 
87.90 
88.05 
90.90 

88. 45 
87.47 
91.29 


5.7 
3.8 
2.1 
3.G 
(') 
3.0 
2.5 
2.6 
4.0 

6.4 
4.8 
8.6 


n 
n 
u 
li 

(1) 
(?) 

P 

2i 
(?) 
2J 


51 
41 
33 
39 
(') 
47 
34 
41 
38 

59 
68 
57 


64 
51 
39 

48 

(') 
54 
40 
46 
44 

72 
77 
74 



1 Record lost. 



Table No. 8. — Monthly discharge, Chagres River, at Alhajuela, calendar year 1919. 
[Drainage area, 427 square miles.] 



Month. 


Discharge in second-feet . 


Inches on 
watersheds. 


Per 
cent 
rim-ofl 
to rain- 
fall. 


Maxi- 
mum. 


Date. 


Mini- 
mum. 


Date. 


Mean. 


Rain- 
fall. 


Run- 
off. 


January 


4,990 
986 
711 
21,200 
17,100 
11,790 

9,260 
13,120 
12,. 560 

9,375 
23, 100 
10, 000 


12 
13 

12-13 
15 
14 
30 
21 
18 

20-21 
11 
5 
5 


898 

521 

333 

375 

1,140 

1,239 

1,151 

1,217 

1,783 

1,613 

1,503 

1,320 


28-29 

28 

24-26 

8 

9 

21 

17 

5 

18 

30-31 

18 

31 


1,285 
731 

469 
1,581 
2,348 
1,887 
2,060 
2,049 
2,996 
2,512 
2,455 
2,186 


1.99 
.59 
.48 
16.06 
9.43 
8.72 
16.71 
13.60 
14.10 
13.92 
9.15 
4.06 


3.47 
1.78 
1.27 
4.13 
6.34 
4.93 
5.56 
5.53 
7.83 
6.78 
6.42 
5.90 


174 




302 




265 


April 


26 


May 


67 


Jime 


57 


July 


33 




41 


September 


56 


October 


49 


November 


70 




145 






Year 


23, 100 
170,000 


Nov. 5 

Dec. 26,1909 


333 

250 


Mar. 24-26.... 
Apr. 20,1912 


1,885 
2,616 


108.81 
120.42 


59.94 
83.21 


55 


18 years 


69 







REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 



103 



Table No. 9. — Monthly hydrology, Gatun Lake, calendar year 1919. 
[Drainage area, 1,320 square miles.] 



Month. 



Mean 
elevation 

above 

mean 
sea level 

(feet). 



Operative 
and 
useful 
losses 

(c.f.s.) 



Spillway 
discharge 

waste 
(c.f.s.). 



Storage: 
+ in- 
crease, 
-de- 
crease 
(c.f.s.). 



Evapo- 
ration 
from 
lake 
surface 
(c. f. s.). 



Net 

yield, 

3+4±5 

(c.f.s.). 



Total 

vield, 

6+7 

(c.f.s.). 



January.., 
February. , 

March 

April 

May 

June 

JiUy 

August 

September 
October. . . 
November. 
December. 

Year 



86.75 
86.05 
84.85 
84.15 
85.10 
85.10 
85.12 
85.12 
85.22 
86.03 
86.81 
86.99 



2,023 
2,004 
2,093 
2,052 
2,055 
2,083 
2,110 
2,149 
2,102 
2,139 
2,098 
2,348 



3 



8 
26 
2,053 
2,025 
2,. 584 
2,377 
5,807 
6,436 
4,547 
2,927 



- 485 
-1,930 
-2, 1.51 
+ 1,173 



224 
+ 417 

- 52 

- 90 
+ 471 
+1,419 
+ 1,350 

- 336 



819 
910 
1,002 
647 
737 
590 
524 
647 
647 
536 
678 
687 



85.61 



2,106 



2,411 + 



701 



1,541 
73 
-50 
3,250 
4,332 
4,525 
4,641 
4,437 
8,379 
9,994 
7,995 
4,939 



4,524 



2,360 

984 

952 

3,897 

5,069 

5,115 

5,166 

5,084 

9,027 

10,531 

8, 673 

5,626 



5,225 



Table No. 10. — Hydrology of Gatun Lake watershed, calendar year 1919. 

[Drainage area, 1,320 square miles.] 

Gatun lockages 2, 300 

Pedro Miguel lockages 2, 637 



Gatun Lake. 




Date. 



Monthly mean 
Maximum ... 
Minimum 



Dec. 3 
Apr. 12 



Gatun spillway, waste 

Gatun spillway, leakage 

Gatun locks, lockages and tests 

Gatun locks, leakage 

Gatun hydroelectric plant 

Pedro Miguel locks, lockages and tests ' 

Pedro Miguel locks, leakage > 

Maintaining Miraflores Lake through Pedro Miguel locks 

Pumping at Gamboa 

Brazos Brook reservoir 

(a) Total outflow 

(6) Storage Cplus increase, minus decrease) 

(c) Net yield (a plus 6) 

(d) Evaporation (57.738 inches) 

(e) Total yield (c plus d) 

(/) Rainfall on lake (87.42 inches) 

(<;) Yield from land area (e minus/) 

Transferred into Miraflores Lake i 



Quantities. 



Million 
cubic feet. 



76, 044. 4 

115.6 

9, .535. 4 

226.1 

46, 340. 2 

8, 710. 6 

.329.3 

307.2 

498.8 

341.5 

142,449.1 

+2.30. 

142, 679. 1 

22,107.9 

164,787.0 

33,467.6 

131,319.5 

9, 347. 1 



Second- 
feet. 



2,411.4 

.3.7 

302.4 

7.2 

1, 469. 4 

276.2 

10.4 

9.7 

15.8 

10.8 

4,517.0 

+ 7.3 

4, 524. 3 

701. 

5, 225. 4 

1,061.2 

4, 164. 1 

296.4 





Mean area 
(square 
miles). 


Rainfall 
(inches). 


Run-off 
(inches). 


Percentage 
run-oflf. 


Lake surface 


165 
1,155 
1,320 


87.42 
95.27 
94.37 


87.42 
48.94 
53.73 


100 




61 


Total watershed 


57 







' Transferred into Miraflores Lake. 



104 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 11. — Hydrology of Miraf.orcs Lake watershed, calendar year 1919. 

[Drainage area, 38.5 square miles.] 

Miraflores lockages 2, 463 

Miraflores Lake. 

Monthly mean 

Maximum 

Minimum : 




Quantities. 



Million 
cubic feet. 



Second- 
feet. 



Miraflores spillway, waste 

Miraflores spillway, leakage 

Miraflores locks, lockages and tests 

Miraflores locks, leakage 

Miraflores power plant cooling water 

Miraflores locks, lake regulation 

(a) Total outflow 

(6) Total inflow from Gatun Lake i 

(c) Storage (plus increase, minus decrease) 

(d) Net yield (a minus b minus c) 

(c) Evajioration on lake (53.461 inches) 

(/) Total vield <d plus e) 

(g) Rainfall on lake ( 60.66 inches) 

(h) Yield from land area (/minus (?) 

Includes filtration plant wash water ' 



2, 803. 6 

31.5 

7, 701. 6 

216.3 

788.4 

14.0 

11, 555. 4 

9,361.4 

-1.9 

2, 192. 1 

198.7 

2,390.8 

225.5 

2,164.3 

14.3 



1.0 

244.2 

6.9 

25.0 

.4 

366.4 

2%. 8 

-.1 

69.5 

6.3 

75.8 

7.1 

68. 7 

.4 





Mean area 
(square 
miles). 


Rainfall 
(inches). 


Run-off 

(inches). 


Percentage 
run-off. 




1.6 
36.9 
38.5 


60.66 
67.00 
66.74 


60.66 
25.25 
26.73 


100 


Land area 


38 


Total watershed 


40 









' Includes filtration plant wash water. 

Section of Surveys. 

The section of surveys has continued to attend to all Panama 
Railroad land and lot surveys and has maintained the established 
Canal Zone monuments, triangulation stations, and bench marks. 
The section has also made surveys and prepared maps for the various 
departments and divisions of the Canal, for the Army and Navy, 
and for the joint land commission. Attention has been given to the 
various features of the Canal requiring precise observation. 

The report of the acting assistant engineer gives the detail of the 
work accomplished : 

Section op Surveys. 

F. R. Fitch, Acting Assistant Engineer. 

The following report of work done by the section of surveys during the fiscal year 
1919-20 is submitted herewith: 

BUILDING LOTS. 

Colon. — Corner and grade stakes were set on 43 lots in the city of Colon. Blocks 
20, 26, and 27 of the new layout were monumented. 

Cristobal. — (corner and grade stakes were set on one lot in Cristobal. 

Panama. — C'orner and grade stakes were set on one-third of lots 2 and 3, block 23, 
Santa Cruz district; three 4-foot offset monuments were also set in this block. 



BEPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 105 

MAINTENANCE RECORDS. 

Gatun Dam. — ^Y-level readings were taken on the settlement hubs once a month 
to January, 1920, and since then quarterly readings have been taken. The settle- 
ment for the year has been normal. The readings on the lateral thrust line across 
the bed of the old French Canal were discontinued. This line was established in 
May, 1919, and read continuously for four months Avithout detecting any movement. 

South ojjproach wall. — Precise level readings were taken on the permanent points 
on both sides of the wall twice a month to January, 1920, and since then once a month . 
The average settlement for the total length of the wall on the west side was 0.11 of a 
foot and on the east side 0.12 of a foot. The corresponding average for the two previous 
years was 0.14 of a foot. 

The maximum settlement has always occurred on the south half of the wall, and 
the average settlement in this section for the year was 0.135 of a foot on the west side 
and 0.143 of a foot on the east side. The corresponding average for the previous 
year was 0.17 of a foot. 

Cano Saddle. — Y-level readings taken over the settlement hubs on Cano Saddle 
showed very slight settlement, being an average of only 0.05 of a foot for the period 
January, 1919, to January, 1920. 

Cristobal coal dock. — Readings were taken on the walls once a month to determine 
the spread, if anA^ A very slight spread was found on the north end between sta- 
tions 1+ 33.5 and 4+33.5. 

CANAL ZONE BOUNDARY. 

Clearing. — The entire 5-mile limit line on the east side of the Canal was cleared 
and marked with 168 extra monuments. All monuments were stamped with their 
proper number. 

The 5-mile limit line on the west side of the Canal was also cleared and marked 
with 10 extra monuments between regular monuments 191 and 195 or to Panama Bay. 

All debris was throAMa to one side and the line cleaned to the ground, making an 
excellent trail, with the idea of its use by the natives, thereby keeping the line open. 
_ Ties were made between the boundary line and the following triangulation sta- 
tions: Cabra, Venado, Real, Iron, Lindero, Salud, Chilibre, and Army stations Nos. 
206 and S2. 

TRIANGULATION. 

New stations.— A new triangulation station, Cameron, was established to tie in the 
monuments on Fort Clayton military reservation. 

Four new stations, Guayacan, Teeple, Tumba Vieja, and Pequeni, were established 
in the vicinity of the Upper Chagies and Pequeni Rivers as a network on which to 
hang the survey of Alhajuela Basin. 

ALHAJUELA BASIN. 

Authority was granted to make a sur\'ey of Alhajuela Basin for the purpose of 
determining amount of storage possible with a dam just above Alhajuela. 

During the last dry season, in preparation for this survey, a triangulation net was 
established on the Boqueron, Pequeni, and Upper Chagres Rivers. 

Y-level elevations were carried up to the junction of the Chagres and Pequeni 
from a bench mark at Limon. The elevation of the Limon bench was determined 
by simultaneous readings on the lake surface at Limon, Rio Hondo, Rio Palenque, 
and Gamboa. A precise level line Mas rim connecting the benches at Limon, Rio 
Hondo, and Rio Palenque, and the readings at Gamboa were referred to the P. B. M. 
datiun plane. It is proposed to complete the survey proper during the next dry 
season. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Pastures. — All present and proposed fence lines of Farfan pasture were traversed. 

A line to form the northern boundary of a new pasture at Mandingo was run from 
the northwest comer of present pasture to the Canal Zone boundary line. 

A line was run to form the eastern boundary of a new pasture at Bohio. 

A reconnoissance of about 8 miles was made between Caimito and Bohio Penin- 
sula to determine new areas for clearing. 

Maps and areas of Bohio Peninsula and eight plantations were furnished the super- 
intendent of cattle industry. 



106 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Gatun swamp. — A surx'ey was made of this swamp for the purpose of locating a 
ditch for drainage. 

A map was prepared on a scale of 1-2000 showing 1 foot contours over the entire 
area, the locations of streams, hills, the tree line, the 6-inch water-pipe line to Tero 
Point, the French Canal, dredging basin and the Mindi Levee. Blue prints were 
furnished the chief health officer. 

ELECTRICAL DIVISION. 

Duct lines. — ^The work of checking up the duct-line maps in the Cristobal district 
was completed. 

The same work in the Balboa district has been started and is being done as requested 
by the electrical engineer. 

Cnhle line. — A survey was made for a cable line from the duct line at Balboa round- 
house to the new cable office at East Balboa. 

Hydroelectric station, Gatun. — Two points adjacent to unit No. 3 and two points 
in the south tailrace were set by precise IcA^els. 

LAND OFFICE. 

Las Esplanadas. — ^A new projective was made for a map of this section. 

The map was plotted up in accordance with the notes of the new survey which was 
tied in to the Panama-Ancon-Balboa survey. 

Miller's Claim.— A survey was made of Miller's Claim on the Rio Agua Salud, a 
map drawn up, and blue prints furnished the special attorney. 

La Iseca Estate. — A map of this estate was prepared in accordance with the claim- 
ant's description of the calls to show the absurd lines of his claim. 

Testimony was given in the case before the Joint Land Commission bearing on a 
map of the adjacent estate of Santa Cruz. 

Cansaloma and Waterloo. — A map was prepared showing the boundary lines and 
area of this estate. 

Playa de Flor Land Development Company and Villalobos Claims. — A survey was 
made of these claims which are situated in the vicinity of Toro Point. In connec- 
tion with the survey, the Quebrada Pescaderitos and the trail from Playa de Flor to 
the mouth of the Rio Arenal was traversed. The entire coast line was located from 
Toro Point to Nispero and a survey was made of the tract of land claimed by the 
Panama Railroad at Punta Limon. The location of the Quebrada Petitpie was also 
definitely fixed. 

FORTIFICATION DIVISION. 

Military reservations. — The boundary lines were established and monumented 
and descriptions by metes and bounds furnished the district engineer of the following- 
named military reservations: Fort Clayton at Miraflores and Corozal, Fort William D. 
DaAJs at Gatun, Fort Randolph at Margarita Point, and 200-Foot Hill at Las Minas 
Bay. 

Taboga Island. — A survey was made on Taboga Island under the instructions of 
the assistant engineer, fortification division. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT. 

Coco Solo naval reservation. — In connection with the survey and monumenting 
of the Fort Randolph military reservation, monuments A, B, and C of the naval 
reservation were reset on the actual boundary in accordance with the views of the 
special attorney, and a new description by metes and bounds was written up for this 
reservation. 

Coco Solo radio station. — The coordinates of this station were computed and azi- 
muths determined to Guantanamo, Cuba, and Key West, Fla. 

La Palma radio station.- — A survey was made establishing the boundary lines of 
the La Palma radio station on Stanley Island in San Miguel Bay. 

True azimuth was determined by solar observation. 

Puerto Ohaldia radio station. — The boundary of this reservation was run out and 
monumented, the towers, buildings, etc., located, from which data a map will be 
made and furnished the Xavy Department. OhserA'ations for azimuth and position 
were to be made, but owing to the cloudy weather nothing could be accomplished. 

Balboa radio station. — An azimuth line was laid off on the ground at Balboa radio 
station on the computed azimuth Balboa-New Orleans. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE. 107 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Panama- Anron-Balhoa map. — All corrections and additions were made on this 
map. 

Panama- Ancon-Balhoa extension. — The extension of this survev, covering the section 
between Balboa Railroad station and Diablo was completed. 

Colon- Cristobal survei/. — The maps for this survey were completed. 

Bench ynarks. — It is proposed to compile a new bench-mark book, since many of 
the present reported bench marks are destroyed and covered by the waters of Gatun 
Lake. To this end all bench marks from Colon to Gatun, inclusive, have been gone 
over and new descriptions written up. 

Precise level bench mark No. 39 at Pedro Miguel was trauvsferred to allow grading 
of a hill on which it was located. 

Work was begun repairing the precise level bench marks which extend from Colon 
to Palboa. 

Balboa shops. — Precise levels were run over the crane rails in building No. 4 at 
Balboa shops and profile of same made and furnished the superintendent of the 
mechanical division. 

Gatun dam. — The approximate areas of grass cut oyer on Gatun dam were deter- 
mined and data furnished the foreman of dams and back fills. 

Transmission tower 45-1 ■ — Relocating and grade stakes were set for this tower. 

Reco7^naissance. — A reconnaissance trip was made and reported from Nombre de 
Dios to Gamboa. \ia Rios Nombre de Dios, Boqueron, Pequeni, and Chagres. 

The East Ridge trail was covered 30 miles from Camp Young on Gatun Lake to 
Army station No. 8, which is about 6 miles from Cerro Bruja. From this point a 
cross country reconnaissance was made to Porto Bello via the mouth of the Rio 
Guanche. 

New Chagres.— An investigation of the water supply shortage at the new village 
of Chagres was made and separate report made to the engineer of maintenance. 

Trails. — Main trails were traversed as follows: Porto Bello, from where it crosses 
the Canal Zone boundary at monument No. 87 to the north line of the Fort Clayton 
military reservation; Macambo, from where it leaves the Canal Zone at boundary 
monument No. 80 on the Rio Cardenas to its junction with the Porto Bello trail to 
the south. 

Miraflores trail cleared from the main highway across the Rio Caimitillo to the 
Macambo trail opposite boundary monument No. 81. 

The clearing of IMiraflores trail was finished from opposite triangulation station 
Caimitillo to triangulation station Iron. 

The traverse of the Macambo-Agua Buena trail was continued from Canal Zone 
monument No. 80 on the Rio Cardenas to the second crossing of the Rio Manteca 
somewhere in the vicinity of monument No. 74. 

The Rio Agua Pahid-Rio Pilones Ridge trail was cleared from Gatun Lake toward 
the Canal Zone boimdary for a distance of Ih miles. 

Se^'eral trails between New Chagres and Gatun \. ere investigated to find one suit- 
able for the use of the natives. A separate report of this was made to the engineer 
of maintenance. 

Miles of lines. — Transit, 46: stadia, 166: stadia side shots, 102: Y level, 129: precise 
level. 13; total, 456. 

Section of Office Engineer. 

The details of the work accomplished by this section are given in 
the report of the office engineer, which follows: 

Section of Office Engineer. 

C. J. Embree, Office Engineer. 

This section has continued to handle the engineering, architectural, electrical, and 
miscellaneous design work required for all divisions of the Canal except the mechanical 
division. 

The principal work handled has continued to be that of the electrical and building 
divisions. The various building and construction projects are described in full in the 
annual reports of the divisions concerned and mil not be repeated here, except by 
general mention of the most important projects. 

Administration liuilding, Coco Solo air station. 
Fitty-five thousand barrel concrete oil tank. 

Complete set of buildings tor Fort Clayton and Fort Davis, including officers' 
quarters, barracks, stables, incinerator, headquarters building, etc. 



108 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

A total of 685 working drawings was issued during the year, the work accomplished 
for the different divisions being as follows: 

Trac- 
ings. 

Building division 352 

Electrical division 278 

rolice and fire department 2 

Municipal division 15 

Locks division 12 

Paaama Railroad 8 

General 18 

Total 685 

During the year the average number of men working was 13^, with an average of 5 
on vacation, making a total of 16^ men on the rolls. 

During the year we installed a new 60-inch blue-print machine, with a print washer, 
also a 25 k. w. motor generator set and control equipment. 
During the year the following prints were issued: 

Square 
feet. 

Blue prints 221, 670 

White prints 19, 653 

Bro%m prints S, 715 

The average cost of blue and brown prints, including labor and material, has been 
$0.0118 per square foot. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Jay J. Morrow, 

Engineer of Maintenance. 

Brig. Gen. Chester Harding, United States Army, 
Governor, The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. 



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APPENDIX B. 

REPORT OF THE MARINE SUPERINTENDENT, MARINE DIVI- 
SION, DEPARTMENT OF OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 



Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, July 20, 1920. 

Sir: The following report is submitted, covering the operation of 
the marine division for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920: 

On April 15, 1920, the undersigned relieved Capt. L. R. Sargent, 
United States Navy, as marine superintendent. 

The terminal ports and the lighthouse subdivision remained 
throughout the year in charge of the offi.cials named in the last report. 

Due to activity of the Cucaracha slide, the Canal was closed to 
navigation for five days, March 21-24, 1920. Restriction of the 
channel by the slide since February 21 increased the number of 
casualties to shipping, through no fault of the personnel; but, fortu- 
nately, no serious damage was caused through this condition, although 
some of the largest ships in the world, notably the Renown and the 
Mount Vernon, were passed through during these slide conditions, 
reflecting credit on the efficiency of the pilot personnel. 

The Panama Canal tugs La Boca and Miraflores, loaned to the War 
Department for distant service, were returned. 

The U. S. S. Favorite, a vessel of 500 tons dead-weight, equipped 
with marine repair shop, wrecking apparatus, and powerful towing 
engine, and prepared to lift 25 tons, was received from the Navy 
Department for use and custody and commissioned as salvage vessel 
and lighthouse tender. She fills a long-felt need. 

All rear range lights were changed from fixed to flashing. Two 
spar buoys, which marked the anchorage for vessels carrying explo- 
sives in Cristobal Harbor, were removed. 

The two-story concrete building at Gatun, designed to meet the 
combined storehouse, repair, and office requirements of the light- 
house subdivision, was completed, replacing an old and poorly 
appointed wooden structure and enabling that subdivision to operate 
with increased efficiency under improved working conditions. 

In order to permit the assignment of pilots in rotation to duty at 
Gatun and Pedro Miguel locks, up to the present attended by annoy- 
ance resulting from shortage of quarters at those points, the marine 
division is erecting in each of these towns two 2-story frame houses, 
for occupancy by lock pilots only. 

Tlio following is a condensed statement of the operation of the 
board of local inspectors: 

On June 28, 1920, Lieut. Harry Champeno, United States Navy, was appointed 
engineer member, vice Lieut. Malcolm C. Davis, United States Navy, detached. 
Lieut. Commanders John G. Fels and Charles S^■ennson, ITnited States Naval 
Reserve Force, continued as chairman and member. respectiA ely. 

Semiannual inspections of all floatinp; plant of The Panama Canal and Panama 
Railroad Company were made and reports submitted. Forty-two hulls of commercial 

lOi) 



110 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

ships and Canal and railroad plant were inspected in dry dock. Annual inspections 
were made of 3 American and 17 forei^ii steamers and 132 motor boats, 59 of the latter 
being o^\^led by The Panama Canal, 5 by the Panama Railroad Company, and 68 by 
indiA'idiials and companies. Certificates of seaworthiness were issued to all these 
craft, except to the American steamer Ciilchra, which was reconverted into a dredge 
and had no need of certificate. The Paraiso bridge, both pontoon and superstructure, 
was inspected and recommendations concerning it were made to the Panama Railroad 
Company. Reports and recommendations were made in connection with surveys and 
appraisals of various Canal craft. Inspection and hydrostatic test were made of 67 
boilers, 60 of which were on Canal and railroad floating plant and 7 of which were on 
United States Army craft. 

Licenses were issued to 10 pilots, 13 masters, 21 mates, 30 engineers, and 126 naviga- 
tors of motor boats. By indorsement one pilot's license was extended and the grade 
of one license as naAigator of motor boats was raised . Licenses were denied 5 engineers 
and 28 navigators of motor boats. Two certificates of loss of motor boat navigators' 
licenses were issued. 

SHIPPING STATISTICS. 

The> total number of ships making the transit of the Canal in sea- 
going commercial traffic was 2,478, of which 1,180 were in transit from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific and 1,298 from the Pacific to the Atlantic; 
this does not include 32 launches, each of less than 10 tons register, 
and 7 yachts aggregating 764 tons, Panama Canal measurement. The 
aggregate gross registered tonnage of the 2,478 commercial vessels 
was 11,057,819, and their aggregate registered net tonnage 7,034,875. 
Their total net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, was 8,545,653 
tons. 

The commercial cargo carried through the Canal amounted to 
9,374,499 tons of 2,240 pounds. Of this, 4,092,516 tons were from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific and 5,281,983 tons were from the Pacific 
to the Atlantic. 

The total number of ships passing through the Canal in ballast was 
329, with an aggregate Panama Canal net tonnage of 1,129,616; 105 
with a tonnage of 458,383 were nortbound and 224, with a tonnage of 
761,233, were southbound. 

The total number of United States Government vessels making 
the transit of the Canal free of tolls was 266, of which 51 Vv'^ere bound 
from the Pacific to the Atlantic and 215 from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific. These consisted of 218 Navy vessels, 18 Army vessels, and 
30 merchant ships with cargo for the Navy. A total of 365,898 tons 
of cargo was carried by these vessels; 150,814 tons by Navy vessels, 
27,275 by Army vessels, and 187,809 by merchant vessels under 
control of the Navy. Four British tugs, with a tonnage of 413, 
Panama Canal measurement, but with minus United States equivalent 
tonnage, passed through the Canal free of tolls. 

Eight vessels, carrying passengers only, with an aggregate Panama 
Canal net tonnage of 56,940, and 24 vessels, with no cargo, but carry- 
ing excess bunker coal, with an aggregate Panama Canal net tonnage 
of 67,675, were included in the year's commercial traffic. 

The total number of commercial vessels without cargo, including 
those in baUast, ships with no cargo, but carrying excess bunker coal, and 
vessels with passengers only, but not including launches and yachts, 
was 361, with an aggregate Panama Canal net tonnage of 1,254,231. 
Five naval vessels of other nations, totaling 69,536 tons displace- 
ment, were also included in this traflic. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT, MARINE DIVISION. Ill 

Laden vessels totaled 2,117. Of these 927 were in transit from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific and 1,190 from the Pacific to the Atlantic, 
with aggregate net tonnages of 3,379,4,30 and 3,911,992, Panama 
Canal measurement, respectively. 

The average net tonnage of the commercial vessels was 3,449, 
Panama Canal measurement, that of the laden vessels was 3,444, and 
that of the vessels without cargo 3,474. The average cargo of the 
2,117 laden vessels was 4,428 tons. Ov^er the total of 2,478 vessels 
passing through the Canal the average of cargo was 3,783 tons per 
vessel. The ratio of cargo to net tons of ships carrying cargo was 
1,286 tons of cargo to each net ton. Distributed over the entire com- 
mercial traffic the ratio was 1.10 tons of cargo per net ton. 

During the preceding fiscal year 2,025 ships of 6,131,575 net tons, 
Panama Canal measurement, carried 6,877,649 tons of cargo through 
the Canal. The traffic for this fiscal year shows an increase in ves- 
sels, tonnage, and cargo amounting, respectively, to 22.37 per cent, 
39.38 per cent, and 36.31 per cent, with respect to the traffic of the 
preceding year. Comparison with traffic in other years is given in 
the appended Table No. 1. All previous traffic records, based on 
the number of commercial vessels through the Canal, are exceeded 
this year by 16.34 per cent. 

Vessels classified by nationalities in the respective numbers of each 
made the transit through the Canal during the fiscal year as follows: 
United States, 1,129; British, 753; Japanese, 118; Norwegian, 106; 
Chilean, 79; Peruvian, 75; French, 60; Spanish, 41; Dutch, 29; 
Italian, 26; Swedish, 19; German, 17; Danish, 9; Panamanian, 4; 
Brazilian, 3; Chinese, Portuguese, and Russian, 2 each; and Belgian, 
Colombian, Costa Rican, and Urugua3"an, 1 each. Comparison with 
the number of vessels of various nations making the transit during 
preceding years is given in appended Table No. 2. 
Respectfully, 

E. P. Jessop, 
Marine Super inUndent. 

Brig. Gen. Chester Harding, United States Army, 

Governor, The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Ckmal Zone. 



112 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 









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ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC. 

1919: 

July 

August 

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1919: 

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114 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



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APPENDIX C. 
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT, MECHANICAL DIVISION. 



Balboa, Canal Zone, July 19, 1920. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith the annual report rela- 
tive to the operations of the mechanical division for the fiscal vear 
ended June 30, 1920. 

ORCrANIZATIOX. 

The general organization of the division has remained essentially 
the same as at the beginning of the year. 

Superintendent, mechanical division, Commander E. G. Kintner^ 
C. Ci United States Navy. 

Assistant superintendent, Mr. H. H. Evans. 

Mr. G. S. Tower was appointed to the position of mechanical 
engineer, reporting for dutv December 10, 1919. This position was 
previously held by Mr. W. J. Auten, who resigned on August 25, 
1919, while on leave in the United States. 

Mr. W. H. Stone returned from duty with the American forces in 
France, where he held the rank of captain, Engineer Corps (Railway 
Transportation), U. S. A. He reported for duty on July 10, 1919, 
and immediately resumed his former position of general foreman^ 
Cristobal shops. *"' 

Mr. W. J. Daglish, on account of Mr. Stone's return, was relieved 
of his duties as general foreman and was appointed assistant general 
foreman, Cristobal shops, on July 10, 1919. 

PRINCIPAL WORK PERFORMED. 

There is given below an outline of the principal items of work 
performed during the year, listing only those on which considerable 
sums of money were expended. 

AT BALBOA SHOPS. 

(1) Completion of overhaul and repairs to ex-German merchant steamers Uarda 
(renamed Salaverry) and Anubis (renamed Paita). The former was delivered for 
operation July 14, the latter October 6, 1919, the Anubis having been considerably 
delayed by nondelivery of parts from the United States, held up by strikes. 

(2) Completion of the repairs and alterations to the CriMobal, of the Panama Railroad 
Steamship Line, the work including not only a thorough overhaul but also very exten- 
sive alterations. The vessel was changed from a coal burner to an oil burner. The 
accommodations for officers and crew were rebuilt. The passenger space was entirely 
changed and greatly enlarged, as was also the cold-storage system. The overhaul 
included installation of new boilers, refitting of main engines and practically all 
auxiliaries in the ship. 

(3) The steamship Azov was given a general overhaul of machinery and repairs, 
in dry dock, to the hull, including renewal of about 25 shell plates, numerous frames, 
and the lower half of the stem. 

(4) The U. s. S. Melville after arriving at this plant in tow in a disabled condition, 
with boilers out of commission, had installed modified furnace fronts and certain 
changes in her oil-burning system. 

115 



116 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

(5) The U. S. battleship Rhode Island was placed in dry dock on account of broken 
outside couplinp;. Repairs were made to the strut fastenings, which had been loosened ; 
new coupling and new propeller shaft were made from rough machined spares carried 
by the vessel. The Navy Department ordered this vessel to proceed to Mare Island 
Na^•y Yard, under one engine, ^^ hen it was found, after removal of the stern tube shaft 
to the shop, that it was cracked ; there was no material on the Isthmus suitable for the 
manufacture of this part. 

(6) The PeruAian cruiser Lima received extensive repairs, particularly to the 
boilers and hull structure in the vicinity of the machinery spaces, the rudder, and 
steering gear. A new radio house was constructed, also a new pilot house. 

(7) The steamship Acajutia, belonging to the Pacific Steamship Navigation Com- 
pany, was altered from coal burning to oil burning and received extensive repairs 
to her hull and machinery. 

(8) Repairs to United States Shipping Board vessels were made as follows: Ohiya, 
Sewickly, Ossining, Aimwell, Bonham, Lake Fitch, Cauker, Xenia, Western Cross, and 
Tanka. 

(9) The Italian merchant -vessel AnsaJdo San Giorgio I received extensive repairs 
to her Diesel engines. 

(10) The United States submarines stationed at Coco Solo were dry-docked and 
given miscellaneous repairs. 

(11 ~) The steamship Lady Sybil received general repairs. 

(12) The salvage of the steamship Olockson (owned by the United States Shipping 
Board), which had been sunk near the Pacific entrance of the Canal to extinguish a fire 
in the cargo of gasoline. 

(13) Other important ship work performed at Balboa shops was as follows: 

Motor schooner Santa Elena: Repairs to main engines and pumps, water lines, 
engine room condenser, and deck. 

Steamship Guatemala: Dock, clean and paint bottom; repairs to rudder and stem 
bushing. 

Steamship Achilles: Dock, clean and paint bottom; repairs to hull. 

Steamship Coalinga: Dock, clean and paint bottom and above load line; repairs to 
main engines, auxiliary machinery, boilers, oil lines, and sea Aalves. 

Steamship La Hahra: Dock, clean and paint bottom; repairs to engine room, boil- 
ers, propeller and stern bushing, steam and oil lines. 

Steamship Minnesotan: Repairs to anchor windlass, circulating pump, boilers, 
eneine room, and painting deck houses. 

Steamship Ardmore: Dock, clean and paint bottom; repairs to hull, steering engine, 
smothering system, tail shaft and propeller, sea valves, boilers, main engines, auxiliary 
machinery and lines, booms, stack guys, aisTiings, and hatch, and painting deck and 
hold. 

Steamship Lcmpoc: Repairs to boilers, main engines, copper pipe lines, and paint- 
ing hull above water line. 

Steamship 0-62: Repairs to boilers, auxiliary machinery, main steam and auxiliary 
lines. 

Steamship Cethana: Repairs to main engines and aiixiliaries, oil lines, and deck. 

Steamship Petunia: Repairs to boilers, main engines, and auxiliary machinery. 

Steamship San Joaquin: Dock, clean and paint bottom ; repairs to boilers and oil- 
burning system, main engines, auxiliary machinery, evaporator, deck steam lines, 
and rudder. 

Steamship Anita: Repairs to boilers. 

Steamship Benjamin Brewster: Dock, clean and paint bottom; repairs to boilers, 
main engines, auxiliary machinery, and hull. 

Steamship Torr/e/w; Dock, clean and paint bottom; repairs to cargo pumps, cargo 
lines, and auxiliary lines. 

Steamship JIvasco: Dock, clean and paint bottom; repairs to hull, stern bushing, 
and rudder. 

Steamship S. V. Harkness: Dock, clean and paint bottom; repairs to main engines, 
auxiliaries, cargo oil lines and valves, hull, spare tail shaft, and rudder. 

(14) Overhaul and repairing of dredges, scows, and tugs of the dredging division. 
On account of the slides which took place this year, the amount of these repairs was 
considerably increased. 

(15) The two sand cranes used in the gravel plant at Gamboa were rebuilt and 
reerected after ha\ ing been wrecked by a windstorm. 

(16) The manufacture of lumber froni timber cut on the Canal Zone has been con- 
tinued. The rate of consumption of se^•eral species now exceeds the rate of supply. 

(17) Four new (il-foot steel-frame j)assenger coaches were completed in the car shop 
and put into active service. These cars are notable on account of being trimmed 
with caoba blanca, a native wood. They were finished in the natural color. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT, MECHANICAL DIVISION. 117 

(18) Twenty-five 40-ton flat cars were rebuilt for the Alaskan Engineering Com- 
mission. 

(19) The following railway equipment was built: 

4 troop cars and 2 searchlight cars for the United States Army. 
1 magnet car for loading scrap. 

AT CRISTOBAL SHOPS. 

(1) Completion of the alterations to fit the steamship Middlehury as a cattle carrier. 

(2) The steamship Culehra received extensive repairs and alterations in connection 
with restoring her from her condition as a cattle carrier to her previous condition as a 
seagoing dredge. This vessel was moved to Balboa shops on April 6, 1920, for the com- 
pletion of the work on account of the many interruptions at Cristobal. 

(3) Extensive repairs in dry dock were made to planking and the frames of the tug 
San Juan. 

(4) Salvage of the steamship Murne (owned by the United States Shipping Board). 
This A^essel was raised after being sunk in Cristobal Harbor to extinguish a fire in the 
cargo of benzene. The vessel caught fire a second time and sank in the harbor on 
account of an explosion. She was again raised and unloaded. 

The following Canal equipment and other vessels were in dry dock 
for repairs during the year: 

BALBOA DRY DOCK. 

(a) Canal equipment: Tugs Bolivar, Cocoli, Empire, Gatun, Gorgona, La Boca, 
Mirufiores, barges Nos. 91, 131, 226; dredges Nos. 84, 86, Cascadas, Corozal, Culehra, 
Gamboa, Faraiso; scows Nos. 139, 140; caisson No. 1; supply boat No. 2. 

(b) Vessels other than Canal eqiiipment: Steamships Transvaal, Trolltind, Fort 
Russel, Oraton, Joan of Arc, Uarda. Benzonia, Brookland, Middlehury, Azov, Cristobal, 
Anuhis, Aysen, Bushrod, Guatemala, Iluasco, Bonham, Coalinga, Achilles, La Habra, 
Ardmore, Lake Elkwater, Acajutla, Lake Fabyan, Cavker, Lake Fitch, Lake Garza, San 
Joaquin, Benjamin Brewster, Lady Sybil, Lake Flynus, Relay, Cordelia, S. V. Harkness, 
Peru, Hivah Jah; United States steamships Chicago, Rhode Island, Melville, Ingraham, 
Gen. George W. Getty, Thornton, Sciota; submarines R~21, R-22, R-23, R-24, R-25, 
R-26, R~27, C-32; laimches Limon, Vacuum; submarine chasers No. 280, V-12; cable 
ship Guardian, cruiser Lima, tender Perico, Panama Railroad barge No. 13. 

CRISTOBAL DRY DOCK. 

(a) Canal equipment: Tugs Porto Bello, Engineer, Tavernilla, Coco Solo, Sanidad; 
barges Nos. 3, 17, 19, 26, 28^^49, 56, 150, 161; coal hoist No. 1, derrick barge No. 157, 
rock breaker Vulcan, supply boat No. 1. 

(6) Vessels other than Canal equipment: Steamships Cartegena, Caribbean, Jamaica, 
Manavi, Orotina, Nemesis, Paraiso, Poe, A. G. Force, San Bias, Crowley, Salvador, 
Cauca, Balboa, San Junn, Mecklenburg, Kuwa, Ottawa, Fasset, Boxley, Battonville; 
submarines C-2, C~3, C-34, C~44; submarine chasers Nos. 284, 285; submarine patrol 
boats Nos. 1841, 2232, 2235; schooners Aviator, Linda S., Laura C. Hall, Ady, W. H. 
Marston, Balsa; mine planters Graham, C. W. Field, No. 53; U. S. S. Breakicater, 
Eagle No. 14, Eagle No. 31; launches Pequeni, Wilhelm; Panama Railroad barges 
Nos. 1 and 2, Panama Steam Navigation Co. barge "S," tug San Juan, yacht Louise, 
United States Army barge. 

The total number of vessels other than tugs, barges, and dredges 
worked on at Balboa and Cristobal shops during the vear was: 
Balboa, 422; Cristobal, 642; total, 1,064. 

MISCEO.ANEOUS MATTERS. 

1. The accounting system has been improved so as to give shipping 
agents itemized costs. This change assists in making estimates for 
work and in the administration of the plant. 

2. The reclaiming mill has rolled 4:^8,654 pounds of scrap steel and 
iron into rods and bars since the mill was put in service in February. 

8. Metal parts to the amount of 1,202,781 pounds have been re- 
covered from scrap and used in repairs to Panama Railroad freight 
cars. 



118 



THE PAITAMA CANAL. 



4. Scrap lumber to the amount of 97,000 feet b. m. has been re- 
worked and used in repairs to raih'oad cars. 

5. The boih^r insj)ector who inspects and tests all steam boilers for 
The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad, except those on floating 
equipment, conducted 224 hydrostatic tests and 817 inspections of 
boilers. There are 178 boilers in service that are subject to his 
inspection. 

6. There were 54,122 gallons of paint manufactured during the year 
at a total cost of $120,448. 

7. Inspections and repairs were made during the year on miscel- 
laneous equipment as follows: Typewriters, 1,782; adding machines, 
329; comptometers, 166; cash registers, 1,02.3; scales, 3,103. 

8. The total output of native lumber of all species during the year 
was 1,457,805 feet b. m. The quantities of the various species are 
given, together with the names of the standard woods for which they 
were substituted. 



Native specie. 



Bateo, maria, ponulo, roble, espave. 
Alca\Ti 

First grade 

Second grade 

Caoba Blanca 

First grade 

Second grade 

Almendra, alcareto, ainargo 

Cedro Amargo: 

First grade 

Second grade 

Mangle Colorado 

Guayacon 

Nispero 



Grand total 1 , 457. 805 



Quantity 
produced 
ffeetb. m.). 



366,338 



41,173 

4,575 



148,094 

16,454 

819,683 

22,516 

2,502 

12,038 

23,405 

1,027 



Cost per 
thousand 



$50. 00 



70.00 
55. 00 



70.00 
55.00 
85.00 

85.00 
75.00 
85.00 
110.00 
110.00 



Substituted in the 
place of— 



Fir and yellow pine. 
Poplar. 



Mahogany. 
Oak. 



The economy of using native lumber can be determined by com- 
paring the cost of native lumber shown above with the market value 
of standard woods. To the saving, due to the lower sale prices, the 
ocean freight from the United States on the entire quantity must be 
added. Also Isthmian freight from the Atlantic to the Pacific side 
is saved on, perhaps, 75 per cent of the total. The expense of 
handling is, of course, also lessened. 



IMPROVEMENTS. 

1. A light repair shop is being constructed adjacent to the com- 
mercial piers at Cristobal to facilitate repairs to ships at the piers. 
It is expected to have this shop in operation about October, 1920. 
The shop has a floor 75 feet ])y 110 feet and contains principally 
machine-shop tools. It is located in one end of a .new concrete 
building, the other end being occupied by the suppl}^ department 
and steamship offices. 

2. A reclaiming roll was installed in Balboa shops to reroll mis- 
cellaneous steel and iron sera]) into round and rectangular section 
rods and bars. 

3. A shed has been constructed near the Balboa roundhouse to 
house the wreckinjj crane. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT, MECHANICAL DIVISION. 119 

4. An industrial railway has been constructed and is in use for 
conveying scrap wood from the wood shop to the boiler house, the 
cars being moved back and forth by hand. 

5. Work is under way to roof over between buildings 2 and 3, 
Balboa, to permit rearrangement of the pipe shop Avhich is badly 
congested. 

6. A large horizontal boring mill was installed at Balboa. 

7. Competitive examinations of applicants for apprenticeship were 
held. 

NEEDS FOR THE COMING FISCAL YEAR. 

1 . The construction of new shops and dry-dock facilities at Cris- 
tobal. This has been recommended for several years and is a matter 
of much importance, as the present plant is inadequate and much 
out of date. 

2. Provision of additional quarters at Balboa and Cristobal for 
both gold and silver employees. 

3. The replacement of worn and obsolete tools, particularly at 
Cristobal, because of the delay in providing the new shops. Many 
tools are old French tools or those used during construction. 

4. Enlargement of the gas plant for generation of oxygen and 
hydrogen to meet the demand. 

5. Installation of proper facilities for heat treatment of large 
forgings. 

STATISTICAL DAT.4.. 

The following statistical statements and plates accompany the 
report: 

Table No. 1, abstract of expenditures. 

Table No. 2, statement of overtime work performed. sKowin the per rent of the 
total pay roll. 

Table No. o, force report. 

Table No. 4. statement of foundryoutputs. 

Table No. 5. expenditures and output of the oxy-acetylene plant. 

Table No. 6, operation of Panama ('anal dry docks. 

Table No. 7. locomotive mileage and operating expenses, road service. 

Table No. 8, locomotive engine days and operating expenses, yard service. 

Table No. 9. car work, repairs by classes. 

Table No. 10, railway shops, indirect expenses, direct labor, shop expense p"' 
centage, and transportation expenses on locomotives and cars. 

Table No. 11, statement showing the power costs at Balboa shops. 

Table No. 12, statement showing amount of general Canal overhead added to 
the cost of mechanical division work for outsiders. 

Table No. 13, status as of June 30. 1920. 

Plate No. 20, sho^ving the cla.sses of work and source of revenue. 

Plate No. 21, showing the gross mechanical division overhead expense compared 
with the total direct labor charges. 

Plate No. 22. showing comparatively the productive labor, overhead expense, 
supervision, maintenance, and power consumptions of marine shops. 

Plate No. 23, showing the growth of work at Panama Canal repair wharves from 1910 
to 1920, inclusive. 

Respectfully submitted. 

E. G. KiNTNER, 

Superintendent, Mechanical Division. 
Brig. Gen. Chester Harding, United States Army, 

Governor, The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. 



120 



THE PANAMA CANAL,. 
Table No. 1. — Abstract of expenditures. 



Month. 



Labor. 



Division 
overliead. 



Machine. 



Material. 



Other 
exnense. 



Total. 



BAI.BO.'V SHOPS. 



July 

Auga'^t 

Septembpr. 

October 

November. 
December. . 



S182, 47G. 20 
217,319.15 
204,25.3.52 
199,623.89 
1« 1,677.96 
206,0t;5.27 



1920. 



January 214,380.70 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Total 

Average per month this year. 
Average per month last year . 

CRISTOBAL SHOPS. 

1919. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 

Average per month this year . 
Averase per month last year. 



July 

August 

September. 

October 

November . 
December. . 



1919 



1920. 



January.. 
February 

March 

April 

May 

J unc 



199, 648. 95 
245, 913. 54 
248, 998. 99 
199,674.97 
201,370.15 



$54,628.75 
54,101.20 
57,056.07 
47, 443. 86 
47, 326. 71 
64,101.10 



52,410.24 
.54, 681. 89 
64,0.5.3.49 
70, 497. 05 
51,387.87 
47, 455. 81 



$12, 913. 55 
14, 355. 77 
13', 089. 68 
13, 189. 69 
11,424.18 
12, 235. 25 



12,884.71 
11,867.73 
14, 972. 08 
15,364.29 
15, 998. 36 
15, 72S. 41 



1, 504, 343. 29 
208, 695. 28 
205,345.37 



665, 144. 04 
55, 428. 67 



164,023.70 
13,668.64 



$155,485.68 
138,014.69 
142,769.51 
158,731.43 
159,397.18 
151, 162. 73 



172, 218. 58 
125, 660. 71 
184, 717. 94 
152,95.3.28 
166, 917. 00 
140.351.72 



$103, 832. 99 
50, 587. 97 
57, 549. 79 
41,190.20 
38, 296. 66 
39, 783. 24 



42,819.01 
49, 491. z7 
46, 782. 10 
53, 164. 73 
1154,763.46 
.51,017.75 



1509.337.17 
474,378.78 
474, 718. 57 
460, 179. 07 
441, 122. 69 
473, 287. 59 



494,713.24 
441,350.55 
556, 4.39. 15 
540, 978. 34 
■588,741.66 
455, 923. 84 



1,848,380.45 
154,031.70 
144,946.16 



729,279.17 
60, 773. 26 
32, 216. 81 



5,911,170.66 
492,597.55 
382,508.34 



51,631.35 
.56, 176. 74 
52, 363. 32 
56,988.14 
48,030.43 
57, 779. 55 



65, 294. 85 
63,962.11 
73, 336. 59 
74, 302. 99 
66,631.05 
65,973.32 



17, 039. 59 
16,487.31 
14,791.20 
16,314.27 
14,437.76 
17,726.57 



20, 746. 74 
20,417.90 
23,086.22 
22, 868. 73 
19,370.67 
18,094.84 



732,470.44 
61,039.20 
48,318.05 



221,381.80 
18,448.48 



Total 

.\verage per month this year.. 
.Vverage per month last year. . 



2,34, 107. 55 
273, 495. 89 
259,616.84 
256,612.03 
232, 708. 39 
263, 784. 82 



279, 675. 55 
263,611.06 
319,250.13 
323,301.98 
266,306.02 
267,343.47 



71,668.34 
70, 588. 51 
71, 847. 27 
63, 758. 13 
61,764.47 
81,827.67 



73,156.98 
75,099.79 
87, 139. 71 
93, .365. 78 
70,758.51 
65, 550. 65 



2,692.44 
3, 028. 72 
2, 757. 22 
3, 533. 74 
2,602.98 
3,051.78 



3,457.16 
2,937.71 
2,723.25 
2,874.17 
3,017.14 
3,240.10 



35, 916. 41 
2,993.04 



15,605.99 
17,384.49 
15, 846. 90 
16,723.43 
14,027.16 
15,287.03 



16,341.87 
14, 805. 44 
17,695.33 
IS, 23S. 46 
19,015.50 
18,968.51 



3, 236, 813. 73 
269, 734. 48 
2.5:5,663.42 



886, .52.5. 84 |l99,9t0.11 
73,877.15 I 16,661.67 



23,461.68 
24, 747. 25 
26, 344. 69 
29, 495. 53 
21,849.26 
26,125.07 



24, 823. 57 
28, 679. 10 
30, 196. 59 
.33, 349. 94 
26, 999. 62 
23,916.57 



10,018.90 
35, 134. 22 
8, 314. 06 
2, 750. 80 
4,632.90 
3,776.52 



9,638.14 
23, 558. 79 

9,637.35 

25,516.52 

22,380.71 

373.11 



104, 843. 96 
135, 574. 24 
104,570.49 
109,082.4b 
91,553.33 
108,459.49 



123, 960. 46 
139, 555. 61 
138,980.00 
158,912.35 
138,399.19 
111,597.94 



319, 988. 87 
26,665.74 
20, 534. 98 



155,732.02 
12,977.67 
5, 874. 26 



1,465,489.54 
122,124.13 
74, 727. 29 



178,947.36 
162,761.94 
169,114.20 
188,226.96 
181,246.44 
177,287.80 



197,042.15 
154,339.81 
214,914.53 
186, 303. 22 
193,916.62 
164,268.29 



113,851.89 
85,722.19 
65, 863. 85 
43,941.00 
42, 929. 56 
43, 559. 76 



52,457.15 
73, 050. 06 
56, 419. 45 
78,681.25 
177,144.17 
51,390.86 



614,181.13 
609,953.02 
579, 289. 06 
569,261.55 
532,676.02 
581,747.08 



618,673.70 
580,906.16 
695, 419. 15 
699,890.69 
727, 140. 85 
567,521.78 



2,168,369.32 885,011.19 
180,697.45 73,750.93 
165,481.14 38,091.06 




1 Includes charges, $100,813.20, for work on the steamship Culebra, transferred from Cristobal to Balboa 
shop accounts. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT, MECHANICAL DIVISION. 121 

Table No. 2. — Statement of overtime work performed, showing the per cent of the total 

pay roll. 



July 

August 

September . 

October 

November . 
December. . 



Month. 



1919. 



1920. 



Balboa shops. 



Overtime. 



January 14, 605. 21 

February 19,636.90 

March 37, 387. 00 

April 42,232.77 

May ! 12,295.83 

June 8, 605. 85 



$29,165.06 
32,807.58 
18,934.50 
7,999.38 
15,678.72 
14,637.89 



Total 

Average per month this year . 
Average per month last year . 



253,986.69 
21, 165. 56 
23,586.61 



Per cent 

of pay 

roll. 



12.81 
14.13 
8.72 
3.74 
7.99 
6.63 



6.41 
9.31 
14.49 
16.19 
5.73 
4.01 



Cristobal shops. 



Overtime. 



$6,385.71 
0,900.33 
7,033.39 
6,501.61 
6, 193. 72 
6,380.07 



12,555.03 
12,446.39 
15,413.57 
12,973.16 
7,780.28 
7,070.62 



Per cent 

of pay 

roll. 



106,633.88 
9.18 8,886.16 
11.49 7,623.72 



10.31 
9.71 
12.30 
10.73 
11.94 
10.26 



17.95 
18.48 
19.81 
16.15 
10.53 
9.19 



13.11 
15.78 



Total. 



Overtime. 



$35,550.77 
38, 707. 91 
25,967.89 
14,500.99 
21, 872. 44 
21,017.96 



27, 160. 24 
32,083.29 
52, 800. 57 
55, 205. 93 
20,076.11 
15,676.47 



360,620.57 
30,051.71 
31, 210. 33 



Per cent 

of pay 

roll. 



11.20 
12.03 
8.54 
4.78 
7.90 
6.72 



8.27 
10.38 
14.36 
14.78 
6.28 
4.90 



9.18 
12.30 



Table No. 3. — Force report. 
[Average number of men actually working.] 



Balboa shops. 



Month. 



Gold. Silver. Total 



1919. 

July [ 774 

August I 778 

September I 796 

October 802 

November i 805 

December I 798 

1920. i 

January i 845 

February 761 

March 884 

April 905 

May 755 

June 806 

Total 9,709 

Average per month this year . ' 809 

Average per month last year . 583 



1,388 
1,412 
1,517 
1,453 
1,450 
1,442 



1,490 
1,415 
1,329 
1,372 
1,337 
1,264 



16,869 
1,408 
1,296 



2,162 
2,190 
2,313 
2,255 
2,255 
2,240 



2,335 
2,176 
2,213 
2,277 
2,092 
2,070 



Cristobal shops. 



26, 578 
2,215 
1,879 



Gold. Silver. Total 



186 
185 
186 
172 
174 
174 



189 
198 
218 
211 
215 
202 



2,310 
193 
113 



489 
418 
375 
480 
457 
462 



458 
480 
457 
580 
471 
411 



5,538 
401 
362 



Total. 



Gold. Silver. 



675 
603 
561 
652 
631 
636 



647 I 

678 I 

675 

791 

686 

613 



960 
963 
982 
974 
979 
972 



1,034 
959 

1,102 

1,116 
970 

1,008 



1,877 
1,830 
1,892 
1,933 
1,907 
1,904 



1,948 
1,895 
1,786 
1,952 
1,808 
1,675 



,848 I 12,019 22,407 
654 1,002 1,807 
475 I 696 1,658 



Total. 



2,837 
2,793 
2,874 
2,907 
2,886 
2,876 



2,982 
2,854 
2,888 
3,068 
2,778 
2,683 



34,426 
2,869 
2,354 



122 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 
Table No. 4. — Statement of foundry outputs. 



Month. 



Nonferrous. 



Patterns. Castings. Weight 



Iron. 



Patterns. Castings, 



Weight. 



1919, 

July 

August 

September , 

October 

November 

December , 

1920. 

January 

February 

March , 

April 

May 

June 

Total 

Average this year 

Average last year 



1,060 
1,369 
1,362 
955 
1,221 
4,443 



2,837 
2,357 
1,036 
1,903 
1,370 
840 



19,308 

28,086? 

27,097i 

15,985i 

27,961 

13,356i 



24,720 
21,533i 

9,460 
14, 388 
11,7591 

9,364i 



472 
39 
51 



20,759 
1,730 
2,276 



223,020 
18,585 
15,867 



3,417 
2,335 
2,663 
2,396 
2,961 
3,513 



3,055 
1,687 
3,157 
1,137 
1,055 
1,208 



604 
50 
58 



28,584 
2,382 
3,317 



143,3701 
130,226i 
117,173 
134,066i 
98,276 
129,358 



95,914 
58,893 
94,371 
76,801i 
141,362 
64,581 



1,284,393 
107,033 
144,598 



Month. 


Steel. 


Total. 


Patterns. 


Castings. 


Weight. 


Patterns. 


Castings. 


Weight. 


1919. 
July 


21 

18 
19 
19 
4 
14 

11 
19 
50 
12 
3 
5 


382 
334 
283 
590 
585 
413 

1,251 

733 

1,383 

1,151 

568 
266 


45,070 
34,860 
27,361 
24,093 
29,691 
26, 114 

37,571 
32,006 
55,439 
48,683 
44,235 
55,382 


134 
120 
145 
117 
102 
114 

124 
122 
128 
54 
07 
44 


4,859 
4,038 
4,308 
3,941 
4,767 
8,369 

7,143 
4,777 
5,576 
4,191 
2,993 
2,320 


207,748J 




193, 173i 


September 


171,631i 


October 


174, 145i 


November 


155,928 




168,828i 


1920. 
January 


158,205 


February 


112,432i 


March 

April 


159,270 
139,872i 


May 


197,356i 


June 


129,327i 






Total 


195 
16 
11 


7,939 
662 
632 


460,505 
38,375 
32,861 


1,271 
106 
121 


57,282 
4,774 
6,225 


1,967,918 


Average this year 


163, 993 


Average last year 


193, 326 







REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT, MECHANICAL DIVISION. 123 
Table No. 5. — Expenditures and output of the oxy-acetylene plant, Balboa shops. 



Month. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September , . . . 

Octol er 

November 

December 

1920. 

Ja nuary 

Fe bruary 

March 

April 

May 

Juiie 

Total 

Average this year 

Average last year 



Total 
expendi- 
tures. 



$3,039.44 

2, 77S. 49 
3,049.34 

3, 256. 23 
2. 636. 30 
1,649.50 



1,66S.26 
2,729.31 
3, 143 49 
3,334.29 
3,576.81 
3,393.71 



34,255.17 
2, 854. 60 
4,023.46 



Oxygen 
output 
(cubic 
feet). 



154,000 
123,200 
129, ,500 
151,. 800 
122, 800 
152, 700 



154, 700 
137,625 
161,375 
148,800 
151,450 
140,500 



1,728,450 
144,038 
123,042 



Acetylene 

output 

(cubic 

feet). 



70,777 
69, 142 
67, 851 
81,7.50 
60, 163 
85,664 



89, 477 
67, 564 
84,822 
89,058 
80,183 
82,676 



929, 127 
77,427 
73,756 



Hydrogen 
output 
(cubic 
feet). 



4,300 
29,600 
161,200 
9,500 
6,500 
8, 100 



58,400 
4,900 
3,700 
77, 100 
286, 700 
196,300 



846,300 

70, 525 

8,573 



Note. — Although the total expenditures for this year are considerably less than for the preceding year, 
it will be noted that the output is materially greater. This is due to the manufacture of oxygen gas by 
the electrolytic instead of the chemical process. 

Table No. 6. — Operation of Panama Canal dry docks. 



Month. 



Balboa. 



Operating 
expense. 



Vessels docked. 



Panama 
Canal. 



War and Navy. 



Number. Toimage, 



Commercial. 



Number. Tonnage. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 

Average per month this year 
Average per month last year 



$9,190.35 
10,485.48 
10, 985. 58 
11,071.83 
9, 306 14 
9,654.08 



10,334.32 
9,694.36 
10, 792. 40 
10,920.89 
11,787.03 
11,074 39 



17,000 
9,151 



1,940 
1,940 



153 
1,250 



125,296.85 
10,441.40 
8,947.23 



30 

2+ 
5- 



16 

1 + 
1 + 



32,669 
2,722 
1,466 



34 

2+ 
4 + 



6,532 
6,608 
7, 554 
16,171 
19,5.81 
19,410 



4,283 
16,970 
14,586 
18,400 



17,944 



148,039 
12,337 
21,077 



124 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table No. 6. — Operation of Panama Canal dry (Zocifcs— Continued. 





Cristobal. 




Operating 
expense. 


Vessels docked. 


Month. 


Panama 
Canal. 


War and Navy. 


Commercial. 




Number. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


1919. 
July 


$1,503.81 
1,615.98 
2,648.82 
1,308.89 
1 177.58 


5 
2 
1 

1 


3 
2 
4 

1 


201 

501 

1,781 

50 


3 

3 
3 
5 
4 

1 
4 
2 
3 
4 
4 


903 




6,326 




2,746 




2,953 




7,602 




2,710.15 

1,272.27 
1,643.07 
1,418.94 
1,414.89 
3,321.61 
16,533.99 


1 






9,700 


1920. 






2,605 






3 
3 
3 
2 

1 


680 
670 
1,542 
108 
505 


4,010 




4 
1 

4 

1 


2,363 




3,630 


May 


3,992 


June 


3,367 


Total 


26,570.00 
2,214.17 
2, 102. 47 


20 
2- 
4- 


22 
2- 

4+ 


6,038 
503 
574 


43 
4- 
3 


.50, 197 




4,183 




3,158 







1 Variation due to maintenance work. 
Table No. 7. — Locomotive mileage and operating expenses, road service. 



Month. 


Mileage. 


Water 
(gallons). 


Coal 
(pounds). 


Fuel oil 

(gallons). 


July . 


1919. 






28,309 


4,330,708 


623, 680 
790,920 
778,340 
616,860 
614, 280 
792,400 

630, 760 
352, 680 
3.33,040 
269,640 
268, 200 
273,220 


244, .574 




28,097 ; 3,666,096 
2.5,157 1 4,441,936 
24,744 i 3,870;286 
24,340 3,472,979 
29,216 1 3,526,520 

i 
28,575 ! 3,742,950 
25,894 1 3,903,589 
28,701 i 3,893,612 
27,689 3,441,953 
2.5,706 3,813,662 
28,362 I 3,840,384 


246, 292 


.'September 

October 

November 

December 

January 


1920. 


1 




24.5,936 
252, 472 
229,773 
277,464 

266,550 
289,680 




276,994 


\pril 


282,049 


May 


244, .518 


June 


306,305 


Total 


325,790 45,944,675 


6,344,020 


3, 162, 446 








Total 

lubricant 

cost. 


Total 

hostling 

cost. 


Repairs. 


Grand 
total 
cost. 


Cost per 




Heavy. 


I ight. 


Total. 


mile. 


1919. 
Julv 


$.54. 42 
46. 25 
48.94 
47.81 
4».01 
48. 84 

49.81 
49. 25 
53. ,55 
.54. 95 
.59.67 
50.10 


$1,640.70 
1,650.20 
1,720.35 
1,642. .57 
1,683.91 
1,709.29 

1,7.56.92 
1,770.92 
1,6.52.26 
1,^54.-33 
1,867.8:} 
1,6.59.25 


$4, 167. 63 

3,111.26 

2, .584. 17 

823.32 

6 J 0.37 

801. 59 

601. 2.5 
920. 27 
1,3.58.83 
3,. 593. 49 
1,648.30 
4, .579. 00 


$2, 248. 77 
1,391.10 
478. 33 
3,316.46 
2, 168. 15 
1,3.50.13 

1,052.99 
1,127.21 
2,757.71 
2,017,41 
2, 438. 08 
2, 60 1. 94 


$6, 416. 40 
4, ,502. 36 
3,062.50 
4, 139, 78 
2, 778. ,52 
2,151.72 

1,6,54.24 
2,047.48 
4, 116. .54 
5,610.90 
4,086.38 
7, 183, 94 


$18,888.35 
17,8:50.47 
16,47:5.04 
16, .513. 46 
14,723.67 
16,514.72 

14,981.85 
14,797.64 
16,265.94 
17,617.09 
17,281.20 
19,962.72 


?0. 67 


.\UCU*!t 


.64 




.66 


October ... 


.67 


November 


.01 




..57 


1920. 
January 


.53 




.65 


March 

.Vpril 


..56 
.64 


Mav 


.67 


June 


.68 


Total 


607.60 


20, 409. .53 


24,799.48 


22,969.28 


47,750.76 


201, 8.50. 15 


.62 



















REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT, MECHANICAL DIVISION. 125 
Table No. 8. — Locomotive engine days and operating expenses, yard service. 



Month. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Deccmlier 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



EnRine 

days. 



.')25 
586 
585 
fil3 
479 
569 



552 
525 
605 
537 
529 
591 



6,696 



Water 
(gallons). 



2,472,292 
2, 185, 654 
2, 555, 414 
2,303,214 
2,003,271 
1,951,230 



2,067,550 
1,790,411 
2,026,6.38 
2,021,997 
2,104,838 
2,037,616 



25,520,125 



Coal 
(pounds). 



1,. 353, 440 
1,791,220 
1,428,840 
1,677,760 
1,243,740 
1,. 550, 900 



1,3&3,400 
1,021,440 
1,403,580 
847, 620 
1,735,480 
1,035,280 



16, 452, 700 



Fuel oil 
(gallons). 



38, 602 
28, 774 
43, 777 
39,859 
49,503 
46, 896 



48, 270 
60, 262 
69, 6-33 
64, 726 
74, 044 
81,498 



645, 844 



Month. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September... 

October 

November. . . 
Deceml^er . . . 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May , 

June , 

Total.. 



Total Total 

lubricant i hostling 

cost. cost. 



.«48. 63 
62.89 
57.77 
57.92 
49.49 
63.24 



62.52 
47.84 
49.01 
56.70 
58.97 
64.95 



$1,185.39 
1,650.20 
1,226.49 
1,118.98 
1, 263. 34 
1,249.04 



1, 202. 15 
1,276.23 
1,211.16 
1,288.05 
1,351.25 
1,099.72 



679.93 15,122.00 



Repairs. 



Heavy. 



$2,941.88 
3, 811. 60 
4,715.11 
7, 975. .39 
4, 773. 10 
5, 749. 59 



7,032.80 
4,080.06 
3,. 372. 29 
4, 804. 13 
8, .508. 54 
8,326.34 



Light. 



$.5, 106. 18 
5, 710. 49 
6, 975. 99 
5, 448. 10 
6,080.54 
5, 433. 82 



5, 854. 22 
3,281.93 
5,302.31 
5,325.31 
7, 205. 01 
7, 059. 09 



Total. 



Grand 
total 
cost. 



66,090.83 



68,762.99 



$8, 048. 06 
9, 522. 09 
11,691.10 
13. 423. 49 
lO; 833. 64 
11,183.41 



12, 887. 02 
7,361.99 
8, 674. 60 
10, 129. 44 
15,713.55 
15,385.43 



$16, 896. 68 
19,930.99 
21,100.16 
23,29.5.36 
19,581.01 
20,931.41 



22,306.99 
15,433.75 
18,727.40 
17,545.77 
21,596.49 
24, 014. 53 



134,853.82 241,261.03 



Cost 
per day. 



$32.18 
34. 02 
36. 07 
38.00 
40.88 
36.61 



40.23 
29.40 
30.95 
32.70 
40.83 
40.63 



36. a? 



Table No. 9. — Car-work repair by classes. 



Class. 



Passenger. . . 

Box 

Caboose 

Coal 

Steel dump. 
40-ton flats. 
50-ton flats. 
Oil tank.... 



Heavy. 



41 
94 
10 
36 
168 
24 
&3 



Light. 



42 

604 

38 

46 

362 

103 

306 

3 



Class. 



Refrigerator 

Stock 

Rodger ballast 

Labor 

Wrecking 

United States Army labor 

Total 



Heavv. 



528 



Light. 



43 
16 
16 
143 



593 



2,315 



Table No. 10. — Railway shops. 



Maintenance-of-equipment 
shop expenses. 



Roundhouses: 

Balboa 

Cristobal.. . 

Car department 



Indirect 
expenses. 



$26,560.24 
11,084.92 
58,364.40 



Direct 
labor. 



$65,809.72 

20,974.13 

206, 758. 14 



Shop 

expense 

(per 

cent). 



47.60 
52. 85 
28. 22 



Transpor- 
tation 
expenses. 



1 $25,986.08 

1 14,541.32 

2 29, 162. 86 



Engine-house expenses. 



' Train supplies and expenses. 



126 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 
Table No. 11. — Power cost, B'llboa sJtops. 



Month. 



1919. 
July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

Jmie 

Total 

Average per m^onth this year 
Average per month last year . 



Steam. 



$1,505.38 
1,552.12 
1,642.42 
1,791.20 
1,451.14 
1,287.83 



1,303.69 
1,431.20 
1,. 395. 60 
1,373.39 
1,181.99 
1,248.80 



17, 164. 76 
1,430.39 
1,571.71 



Oil.i 



$18,074.64 
16, 738. 08 
16,422.61 
11,337.98 
9,079.09 
10,420.15 



10, 322. 96 
11,560.39 
11,474.57 
11,503.37 
12, 630. 81 
12,907.44 



152, 472. 09 

2 12,706.01 

17,622.79 



Electricity. 



$4,876.85 
6, 222. 74 
7,0.50.36 
6,925.53 

5. 322. 08 

6. 120. 09 



5, 233. 86 
4,448.30 
5, 678. 22 
8,042.97 
8,916.32 
8,683.10 



77,520.42 
6, 460. 04 
4,512.65 



Air. 



$2,431.89 
4,231.96 
4,663.22 
4,157.95 
4,326.56 
3,853.96 



4,104.51 
574. 13 
2,903.88 
4,87.5.20 
5,447.34 
5, 565. 83 



47, 136. 43 
3,928.04 
3,635.06 



Water. 



$1,980.11 
2, 197. 22 
1,968.85 
2,277.04 
2, 165. 72 
2,094.64 



1,798.96 
2, 773. 63 
3,079.28 
2, 827. 74 
1,559.81 
1,499.87 



26,222.87 
2, 185. 24 
2,293.43 



Total. 



$28, 868. sr 
30, 942. 12 
31,747.46- 
26, 489. 70 
32,344.59 
23,776.67 



22,763.98- 
20,787.65 
24,531.55- 
28, 622. 67 
29, 736. 27 
29,905.04 



320,516.57 
26,709.72 
29,635.64, 



' Includes entire consumption of Panama R. R. locomotives. 
* Reducton due to lesser purchase prices. 

Table No. 12. — Statement showing the amount of general ('anal overhead added to the 
cost of mechanical division work for outsiders. 







Shopwork. 






Dry dock. 




Total 


Month. 


Division 
charges. 


Amounts 
billed. 


Balance 

general 

Canal 

overhead. 


Division 
charges. 


Amounts 
billed. 


Balance 

general 

Canal 

overhead. 


general 

Canal 

overhead 

applied. 


1919. 
Balboa: 
July... 


$25,802.60 
352, 785. 91 
108,929.60 
259, 236. 97 
354,051.26 
197,985.26 

212,322.40 
159,494.15 
395, 566. 73 
107, 547. 67 
69,550.09 
2:54,254.63 


$28,5:50.34 
388,602.30 
120, 146. 21 
285, 686. 29 
389,628.47 
218, 182. 06 

229,020.11 
180, 545. 77 
435,353.18 
118,567.13 
77,366.76 
258,088.24 


$2, 727. 74 
35,816.39 
11,216.61 
26,449.32 
35,577.21 
20, 196. 80 

16,697.71 
21,051.62 
39,786.45 
11,019.46 
7,816.67 
23,833.61 


$9,051.60 
10,001.73 
10,583.08 
10, 678. 08 
8,226.14 
9, 609. 08 

8,:324.:52 
9,434.36 
8, 967. 90 
9,204.39 
9, 210. 03 
7,5:32.39 


$8,344.00 
39,034.15 
6,460.75 
7,961.20 
16,327.35 
12,853.27 

6, 462. 19 
21,992.05 

5, 685. 40 
10,293.09 

1.119.65 

7,153.85 


$707. 60 
29,032.42 
4,122.33 
2,716.88 
8,101.21 
3,244.19 

1, 862. 13 

12,557.69 
3,282.50 
1,088.70 

10,329.68 
378.54 


$2,020.14 


August 


64,848.81 


September 

October 


7,094.28- 
23, 732. 44 


November 


43,678.42 


December 


23,440.99 


1920. 
Januarv 


14,8:35.58 


February 


33,609.31 


March 


:36, 503. 95 


April 


12, 108. 16 


May 


2,513.01 


Jurie 


23,455.07 






Total 


2,477,527.27 


2,729,716.86 


252, 189. 59 


110,823.10 


141,447.65 


30,624.55 


282,814.14 






1919. 
Cristobal: 

Julv 


31,187.97 
133,676.09 
52,267.86 
68,457.37 
46, 855. 61 
75,926.00 

128,841.56 
42,912.87 
51,079.48 
99,223.22 
51,819.01 

102,458.75 


34,314.29 
147,037.80 
57,537.37 
75,315.24 
51,589.14 
&i, 568. 78 

141,732.73 
47,241.01 
.56, 187. 48 

109,:501.62 
60, 510. 05 

112,691.01 


3,126.32 
13,361.71 
5,269.51 
6,857.87 
4,733.53 
7,642.78 

12,891.17 
4,:528. 14 
5, 108. 00 

10,078.40 
8,691.04 

10, 232. 26 


978. 81 
1,280.98 
2,278.82 
1,233.89 
1,177.58 
2,6.3.5.15 

1,272.27 
1,043.07 
99:i. 94 
1,282.89 
2,670.61 
6,358.49 


1,431.30 
2,000.35 
1,674.95 
1,623.55 
3,564.70 
5,065.15 

3,419.75 
4,324.55 
2,. 564. 25 
3,480.05 
1,949.60 
2,026.20 


452. 49 
719.37 
603. 87 
389. 66 
2,387.12 
2, 430. 00 

2,147.48 


3,578.81 


August 


14, 081. OS 


September 


4,665.64 


October 


7,247.53 


November 


7, 120. 65- 


December 


10,072.78 


1920. 
Januarv 


15,038.65 


February 


2,681.48 i 7,009.62 


March . .". 


1,, 570. 31 6,678.31 


April.. 


2,197.16 12.275.56 


May 


721.01 7,970.03 


June 


4,332.29 5,899.97 






Total 


884,705.79 


977, 026. 52 


92,320.73 


2;j,806.50 


33,124.40 


9,317.90 1101,638.63 




' 


Grand total 


3,362,2.33.06 


3,706,743.38 


344, 510. .32 


134,629.60 


174,572.05 


39,942.45 384,452.77 



Note.— Figures in heavy-face type denote deficit. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT, MECHANICAL DIVISION. 127 

Table No. 13. — Mechanical division, fiscal year 1919-20. 

Status as of June 30, 1920: 

Overhead expense: Credit. 

Balboa $47, 852. 50 

Cristobal 43, 525. 84 

S91,378.34 

Reserves: 

Repairs to machinery 9, 367. 43 

Repairs to buildings i 3, 575. 94 

Repairs to structures 4, 740. 90 

Gratuit V (accrued leaveand holida v time) 2:59, 300. 08 

2:39,832.47 

Depreciation: 

Cranes 2, 182. 22 

Autos 336. 93 

Dry dock 30, 000. 00 

2 32,519.15 

Stock on hand 32, 920. 54 

Work in progress: 

Balboa 548, 357. 27 

Cristobal 237, 732. 26 

786,089.53 

Total 1, 182, 740. 03 

' Debit. Temporary condition due to the scaling and painting of the structural steel in the shop build- 
ings during May and June. 

2 The total amount of depreciation set aside for the Balboa dry dock since the account was established, 
July, 1917, is $90,000. 



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APPENDIX D. 

REPORT OF THE CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, SUPPLY 
DEPARTMENT. 



Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, July 30, 1920. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report covering the 
operations of the supply department for the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1920: 



ORGANIZATION. 



The organization of the department continued substantially the 
same as outlined in the annual report of June 30, 1919. 



PERSONNEL. 

There has been no material change in the personnel. Mr. R. K. 
Morris continued as chief quartermaster; Mr. Roy R. Watson as 
superintendent; Mr. J. J. Jackson as general manager, commissary 
division; IVIr.^W. B. Brown as superintendent, cattle industry divi- 
sion; and Air. M. D. Smith as general storekeeper. 

LABOR. 

In June, 1919, the silver force was 17,071 and the gold force 
3,290, or a total of 20,361. In June, 1920, the force consisted of 
17,023 silver employees and 4,608 gold employees, or a total of 
21,631 actually working. This increase of 1,318 gold employees is 
partially due to the employment of a number of gold employees to 
replace silver employees at the time of the strike, and also the employ- 
ment of gold skilled help in the building and mechanical divisions. 
There will probably be a material reduction in both gold and silver 
forces within the next few months. 

There was considerable labor unrest during the year which culmi- 
nated in a general strike of the silver employees on February 24. 

During the year adjustments in silver rates of pay were made on 
July 1, 1919, and February 1, 1920. A further adjustment was made 
on July 1, 1920. In each case such adjustments were based on the 
increased cost of living. 

The number of silver employees on the rolls each month through- 
out the vear was as follows : 



Julv 18, 185 

August 17, 690 

September 18, 219 

October 16, 432 

November 16, 243 

December 18, 123 



Januarv 18, 214 

February 18, 231 

March 16, 700 

April 17, 754 

May 17, 074 

June 17, 023 



8847—20 9 129 



130 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

This shows a fluctuation between the maximum and minimum, 
number of men on the rolls of 1,988 men, or 11 per cent, based on the 
average number of men employed throughout the year. 

QUARTERS. 

Applications on file for family quarters for gold employees on 
June 30, 1919, were 806, as compared with 618 on June 30, 1920. 
The c|uarters situation has been considerably congested, occasioned 
partly by the number of men returning from military service, all of 
whom were placed at the head of the list for assignment to first 
quarters available of the class to which they were entitled when 
they entered the service of the Army or Navy. 

The number of applications on file for silver family quarters on 
June 30, 1920, were as follows: 

D. Q. M., Balboa Heights 44 

D. Q. M., Pedro Miguel 7 

D. Q. M.. Gatiin 6 

D. Q. M., Cristobal 690 

• 

Total 747 

The following buildings were transferred from Las Cascadas to 
other districts for use of gold employees as quarters : 

7 type 15's to Pedro Miguel for use of 7 families. 
3 type 7's to Pedro Miguel for use of 4 families. • 

3 type 7's to Cristobal for use of 6 families. 
2 type 7's to Gatun for use of 2 families. 

1 type 16 converted into bachelor quarters and moved to Balboa (building 
located near coaling plant for use of operators). 

One quarantine detention building at Balboa no longer needed by 
the health department w^as converted into eight apartments for gold em- 
ployees' families. Six ward buildings fomerly a part of Ancon 
Hospital were converted into 22 sets of cjuarters for gold employees' 
families. 

Thirty-nine 12-family houses and ten 32-room bachelor houses 
have been authorized by the Panama Railroad Company for use of 
dock and coaling plant laborers at Cristobal. The usual rent of $5 
per month per family and $2 per bachelor will be charged to employees 
occupying these quarters. Twenty-four families were assigned during 
the month of Juno to two of the houses which were all of the lot that 
had been completed during the year. 

A building located in the Panama Railroad 3^ards, Panama, for- 
merly used to house two families of gold employees was converted 
into a six-apartment house for silver employees, as it was considered 
that the location and construction of the building made it undesir- 
able for continued use to house families of gold employees. 

Camp Otis, village of Las Cascadas, which had been abandoned by 
the Army, was turned back to the Canal in October, 1919. Some of 
the better buildings were removed to other districts and rcerected for 
use of gold employees, the remainder being left for the purpose of 
providing homes for silver employees who were temporarily out of 
work and where they could support themselves and families at a 
nominal expense and would not be subject to the general rules in 
regard to vacating quarters when employment is terminated, should 



KEPORT OF CHIEF QUAETERMASTER, SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 131 

they be employed temporarily while living in this settlement. The 
village suits this project very well, as it is not in close proximity to 
active units of the Canal and therefore does not interfere with them. 
West Indian families are permitted to rent a set of c|uarters at a rate 
of $2.50 per month, with 50 cents additional for each hectare of land 
which they desire for gardening, poultry raising, and growing of fruit 
trees. Tlie colony was started in November, 1919, and at the end 
of June, 1920, there were 40 families who had taken advantage of the 
opportunity to have a home at a nominal cost. 

Twenty-six garage stalls were built at Balboa, 10 at Cristobal, and 
8 at Pedro Miguel from funds appropriated for this purpose during 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919. 

ZONE SANITATION, 



Garbage collection for the Canal Zone has been carried on by the 
supply department in all districts except Cristobal and Army and 
Navy reservations. Incinerators were operated at Pedro Miguel 
and Gatun by the supply department but were handled by the health 
department at Cristobal and the municipal engineering division at 
Balboa. The cost of handling garbage for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1920, was $28,606.38, as compared with $20,935.13 for the 
previous year, 

MOTOR TRANSPORTATION, 



Additional Ford trucks were purchased during the year to meet 
the requirements of the various divisions in handling material. Tlie 
supply department has operated the greater part of all the motor 
transportation for the Canal, exceptions being with cars driven by 
repair mechanics, where complete repair kits and small quantities of 
repair material are kept aboard the cars for emergency use, such as 
electrical and telephone material, and where lockmen and coaling plant 
and oil plant men have to be transported quickly to their work to 
handle ships. 

Vehicles on hand and operated by all departments. 



Ford cars, J-ton delivery 

1-ton trucks. . . _ ." 

1 Vton trucks 

3\-ton trucks 

2 J-ton trucks (electric) 

2-ton truclvs 

Ford passenger cars 

Comi jination passenger and delivery, changeable . 

Hearsp 

Ambulance 

Motorcycles 

Bus, 1 j-ton 



1919 



The above transportation is used by the commissary, electrical, 
quartermaster, hospital, post office, and mechanical divisions; police 
and fire division not included. Reduction in one-half ton delivery 
cars accounted for by conversion to combination, 12; to passenger, 
5; condemned, 1; and to trucks, 2. 



132 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



ANIMAL TRANSPORTATION. 



Animal transportation has been further reduced and replaced by- 
motor transportation. The animals that are still in service are used 
for drav.'ing mowing machines, garbage wagons, and material wagons 
where roads do not permit the use of motor trucks. 



Animals. 



Number on hand July 1, 1919 , 

Received during year 

Sold or surveyed 

Transferred to other departments and cattle industry. 
On hand Jime 30, 1920 , 



Horses. 



39 




Mules. 



194 
3 
17 

143 



Cattle industry. 




Mules. 



Onband July 1, 1919 

Received during year 

Sold and surveyed 

Transferred to other departments 
On hand June 30, 1920 



137 



25 

2 

110 



MATERIAL AND SUPPLIES. 

A total of 881 requisitions was prepared and forwarded to the 
general purchasing officer, as compared with 898 during the preceding 
year. The total value of material received during the fiscal year was 
$7,812,258.86, as compared with $7,832,845.61 for the preceding fiscal 
year. The local purchases amounted to $1,650,271.25, as compared 
with $1,452,153.35 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919. Material 
consigned to The Panama Canal came forward in 208 steamers. 

On June 30, 1920, the value of material in stock was $5,249,300.15, 
as against $6,001,451.24 on June 30, 1919, not including the value of 
obsolete material and scrap. The following statement shows ma- 
terial on hand at beginning and end of year and total of all issues 
from the diflerent storehouses for 1919 and 1920, exclusive of obsolete 
material and scrap: 



On hand June 30, 1019. 
On hand Juno 30, 1920. 

Issned 1918-19 

Issued 1919-20 



General 
storehouse. 



$4,332,763.70 
3, 765, 999. 30 
9, 479, 634. 02 
8,379,984.19 



Cristobal 
storehouse. 



$7 i9, 228. 87 

828,331. 6-1 

2,078,800.88 

2,839,380.58 



Paraiso 
storehouse. 



$919, 458. 67 
654,969.21 
698,655.34 
746,944.04 



Total. 



$6,001,451.24 
5,249,300.15 
12,157,090.24 
11,966,308.81 



SALES. 



Table No. 3 attached covers total of all classes of sales for the year, 
showing 95,683 sales, amounting to $3,025,398.18. Sales to steam- 
ships show an increase of $97,039.85, and 3,265 vessels were handled, 
as compared to 2,156 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919. 



EEPORT OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTEE, SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 133 

During the year a total of 248,294 requisitions and foreman's orders 
was handled, distributed as follows: 

General storehouse 156, 415 

Cristobal storehouse 76, 243 

Paraiso storehouse 15, 636 

The consumption of cement for the year was 158,089 barrels. 

SURPLUS, OBSOLETE, AND SCRAP MATERIAL AND EQUIPMENT. 

The Mount Hope obsolete storehouse, under supervision of the 
storekeeper, Cristobal, was operated as during previous years as a 
concentration point for obsolete and surplus material. Iron and 
steel scrap operations were continued at the Mount Hope scrap yard; 
all other scrap operations, including miscellaneous metals, being trans- 
ferred to the general storehouse at Balboa, in connection with which 
there was erected a building to properly house such operations, in- 
cluding the reclaiming of material for return to stock. 

During the year two scrap shears were purchased and installed at 
the Mount Hope scrap yard for the purpose of facilitating the cutting 
and classifying of scrap to conform to Panama Canal scrap classifi- 
cation effective July 1, 1920, with the end in view of securing more 
favorable prices for Panama Canal scrap. Results to date have been 
very satisfactory. It is anticipated that all scrap now on hand will 
be cut up, classified, and sold by December 1, 1920, at which time it 
is intended to transfer the two scrap shears from Mount Hope to the 
general storehouse, Balboa, where a modern scrap dock was con- 
structed during the year, and where all future scrap operations will 
be handled. 

During the year 20,378 tons American scrap were sold; 13,981 tons 
at San Francisco, 593 tons at New York, and 5,804 tons in Italy. 

Table No. 10 attached indicates status of obsolete and surplus ma- 
terial at the beginning and end of the fiscal year, the receipts and 
issues during this period, and the balance on hand June 30, 1920. 

Table No. 11 herewith shows American scrap operations during the 
fiscal year. 

The French scrap situation is as follows : 



Tonnage. Price. 



On hand June 30, 1919 

Received during year 1919-20 

Shipped on Rovelta contract, 1919-20 

Balance on hand June 30, 1920. 



9, 420. 20 



$5.65 



9,429.85 
None. I 

9.59 ! 5.65 



$53,278.65 
54.' i? 



5.65 



53, 224. 48 



Table No. 5 attached gives details of sales from the obsolete and 
general storehouse of surplus, obsolete, and scrap material, equip- 
ment, and supplies, the original cost of which was over -SSOO, to be 
reported to the Secretary of War. 



FUEL-OIL PLANTS. 



Operation of the Balboa and Mount Hope fuel-oil plants continued 
under the supervision of the general storekeeper during the fiscal year. 



134 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Contract to furnish fuel oil was entered into witli the West India 
Oil Co. for 300,000 barrels, at $1.12 per barrel, delivered into Panama 
Canal tanks at Mount Hope; and 700,000 barrels, at $1.29 per barrel, 
delivered into Panama Canal tanks at Balboa. This contract expired 
June 30, 1920, but was subject to renewal to December 31, 1920, 
which option was exercised in view of favorable price covering same. 

Construction of two 55,000 barrel capacity concrete tanks, one at 
Balboa and one at Mount Hope, was started during the year and was 
90 per cent complete on June 30, 1920. 

Table No. 12 attached indicates total fuel oil handled by the Bal- 
boa and Mount tlope fuel-oil plants, in amount 5,620,986 barrels, 
for 1,195 vessels, including both receipts and issues. 

GASOLINE STORAGE. 

Storage of bulk gasoline at Balboa and Mount Hope continued 
during the year, although none was received, due to difficulty in 
arranging delivery of this commodity in bulk, except that 484,045 
gallons were purchased in containers from the salvaged cargo of the 
steamship Oloclson. On account of the deteriorated condition of 
the containers it was necessary to place this gasoline in tank storage. 



PANAMA CANAL PRESS. 

The value of the output of the printing plant was $158,406.79, an 
increase of $10,779.36 over the preceding year. The value of the 
output of the stationery section was $203,106.71, an increase of 
$45,610.53 over the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919. The combined 
business of both sections was $361,513.50, an increase of $56,389.89 
over the preceding year. 

The most important feature of the year's work was the installation 
of the commissary coupon section for the printing of commissary 
books, which is now in satisfactory working order. It is estimated 
that this addition will effect a saving of approximately $30,000 
annually over United States contract prices. 

The value of stock on hand at the close of the year was $109,605.55, 
as compared with $98,103.52 for the preceding fiscal year. This 
increase was occasioned by the additional stock required in connection 
with printing commissary coupon books. 

The total value of material issued was $158,406.79, as compared 
with $147,627.39 for the preceding year. This increase was due to 
the printing of a standard stock catalogue, foremen's order books, 
of which only a small supply was left over from the last fiscal year, 
as well as folders for the Washington and Tivoli Hotels. 

The total value of material used in manufacture was $70,022.28, 
as compared with $63,634.43 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919. 

The following table shows the principal items of manufacture : 



Forms 32, 22.3, 234 

Books, coupon 7ir),000 

Pamplilets, etc 153, 472 

Sheets, carbon 203, 700 

Time tables 1 , 600 

Cards, guide, etc 3fil , 7 1 r. 

Stamps and datcrs 2,'MW 

Cardboard 137,391 

Paper, siieets 3, 570, 1<«) 

Paper, rolls (pounds) 222,095 



Pads, desk 100 

Pads, scr;itch 105, 561 

Sheets, ruled 148, 100 

Taj;s, assorted 1, 405, 450 

(anal Records 467,800 

I ! i ud ers 2, 493 

Prof:rams 35, 543 

Folders 139,875 

Envelopes 416,387 



KEPOKT OF CHIEF QUABTEEMASTER, SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 135 
SUBSISTENCE. 

Mr. Roy R. Watson, superintendent of the supply department, 
remained in charge of the subsistence branch, assisted by an inspector. 

On June 30, 1920, the department operated the hotels Tivoli and 
Washington on the mainland, the Hotel Aspinwall on Taboga Island, 
three cafeterias, four popular-priced restaurants, and two lunch 
rooms for the gold employees. Three labor messes were operated 
for the silver employees. 

The hotels Tivoli and Washington were operated on the European 
plan and the Hotel Aspinwall on the American plan. Owing to popu- 
lar demand among the patrons, the Ancon restaurant was trans- 
formed into a cafeteria with a combination of k la carte service. The 
Hotel Washington is owned and financially operated by the Panama 
Railroad Company under the management of the supply department. 

The total amount of salaries and wages for the fiscal year was 
$156,151.23, an increase of $32,296.49, making the proportion of net 
pay roll to revenue 18.31 per cent, an increase of 1.82 per cent above 
last year. The increase in pay roll is accounted for by the higher 
rates of salaries established during the year for both gold and silver 
employees. 

The line restaurants and cafeterias showed a net loss of $4,758.84 
and the labor messes a profit of $5,516.57. The Hotel Tivoli showed 
a net profit of $15,763.47; the Hotel Washington was operated at a 
net gain of $24,046.01. 

An increase of revenue is noted in the hotels Washington and 
Tivoli. This increase is due to resumption of travel of the general 
public since the restrictions caused by the war have been removed. 

COMMISSARY DIVISION. 

The commissary division remained in charge of Mr. J. J. Jackson, 
general manager. There was an increase in the business of the com- 
missary division as a whole. In the wholesale manufacturing plants 
there was a decrease of approximately $780,000. This decrease was 
due to the decrease in the personnel of the Army and Navy on the 
Isthmus. 

The bakery, coffee-roasting plant, Cristobal laundry, ice plant, 
milk-bottling plant, and industrial laboratory show an increase in 
the volume of business over the fiscal year 1919; and the abattoir, 
ice-cream plant, sausage factory, pickling department, and the Ancon 
laundry show a decrease. The increase in the Cristobal laundry is 
due to a steadily increasing steamship business. The increase in the 
milk-bottling plant is due to the increased production of the local 
dairy. 

While fewer cattle were slaughtered in the abattoir than in 1919, 
the local consumption was somewhat larger, the decrease being due 
to the temporary suspension of beef shipments to the Army in the 
United States. 

Due to the purchasing of Colombian beef on large contracts, the 
retail prices of beef were kept at approximately the same figures as 
for the fiscal year 1919. 

General market conditions throughout the year have been prac- 
tically unparalleled, and it has been extremely difficult to secure and 



136 THE PANAMA CA:N-AL. 

maintain an adequate supply of all commodities. It has been the 
general policy of the commissai\y division to hold purchases as lo^v 
as possible in order that they would not have a large stock of mer- 
chandise on hand in case a material reduction in prices took place. 
This policy has resulted in a reduction of stock on hand and a reduc- 
tion in investment in commissary stocks. 

On account of the market conditions it was found necessar}'' to 
send a representative of the commissary division to New York to 
cooperate with the purchasing agent, and as a result very favorable 
purchases in dry goods were made by taking advantage of spot pur- 
chases in the New York market. On account of the general market 
conditions and the policy adopted, no very large purchases were 
made. 

The commissary division was probably more seriously inconven- 
ienced by the strike of silver employees than any other branch of the 
Canal activities. Advance information was obtained that the strike 
would probably be called and every precaution possible was taken 
in the way of shipping large stocks to line commissaries from the 
wholesale units. As a result there was an ample supply of all non- 
perishable goods on hand at all commissaries when the strike was 
called. Silver employees were replaced by gold emploj^ees who 
volunteered from other departments and the plants were kept in 
operation without serious inconvenience. 

COSTA RICAN AGENCY. 

On account of unsatisfactory transportation it was decided to 
close this agency the latter part of 1919. Necessary notice was 
furnished the planters before the agency was closed. In view of 
improved transportation facilities within the past few months it 
has been decided to reopen this agency, but to confine purchases to 
vegetables and fruits which could stand shipment, such as oranges, 
potatoes, etc. The Costa Rican market also offers at times very 
favorable opportunities for the purchase of sugar and coffee. 

CHANGES, ALTERATIONS, AND IMPROVEMENTS IN RETAIL COMMISSARIES. 

Tanks for storing kerosene in bulk were installed in the Ancon 
market and Ancon, Balboa, La Boca, Pedro Miguel, Red Tank, 
Gatun, and Cristobal commissaries. 

A new electric freight elevator was installed in Gatun commissary, 
and at the Pedro Miguel commissary the ice box was remodeled and 
equipped with a small mechanical refrigerating machine. 

The two-story building which is to house the new Mount Hope 
commissary is practically completed. It is of frame construction, 
120 by 66 feet 6 inches, and will have 38 retail sections and be 
equipped with an electric freight elevator, a 6,000-gallon kerosene 
oil tank, and cold-storage department cooled by mechanical refrigera- 
tion. When this store is placed in operation it will handle the busi- 
ness now transacted by Camp Bierd commissary and eventuall}^ 
the silver trade, which is now being taken care of at the Cristobal 
commissary. 

Large sales of commissary supplies were mado, to iiaval and Army 
transports during the last fiscal yc^ar, approximately $37,000 worth 
of foodstuffs and commissary supplies being sold to the Pacific Fleet 



EEPOET OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 137 

in July, 1919. The U. S. A. T. Mount Vernon took $53,661.28 worth 
of supphos during her stay at the port of Cristobal, from May 25 to 
June 5. 

PRODUCTS SHIPPED TO THE UNITED STATES. 

Shipments of various products, exclusive of beef, to the United 
States during the fiscal year were as follows : 



Steer liides, pounds 1,574,735 

Oleo oil, pounds 127, 736 

Oleo stearine, pounds 104,116 

Inedible grease, pounds 588, 559 

Dried blood, pounds 141,595 

Cocoa, pounds 12, 839 

Dried tankage, pounds 193,796 

Horns, pounds 51, 006 

Hoofs pounds 32, 235 

Bones, pounds 44, 846 



Horn piths, pounds... 
Switch hair, pounds.. 

Hides, mule, each 

Hides, horse, each 

Skins, calf, each 

Neatsfoot oil. gallons. 

Middles, beer, set 

Weazands, beef, each. 

Bladders, each 

Bungs, each 



1,869' 

1,618 

26 

33 

583 

311 

3,780 

5,070 

5,576 

9,715 



The total value of these shipments was $589,142.67. 

FRESH BEEP SHIPMENTS. 

The following is a statement of beef exported to the United States 
Army during the fiscal year: 

Pounds. 

26,888 forequarters, total weight 3, 197, 228 

26,887 hindquarters, total weight 3, 055, 713 

Shipments were made to different ports as follows: 

Pounds. 

37 shipments to New York 5, 941, 071 

12 shipments to vSan Juan, Porto Rico 257, 091 

1 sliipment to San Diego, Calif 58, 779 

Total 6, 256, 941 

PUBLICITY. 

Increasing efforts have been made to acquaint the steamship 
trade with the facilities and lower prices of beef and other stores at 
the Panama Canal terminals. To this end letters have been written 
to many of the more important steamship companies and items have 
appeared from time to time in The Panama Canal Record. 

MATERIAL SALVAGED FROM STEAMSHIP "mARNE." 

From the wreck of the steamship Marne, which burned to the 
water's edge m the harbor of Cristobal on January 24, a great c|uan- 
tity of damaged material was received and laundered in tiie commis- 
sary plants. The Cristobal laundry handled 192,157 pieces and the 
Ancon laundry approximately 70,000 pairs of stockings and 10,000 
yards of assorted dry goods. 



CATTLE INDUSTRY. 



The cattle industry division, comprising the cattle operations, 
pastures, plantations, dairy, hog farm, poultry farm, and the opera- 
tion of the cattle steamers, continued under the supervision of Mr. 
W. B. Brown. 



138 THE PANAMA CANAL. 



PURCHASES. 



The delivery of cattle on the coutract for 1918-19 was 
completed with the one hundred and thirty-fourth voyage of the 
steamship Caribbean; July 19, 1919; there having been left over on 
the old contract from deliveries to June 30, 1919, a total of 1,063 
head, at $0.0495 per pound. 

On February 20, 1919, we closed a coutract w^ith the Ganaderia 
Colombiana for a minimum of 30,000, maximum of 40,000 beef steers, 
and a minimum of 10,000, maximum of 20,000 canners at a flat rate 
of 80.0507 per pound on board the ship, the entire 40,000 to 60,000 
head to be accepted by us within 12 months. 

Due to the termination of the war, the Army canceled their order 
for 20,000 liead, which they had requested us to purchase in addition 
to our own requirements in the year 1919-20. As a result of these 
changes it w^as necessary to secure a modification of the contract 
entered into with Colombian interests. The following modifications 
were agreed to: 

1. To cancel all canners. 

2. To furnish the maximum of 40,000 head of beef cattle as per sjiecifications in 
the original contract. 

3. To extend delivery date six months, or Tintil January 1, 1921. 

In consideration of the above we agreed to increase the price from 
SO. 0567 per pound to $0.0595 per pound. 

Shipments of cattle from Colombia under these contracts were 
continued during the fiscal year 1920. On June 30, 1920, we had 
15,833 head still due on contract, which will bo transported to the 
Isthmus between July 1, 1920, and January 1, 1921. 

Since signing this contract prices of cattle have shown a steady 
increase. Cattle which the Canal purchased under contract at 
$0.0595 per pound are selling in the local markets of Colombia at 
from 9 to 9^ cents per pound. 

With the stock now on hand and under contract we have sufficient 
beef to last from a year to eighteen months after the termination of 
the contracts. These purchases have resulted in a material saving 
to Canal employees in the price of beef and to Army and Navy 
organizations located on the Isthmus. 

rurchase was made in Nicaragua of 1,101 head of cattle at a price 
of 4 cents per pound. In view of the long haul and consequent 
increased cost of transportation, 4-cent cattle in Nicaragua were 
practically no cheaper than 6-cent cattle in Colombia. The Nicara- 
guan cattle are also not as good quality as the Colombian cattle. 

In addition to the above there were purchased in Colombia 6,167 
fat hogs at 12 cents per pound; 804 shoats at 11 cents per pound; 
826 sows at 12| cents per pound. Local purchases were made on 
the Isthmus of 561 fat hogs at from 12^ to 15^ cents per pound. 

No hogs or cattle were purchased in the United States during the 
year. 



EEPOET OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 139 



Open-market purchases made in addition to the above were as 
follows : 



Item. 


Unit. 


Quantity. 


Price. 


Chickens 


Each 

...do 


2,691 
13S 

1,415 
327J 

7,840 
250 


$0.50 




.60 




...do 


1.75 


Eggs 


Dozen 

Each 

Pound 


.75 




.025 


Coflfee 


.30 




...do 


2,509 


.01i-.03 




...do 


434 

240 

25 

1,090 

09, 230 

76,349 

300 


.05-. 11 




Each 

...do 


1 2.50 




3.00 


Peas 


Pound 

Each 

Pound 

...do 


.04 




.01 




. 15-. 17 




.19 








1 Per dozen. 2 Purchased for health department. 





The steamship Canhhean completed 28 round trips to Colombia 
during the year, bringing to the Canal Zone 11,779 head of beef 
cattle and various other produce. In addition, general cargo, 
passengers, and mail were carried. The total number of passengers 
carried was 376, and the total tonnage of general cargo amounted 
to 4,141.72, including specie valued at $321,056.75. This steamer 
also made two round trips to Corinto, Nicaragua, bringing to the 
Zone 1,101 head of beef cattle. This ship was. placed in dry dock 
for overhauling in September, being replaced by the steamship 
Middlehuni , and remained there until December 31, 1919, sailing for 
Corinto, Nicaragua, on that date. 

The steamship Cvlehra was not in active service during the entire 
year. This ship was placed in dr}^ dock on May 10, 1919, for repairs 
and alterations, and remained there until April of this year, when 
transfer to the dredging division was made. 

The steamship MiclcUehury entered the service of the cattle industry 
division on August 19, 1919, making her initial trip to Colombia on 
that date. During the year 17 round trips were made between 
Cristobal and Cartagena, bringing to the Isthmus 11,451 head of 
beef steers, 4,691 fat hogs, and other miscellaneous cargo, including 
passengers and mail. The total tonnage of general cargo amounted 
to 3,202.07, including specie v-jilued at S338,728.70. A total of 55 
passengers was carried. This boat completed her last voyage on 
January 13, 1920, and was turned back to the United States Shipping 
Board at 7 a. m. on June 14, 1920. 



140 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



The following table shows the monthl}' commercial steamship- 
business: 



Month. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September... 

Optober 

November... 
December. . . 

1920. 

January 

February 

March . .". 

April 

May 

Juiie 

Total. . 



General cargo. 



Tonnage. Revenue 



1,463.80 
606. 54 
879. 32 
848.02 
649.32 
598. 52 



128.05 
302. 34 
395.34 
240.93 
440. 78 
790. 83 



7,343.79 



$11,042.14 
5,3S6.87 
6,417.85 
7,213.59 
4,924.27 
4,908.21 



889. 38 
2,060.92 
3,452.90 
2, 254. 11 
5,258.44 
8,070.57 



61,879.25 



Specie. 



Value. 



$156,500.00 
23,272.00 
132,800.00 
82, 626. 70 
81,760.00 
25,542.00 



21,621.00 



126,084.00 
"9"579.'75' 



659,785.45 



Revenue. 



,075.93 
140.00 
747.01 
464. 78 
534. 24 
164.26 



121.62 



711.66 
"'74.' 76' 



4,034.26 



Mail 
revenue. 



$3.13 
5.90 
1.13 



9.02 
15.73 



7.45 
9.25 
15.08 
7.71 
2.53 
2.26 



79.19 



Passengers. 



Number. Revenue. 



431 



$860.00 
795. 10 
80.00 
260.00 
220.00 
300.00 



1,030.00 

l,3S0.0a 

1,480.00 

305.00 

990.00 



7,700.10 



The total net revenue to conunercial steamship business is as 
follows : 

Generalcargo.net §30,939.62 

Specie 2,017.38 

Mail 79.19 

Passengers 7, 700. 10 

Total 40, 726. 29 



The sales of live stock and poultry during the year were as follows: 





Unit. 


To com- 
missary. 


To indi- 
viduals 
and com- 
panies. 


Beef cattle.. . 


Each.... 
...do.... 


23, 199 

1 

3 

1 

15 


2,012 


Bulls 




Cows 


...do.... 




Calves 


...do 


1 


Pigs 


...do 


1 


Shoats 


...do.... 


104 


Hogs... . .* 


...do 


7,216 
249 
4 
1,124 
5,760 
1,410 
1,602 


12 




...do 


1 


Goats 


...do.... 




Chicks 


...do 


8 


Chickens 


...do 


104 


Turkeys 


...do.... 




D ucks . . 


...do 


3 









The health of all stock in general continued very ^ood throughout 
the year with the exception of tiic epidemic of anthrax, the deaths 
from which exceeded those of last year, there being a total of 326 
head flying from positive anthrax, and 175 among the beef cattle at 
Mount Hope not reported as positive but which were undoubtedly 
anthrax. Eighty-one head died from arsenic poisoning at Caimito 



REPORT OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 141 

during the month of June, 1920, the origin of which has not been 
definitely establishcil to date. 

Among the breeding stock we lost 2 Hereford and 6 Durham bulls 
from tuberculosis and 4 cows from tick fever; among the lean cattle 
12 steers died from tick fever and 117 died from other causes, con- 
sisting of 20 cows and 5 calves in the breeding stock and 92 steers 
among the lean cattle: also 45 head of cows from the dairy stock, 
consisting of 15 Holsteins, which died of tick fever, and 30 native 
cows from other causes. The total losses from all causes amounted 
to 768 head for the year. A total of 38,448 head of cattle were 
handled through the pastures during the year, which gives a loss of 
less than 2 per cent. Considering the anthrax epidemic, which was 
unusually severe, and also that we passed through one of the longest 
and most severe dry seasons known tor j^ears, the loss is considered 
very light. The drought lasted six weeks longer than was expected 
and, due to being overstocked with cattle, the grass became very 
scarce. This necessitated the moving of cattle from place to place 
and careful handling in order not to incur greater losses. 

The health at the Margarita hog farm was comparatively good. 
There was an epidemic of cholera during September which resulted 
in high death rate. The deaths for the year were as follows: 48 pigs, 
240 shoats, 317 hogs, 23 sows, and 4 boars. 

The death rate among the sows at Limon hog ranch was high, 
there being a total of 182. Deaths among the other stock were com- 
paratively light. 

The results of the operation of the Summit poultry farm have not 
improved since our report of last year, and in fact, the outlook is far 
from encouraging. During the year just closed the cost of chicken 
feed, practically all of which has to be imported from the United 
States, has advanced materially, adding greatly to the cost of opera- 
tions. Wliile the actual number of deaths was not as great as last 
year, there has been no decrease in the death rate among the stock. 

PASTURES. 

On April 1, 1920, the pastures on the west side of the Canal were 
consolidated and placed under the direct supervision of one gold 
foreman with headquarters at the new Miraflores camp. This unit 
is now known as the Mandingo-Farfan pastures. 

On the same date the pastures on the east side of the Canal, with 
the exception of the Mount Hope beef pastures and the Mindi dairy- 
pastures, were also consolidated and placed under the direct super- 
vision of one gold foreman, with headquarters at Caimito. This unit 
is now known as the Eastside pastures. This consolidation resulted 
in a considerable reduction in both gold and silver forces and a notable 
decrease in the general pasture operating expenses. 

The total area cleared and devoted to pastures, according to new 
surveys, amounts to 46,155 acres, of which 42,065 acres are com- 
pleted and 4,090 will be completed during the coming six months. 

During the year the sanitary department condemned a number of 
areas, amounting to 5,720 acres. This is a total loss to the cattle 
industry division of $154,440 figured on the basis of $27 per acre. 
This leaves a total of 40,435 acres. 



142 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

The total virgin clearing for the year amounted to 4,090 acres,, 
divided as follows : 

Westside pastures: Acres. 

Gorgona-Mandingo area 1, 669 

Farfan area 856 

Eastside pastures: 

Bohio area 1, 565 

The total area recleared amounted to 31,666 acres, being divided 
as follows: 

Acres. 

Mount Hope area 3, 025 

Eastside pastures: 

Summit 4, 252 

Oaimito - 5, 000 

Bohio 1, 790 

Westside pastures: 

Gorgona-^Iandingo area 6, 252 

New Mandingo 2, 789 

Pedro Miguel 2, 076 

Farfan pastures 6, 482 

Total 31, 666 

Seeding.- — Seventy-six thousand three hundred and forty-nine 
pounds of grass seed were planted in the various pastures during the 
year, principally on the new clearing, although there was a small 
area reseeded. 

Fencing. — Approximately 48 miles of new fence were constructed, 
including corrals, etc., divided as follows: 

Miles. 

Farfan 29 

New Mandingo and Pedro Miguel 14 

Gambo U 

Bohio 1^^ 

Caimito 2 

PLANTATIONS. 

Contracts covering the operation of the following plantations were 
entered into between The Panama Canal and private contractors. 

Braclio Mindi. — Twenty-five acres; contractor, A. Napoleon. 
Contractor receives payment for three-fifths of papaya shipped to 
commissary division; other produce two-thirds. 

Davis Plantation. — Seventy acres; contractor, Thomas James. 
Contractor receives payment for two- thirds of all produce shipped in. 

OhiJihre Plantation. — -Fifty-five acres; contractor, S. McLean. 
Contractor receives payment for two-thirds of all produce shipped in. 

Fnjoles Plantation.— We continued to operate this unit as an 
avocado orchard. However, this orchard suffered to a considerable 
extent due to the extremely dry season of this year. 

Juan Mina Plantation.— The cultivation of the citrus grove con- 
tinued throughout the year and the prospects for an abundant crop 
arc very promising. A good crop of corn was harvested at this unit 
and used for feed at the Limon hog ranch. This plantation has been 
extended to include a branch at the Summit poultry farm. At the 
latter point 1,064 trees have been planted and are growing in good 
shape. 



REPORT OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 143 



Limon Plantation.- — ^This unit was converted into a hog ranch on 
July 1, 1919, and various improvements in the way of fences, pens, 
sheds, etc., were made. The initial shipment of breeding stock con- 
sisted of 289 sows and 9 boars. Report of operations is found else- 
where under Limon hog ranch. Bananas and other miscellaneous; 
items of fruit and vegetables were shipped to the commissary division. 

Las Oascadas Plantation. — ^This plantation remained under con- 
tract with Mr. W. T. Bardy. 

Summit Plantation.— The only plantation operations at this point 
are the Chinese gardens, Nos. 1 and 2. These gardens have made 
splendid yield and the produce turned in to the commissary division. 

The following statement shows items of produce shipped to the 
commissary division from the plantations and Chinese gardens: 



Item. Quantity. 

Akee, each 522 

Bauanas, bunches 22, 609 

Beans, string, pounds 71,098 

Beets, pounds 22 

Bread fruit, pounds 4,616 

Cabbage, pounds 49 

Cane, sugar, sticks 2,072 

Cocoanuts, each 4, S34 

Celery, bunches 32, 866 

Corn, green, ears 2,710 

Coco beans, pounds 1, 001 

Cucumbers, pounds 178,249 

Egg plant, pounds 95, 524 

Endive, pounds 62, 567 

Ginger, pounds 657 

Grapefruit, each 9, 248 

Lettuce, pounds 60, 223 

Lemons, each 5, 483 

Limos, each 53, 503 

Mangoes, each 57, 951 

Melons, pounds 270 

Mint, bunches 80,491 



Item. Quantity, 

Mustard, pounds 20, 771 

Okra, pounds 31,046 

Oranges, each 140, 25a 

Onions, green, bimches 145,271 

Papaya, pounds 161,897 

Pears, alligator 4,821 

Parsley, bunches 142, 661 

Peppers, creen, pounds 34,417 

Peppers, hot 2,004 

Peppers, sweet 3, 431 

Plantain, each 32, 548 

Peanuts, pounds 35 

Pineapples, each 3, 299 

Pumpkins, pounds 77 

Radishes, red, bunches 115,975 

Radishes, white, bunches 40,929 

Spinach, pounds 140, 560 

Squash, pounds 6, 211 

Tomatoes, pounds 14, 269 

Turnips, pounds 385 

Tarda, poimds 1, 20O 

Yucca, pounds 8, 260 



POULTRY FARM, 

The egg production for the year amounted t© 7,535^^ dozen hen 
and 497y^ dozen duck eggs, of which 5,339x\ dozen hen eggs were 
sent to the commissary; also 32y\ dozen duck eggs and 2,061^ dozen 
hen eggs sent to incubator and 62y2^ dozen hen eggs were sold to 
individuals. 

DAIRY FARM. 

The total milk production at the dairy farm amounted to 92,765^ 
gallons, of which 79,458i were sent to the commissary along with 
6,911^ gallons of cream, and the balance of 11,994 gallons of milk 
was fed to calves. 

Respectfully submitted. 

R. K. Morris, 

Chief Quartermaster. 
Brig. Gen. Chester Harding, United States Army, 

Governor, The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. 



144 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 1. — Occupants of Panama Cane I and Panama Railroad quarters. June SOi 

1920. 







Gold. 




Europeans. 


West Indians. 


Place. 


Men. 


Wo- 
men. 


Chil- 
dren. 


Men. 


Wo- 
men. 


Chil- 
dren. 


Men. 


Wo- 
men. 


Chil- 
dren. 




805 

1,210 

14 

303 

6 

9 

24 

200 

1,270 


607 

727 

12 

190 

5 

5 

11 

171 

488 


482 

1,068 

6 

212 

"ll 

1 

10 

223 

540 








110 

761 

48 

8 529 

.^49 

6 122 

M69 

654 

9 1,832 


18 
403 

14 
315 
206 

77 

57 
395 
385 


12 


Balboa' 


16 


12 


17 


842 




2 




i 

42 
108 


1 

11 
70 


4 

27 
158 


583 




471 


■Ciilelira * 


174 




79 










627 




80 


ii 


11 


857 






Total 


3,841 


2,216 


2,553 


247 


97 


206 


4,574 


1,870 


3 647 







1 Includes Talo ?eco and qriarantine station. 

2 Includes -\rirat)ores and Red Tank. 

3 Includes 63 Panamanians. 
•< Includes Empire. 

6 Includes 37 Panamanians. 

« Includes Summit. 

' Includes 70 Panamanians. 

6 Includes Colon Beach and Colon Hospital. 

» Includes 637 Panamanians, 12 East Indians, and 6 colored Americans. 

Table No. 2. — Applications for family quarters on file June 30, 1920. 



stations. 



Number. 



D. Q. M., Balboa Heights 
D. Q. M., Pedro Mienel... 

D. Q. M., Gatun 

D. Q. M., Cristobal 

Total 



266 

40 

124 

188 



618 



Table No. 3. — Sales. 





fieneral 
storehouse. 


Cristobal 
storehouse. 


Paraiso 
storehouse. 


Total. 


Number of local sales 


9,279 

1,495 

49,061 


7,091 

1,770 

25, 189 


1,701 


18 071 




3 265 




97 


74 ?(47 






Total 


59,835 


34,0.50 


1,798 


95,683 




Value of local sales ' 


$131,975.58 

526,926.72 

1,036,555.66 


8101,512.00 
747,629.46 
475, 076. .59 


$4,332.24 


$237,819.82 
1 ■'74 556 18 




Value of credit sales ' 


1,689.93 


1 513 322 18 






Total 


1,695,457.96 


1,323,918.05 


6,022.17 


3,025,698.18 





< Includes fuel oil sold locallv as follows: Balboa, $47,723.36; Cristobal, $2,845.10. 
2 Includes fuel oil sold to steamships as follows: Balboa, $387,328.99; Oistobal, $''i62,361.72. 
' Includes material i.ssued on foreinan'.s orders to Armv, -Navy, etc., and for work on individuals' and 
companies' jobs: General storehouse, $556,206.92; Cristobal storehouse, $144,829.97: total, $701,036.89. 



EEPOET OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 145 



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146 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



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EEPOBT OF CHIEF QUAETERMASTER, SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 147 

Table No. 5. — Sales of obsolete and scrap material and equipment, July 1, 1919, to 
June SO, 1920, the original cost of which amounted to more than ^500, 



Bills, 
Sale No. 



Name of purchaser. 



Article sold. 



Sale 
value. 



365.. 
742.. 
767.. 
818.. 
827.. 
865.. 
886.. 
956.. 
1243. 
1298. 
1351. 
1387. 
1700. 
1788.1 
1850.! 
2081.1 
6581.! 
7667.! 
8031. 



A. M. Loeb, 
Pinel Bros 
J. O. Codar 
A. I.evingston 
Rodolfo Chiari 
Thompson & Daly 

do 

La Veloce Navigazione Italiana a 
Vapore. 

A. Levingston 

Capt. C. EllLson 

F. .\ . Scherberg 

L. Martinez 

W. S. Perry 

John Hilbert 

C. A.. Dady 

Edward R. Japs 

C. A. Nelson 

S. P. Santos 

J. B. Pintt 

F. Y. Thompson 

Fuerza y Luz Co 

Pinel Bros 

S. P. Santos 

do 

do 

American Trade Development Co. . 
Thos. R . Lombard 



B.S. 8047. H. Baxter. 



25.75 net tons mixed scrap 

12 net tons mixed scrap 

Motor, gasoline, 90 horsepower, No. K. G. 807.. 

2 tanks, B. I 5,776 gallons capacity 

Generator, Uoods, 2i H. W 

48,200 pounds scrap iron 

Barge, steel, coal. No. 56 

20 tons rail 



Crane, Loco, 20 tons. No. 44 

Boat, tug Chame, W. property 

22,300 pounds miscellaneous scrap 

17,500 pounds charmels and I-beams 

18 tons scrap iron 

37,400 pounds mL=cellaneous scrap iron 

41,900 poimds mixed scrap 

10 tons angles 

52,800 pounds scrap iron 

17,970 pounds miscellaneous scrap iron 

Scale, track, Fairbanks No. 108 

12,540 pounds miscellaneous scrap 

8 transformers 

21,200 pounds scrap iron 

Tractor, Moline 

16,489 tons scrap 

48,000 pounds scrap pipe 

9,279 feet b. m. second-hand native lumber.. 
300 drums, oil, liglit, from "Marne" and 

"Olockson." 
210 drums, oil, light, from "Marne" and 

"Olockson." 



$515. 00 
240.00 
350.00 
300. 00 
300. 00 
482. 00 
150. 00 
600. 00 

2, 500. 00 
15, 350. 00 
223. 00 
262. 50 
360. 00 
374. 00 
419. 40 
200.00 
528. 00 
179. 70 
350. 00 
188. 10 
432. 75 
318. 00 
400. 00 
K'i. 67 
587.00 
510. 35 
600. 00 

120. 00 



Table No. 6. — Houses, apartments, and occupants, by districts, of gold and silver 
quarters, as of June SO, 1920. 



Districts. 



Gold. 



Family. Bachelor. 



Silver. 



Family. Bachelor 



Total. 



Family. 



Bachelor. 



/Vncon-Balboa: 

Houses occupied 

Rooms or apartments 
Number of occupants, 

Corozal: 

Houses occupied 

Rooms or apartments 
Number of occupants , 

Pedro Miguel- Paraiso: 

Jlouses occupied 

Rooms or apartments 
Number of occupants . 

Culebra-Empire : 

Houses occupied 

Tlonms or apartments 
Niunber of occupanis. 

Gamboa-Summit : 

Houses occupied 

Rooms or apartments 
Number of occupants , 

Gatun: 

Houses occupied 

Rooms or apartments 
Number of occupants . 

Cristobal: 

Houses occupied 

Rooms or apartments 
Number of occupants. 

Total: 

Houses occupied 

Rooms or apartments 
Number of occupants . 



465 
1,065 
3,715 

9 
11 
24 

97 
188 
596 

9 
10 
11 

6 
12 
32 

59 
164 
550 

161 

440 

1,392 

809 
1,890 
6,320 



44 

806 

1,058 

3 
3 

8 

9 
89 
114 

2 
2 

4 

3 
11 
13 

12 
42 
44 

27 
458 

776 

100 
1,411 
2.017 



58 

436 

1,655 

1 

2 



100 

600 

2,160 

35 
126 
328 

13 

69 
193 

62 

415 

1,428 

71 

389 

1,646 

340 
2,037 
7,416 



34 
162 
475 

3 

17 

58 

14 
117 
3S5 

3 

5 

45 

5 
27 
112 

11 
122 
248 

34 

117 

1,792 

104 

567 

3,115 



523 
1,501 
5,370 

10 
13 
30 

197 

788 

2,756 

44 
136 
339 

19 

81 

225 

121 

579 

1,978 

235 

829 

3, 038 

1,149 
3,927 
13, 736 



78 

968 

1,533 

6 
20 



23 
206 
499 

5 

7 
49 



38 
125 

23 
164 
292 

61 

.Wo 

2,568 

204 
1,978 
5,132 



148 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 7. — Operation of Hotel Tivoli, July 1, 1919, to June SO, 1920. 



Month. 


Supplies 
consumed. 


Salaries 
and wages. 


Miscel- 
laneous 
expenses. 


Total cost 
of opera- 
tion. 


Revenue. 


Surplus. 


Deficit. 


1919. 
Julv 


$6,6,50.98 
6,439.37 
5,361.40 
6,649.14 
6,670.38 
7,541.33 

8,290.20 
8,976.50 
8,985.62 
7,915.39 
9,209.17 
6,006.97 


$3,394.97 
3,328.46 
3,251.99 
3,411.83 
?,423.75 
3,608.43 

3,713.21 
3,663.34 
4,300.69 
4,477.97 
4,205.80 
4,010.97 


$3,461.28 
4,147.35 
4,011.84 
6,360.32 
4,2S8.85 
3,932.85 

5,108.03 
4,826.52 
7, 270. 01 
4,223.17 
5,001.87 
4,487.93 


$13,507.23 
13,915.18 
12,625.23 
16,421;29 
14,382.98 
15,0S2.61 

17,111.44 
17,466.36 
20,556.32 
16,616.53 
18,416.84 
14,505.87 


$14,264.30 
12,637.15 
11,942.35 
12, 766. 45 
14,489.10 
14,402.05 

20,848.10 
25,697.75 
26,642.00 
20, 309. ,55 
20,492.30 
11,880.25 


$757.07 




Autust 


$1,278.03 
6S2.88 


September... 




October 




3,654.84 


November 


106. 12 

3,736.66 
8,231.39 
6,085.68 
3,693.02 
2,075.46 


December 

1920. 
January 


680. 56 


February 




March 




April 




May 




June 


2, 625. 62 








Total 


88,696.45 


44,791.41 


57,120.02 


190,607.88 


206,371.35 


24,685.40 


8,921.93 



Net surplus, $15,763.47. 

Table No. 7A. — Summary of operations, Hotel Aspinwall, July 1, 1919, to June SO, 

1920. 



Month. 


SuppUes 
consumed. 


Salaries 
and wages. 


Miscel- 
laneous 
expenses. 


Total cost 
of opera- 
tion. 


Revenue. 


Surplus. 


Deficit. 


1919. 
July 


$967. 93 
1,887. .53 
2,316.09 
1,352.10 
1,730.75 
1,510.67 

1,37.5.46 
1,831.48 
2,263.42 
2,298.12 
2,906.61 
2,292.02 


$981.81 
1,113.96 
1,204.69 
1,160.77 
1,109.99 
1,028.65 

1,019.53 
1,191.05 
1,532.97 
1,763.33 
1,. 534. 85 
1,408.91 


$977.99 
1,. 521. 01 

656. 00 
1,113.37 
1,130.63 

980.22 

1,169. .51 
1,237.70 
1,. 569. 62 
1,644.14 
1,834.92 
1,711.53 


$2,927.73 
4,522.50 
4,176.78 
3,626.24 
3,971.37 
3, .51 9. ,54 

3,. 564. .50 
4,260.23 
5,366.01 
5,705.59 
6,276.38 
5, 412. 46 


$2,298.37 
4,473.75 
.5,015.33 
2,314.85 
3,628.29 
2,680.70 

2,798.61 
4,228.93 
.5,410.88 
4,471.42 
5,286.51 
3,958.40 




$629. 36 


August 




48.75 


September 

October 


$838.55 




i,3ii.39 






343. 08 






838.84 


1920. 
January 




765. 89 






31.30 




44.87 






1,234.17 






989. 87 






1,454.06 








Total 


22, 732. 18 


15, 050. 51 


15,546.64 


53,329.33 


46,566.04 


883.42 


7,646.71 



Net deficit, $6,763.29. 
Table No. 8. — Summary of operations of restaurants, July 1, 1919, to June SO, 1920. 



Month. 


Supplies 
consumed. 


Salaries 
and wages. 


Miscel- 
laneous 
expenses. 


Total cost 
of opera- 
tion. 


Revenue. 


Surplus. 


Deficit. 


1919. 
July. . 


$41,841.16 
38,821.64 
37,652.55 
37,-524.61 
36,041.04 
37, 414. 71 

43,220.80 
40,476.28 
4.5,633.45 
4-5,176.78 
44,917.34 
46,518.93 


$10,911.01 
10,403.17 
10,407.45 
10,343.44 
10,266.67 
10,315.81 

10,402.41 
10,996.49 
13,862.47 
12, 325. ,58 
12,310.46 
12, 148. 08 


$4,1.50.62 
5, 145. 55 
4, 085. 53 
3, 925. 13 
4,192.50 
4,135.49 

4,051.46 
4, OSO. 97 
4,863.62 
3,833.68 
4, 391.. 59 
6, 176. 64 


$56,902.79 
54,370.36 
,52,145.53 
51,793.18 
50, 500. 21 
51,866.01 

.57,674.67 
.5.5,-5.53.74 
64, 3.59. .54 
61,336.01 
61,619.39 
64,813.05 


$.5,5,715.29 
53,404.98 
,50,668.53 
51,963.57 
50,336.98 
54, 124. 21 

.56,804.41 
,58,8.57.30 
61,222.85 
62, 206. ,52 
61,012.74 
61,.S61.S9 




$1,187.50 
%5.38 






September 




1,477.00 


$170.39 






163.23 




2,258.20 




1920. 


870.26 




3,303.56 






3,136.69 




870. 48 




May. 


.576.65 






2,981.76 








Total 


495,239.29 


134,693.01 


53,032.78 


682,965.11 


678,209.27 


6,602.63 


11,358.47 



Deficit $4,755.84 

Indirect expense (not charged) 27, 917. 24 

Total 32,673.08 

Net surplus on messes— see Table No. 9 ^, 516. 57 

Net deficit on restaurants and laborers' mosses if indirect charges for building repairs, fuel, 

light, etc., had been made 27, 156. 51 

Above statement includes services for departments and di\ isions of The Panama Canal. 



KEPORT OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 149 
Table No. 9. — Summary of operations, laborers' messes, July 1, 1919, to June SO, 1920. 



Month. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November. . 
December.. 



1920. 

January 

February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Total. 



Supplies I Salaries 
consumed. I and wages. 



$11,831.71 
11,575.12 
10,625.26 
10,407.07 
9,037.42 
10,568.76 



10,385.17 

15,564.73 

17,798.14 

8,657.85 

7,527.32 

7. 232. 35 



131,210.90 



$1,701.16 
1,734.35 
1,664.71 
1,665.48 
1,657.51 
1,576.25 



1,. 582. 22 
1,618.21 
3, 292. 77 
1,717.62 
1,657.11 
1,590.80 



Miscel- 
laneous 
expenses. 



$1, 464. 45 
1,717.60 
1,461.24 
1,276.35 
1,523.15 
1,164.10 



1,060. .59 
897. 03 

1,627.40 
962. 72 

1,248.13 

1,968.86 



21,458.19 16,371.62 



Total cost 
of opera- 
tion. 



$14,997.32 
15,027.07 
13,751.21 
13,348.90 
12,218.08 
13,309.11 



13,027.98 
18,079.97 
22,718.31 
11,338.19 
10,432.56 
10,792.01 



169,040.71 



Revenue. 



$15,411.40 
15, 165. 78 
13,900.98 
14,108.25 
11,975.96 
14,265.63 



13,513.29 
13,245.82 
31,596.22 
11,894.52 
9,946.70 
9. .532. 73 



174, .557. 28 



Surplus. 



$414. 08 
138. 71 
149. 77 
759.35 



956. 52 



485. 31 



8,877.91 
556.33 



Deficit. 



$242.12 



4,834.15 



485.86 
1,259.28 



6,821.41 



Net surplus, $5,516.57. 

Table No. 10. — Obsolete and surplus material (appraised values). 

On hand July 1, 1919 $161, 472. 69 

Received during fiscal year 1920 114, 385. 46 

Total 275, 858. 15 

Account sales over appraised values, issues R. F. S., etc 71, 382. 95 

Total 347,241.10 

Shipped to United States $41, 761. 22 

Sales 119, 132. 23 

Transfers and issues 130, 334. 19 

Surveyed and scrapped 5, 195. 00 

296,422.64 



Balance to account for June 30, 1920 50, 818. 46 

Table No. 11. — American scrap operations. 



American and shop scrap. 


$5 net ton. 


$7 net ton. 


Total. 


Tons. 


Value. 


Tons. 


Value. 


Tons. 


Value. 


On hand July 1, 1919 


17,417.968 
6,811.532 


$87,089.84 
34,057.66 


1,980.40 
533.81 


$13,862.80 
3,736.67 


19,398.368 
7,345.342 


$100,952.64 
37 794 33 


Received 






Total to account for 

Issued from July 1, 1919, to 
June 30, 1920 


24,229.500 
18,813.912 


121,147.50 
94,069.56 


2, 514. 21 
2,214.23 


17,599.47 
15,499.61 


26,743.710 
21,028.142 


138,746.97 
109,569.17 




Balance on hand June 
30,1920 


5,415.588 


27,077.94 


299.98 


2,099.86 


5,714.568 


29 177 80 







Table No. 12. — Fuel oil handled. 





Balboa. 


Mount 
Hope. 


Total. 


Number of barrels received bv The Panama Canal 


426,541 
290, 376 
508, 326 
269,699 
23,005 


454,628 

76,420 

3,150,967 

394,376 
26,648 


881 169 


Number of barrels used bv The Panama Canal 


366' 796 


Number of barrels pumped for individuals and companies 


3, 659' 293 
664 076 


Number of barrels sold by The Panama Canal 


Number of barrels representing miscellaneous transfers on tank farm. 


49^653 


Total 


1,517 947 ! a in.^ mo 


5 620 986 


Number of ships handled, including Panama Canal craft 


347 


848 


1 196 







150 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 13. — Comparative statement of output of manufacturing plants, commissary 
division, supply department, fiscal years 1916 to 1920. 



1916 



1917 



1918 



1919 



1920 



Laundry (Cristobal): 

Total number of pieces han- 
dled 

Value of output 

Laundry (Ancon): 

Tola] number of pieces han- 
dled 

Value of output 

Bakery 

Total output— Bread, loaves 
Total output— rolls, each. . . . 
Total output— cakes, pounds. 
Total output— doughnuts, 

dozen 

Total output— pies, each 

Total output— soda crack- 
ers, pounds 

Value of output 

CofTee roasting: 

Roasted coffee produced, 

pounds 

Value of output 

Ice manufacturing: 

Ice manufactured, tons 

Value of output 

Icecream plant: 

Ice cream manufactured, gal- 
lons 

Milk bottled, quarts 

Cream bottled, quarts 

Value of output 

Sau-^age factory and pickling de- 
partment: 
Cornedbeefproduced,pounds. 
namburger steak produced, 

pounds 

Home-made sausage pro- 
duced, pounds 

Corn pork produced, pounds. 
Tongue produced, pounds . . . 

Bacon smoked, pounds 

nam, smoked, pounds 

Miscellaneous sausage pro- 
duced, pounds 

Shoulder, smoked, pounds... 

B eef, smoked , pounds 

Ham, boiled, pounds 

Shoulder, boiled, pounds 

Value of output 

Industrial Laboratory; 

\'alue of output 

Abattoir: 

Cattle killed, head 

Hogs killed, each 

Chickens, turkeys, ducks, 

etc. , killed, each 

Weight of dressed beef pro- 
duced, pounds , 

Weight of dressed hogs pro- 
duced, pounds 

Value of output 

Total value of output 



3,970,674 
S94,719.68 



4,509,308 
S98, 242. 83 

6, 385, 546 

1,093,792 

140, 477 

50,982 
19,019 



3,649,814 
S91, 722. 87 



4,094,273 
$93,262.51 

7,211,417 

1,129,400 

132,493 

54,840 
28, 559 



3,341,613 
$87,271.73 



5,642,383 
$132,047.11 

7,504,920 

637,656 

81,386 

38,075 
48,357 



$297,439.63 



381,630 
$83,535.69 



39,461 
$230, 834. 69 



167, 528 



$251,880.93 

196, 169 

125,712 

8,553 
2,932 
5,450 



$365,962.92 

427,921 
$94,023.30 

45,044 
$263,507.40 



163,326 

386, 164 

11,697 

$226,024.22 



188, 271 

135, 677 

37,718 
12,027 
12,913 



10,856 



$539, 239. 48 



382,233 
$106,584.48 

48,672 
$282,297.60 



216, 262 

452, 697 

7,809 

$339,926.34 



238, 142 

208, 859 

47,451 
56,687 
9,730 
60,144 
65,208 

240, 521 



$54,969.67 

$116,176.40 

7,762 



$55, 525. 14 

$179,363.56 

13,180 
681 



3,843,377 



$446,882.69 
$1,674,682.11 



7,118,803 

66,999 

$927,551.06 

$2,296,942.98 



$101,516.07 

$275, 682. 50 

21, 731 
11,483 

41,435 

10,788,446 

991,903 
2,025,280.75 
;3, 889, 846. 06 



3,360,443 
$101,746.03 



4,988,676 
$132,033.90 

5,438,121 
234, 624 
131,708 

14,654 



15, 152 
$454,020.16 



336,354 
$96,242.64 

52,513 
$287,537.47 



252,344' 

399,997 

7,710 

$423,623.67 



192,998 

186,005 

67,241 
80, 134 
34,320 
60,669 
61, 137 

288, 846 

12,409 

7,979 

1,822 

2,136 

$275,121.87 

$323, 268. 63 

31,209 
13, 553 

40,031 

15,974,950 

1,327,268 
$3,071,878.15 
$5,165,472.52 



3,481,718 
$124,762.76 



4, 236, 158 
$131, 188. 75 

5,278,213 
274,008 
173,338 

12,278 
46,534 

37, 153 
$492, 226. 86 



273,460 
$99,482.56 

51,266 
$333,456.00 



132,621 

456,639 

12,538 

$320, 252. 34 



123,366 

74,618 

101,292 
29,196 
39, 193 
50, 762 
53,492 

382, 748 
29,956 
25,773 



$221,781.57 
$347,508.07 

23,199 

7,565 

9,900 

11,335,120 

687, 633 
$2,315,246.47 
$4,385,905.38 



REPOET OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 151 

Table No. 14. — Quantities of certain staple articles purchased during the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1920, as compared with the previous year. 



Unit. 



Quantity. 



1919 



1920 



Groceries and meats: 

Beef, natise 

Butter 

Coffee 

Com 

Cured and pickled meats 

Eggs ■- 

Fish, canned 

Flour 

Fresh meats 

Hogs 

Milk, evaporated and condensed. 

Milk, fresh 

Rice 

Sugar 

Tomatoes in tins 

Fresh vegetables: 

Cabbage 

Onions 

Potatoes 

Yams 

Fresh fruits: 

Applet 

Grapefruit 

Oranges 



Pounds... 

...do. 

..do 

...do 

...do 

Do?en 

Pounds . . . 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

Gallons . . . 
Pounds . . . 

...do 

...do 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



...do... 
Each.. 
Dozen. 



,361,885 

481, 126 

177,217 

440,770 

145,410 

971,243 

114,638 

,614,491 

159, 678 

,853,493 

,008,280 

138,675 

,666,753 

,147,754 

469,000 

977,570 
884,858 
,713,534 
685, 145 

706,989 
200,814 
215,014 



20,791,217 
485,142 
272, 214 
108,711 
406,853 
601,237 
618,707 

6,696,498 
424,375 
925,716 

2,755,624 
165,749 

2,924,650 

4,343,294 
402, 116 

1,090,467 
752,667 

6,232,079 
292,260 

767,845 
116,010 
125,189 



Table No. 15. — Comparative selling prices for June 30, 1920, as against June 30, 1919. 



Unit. 



Prices. 



Fresh meats: 

Beef, stew (native) Pound. . 

Reef, chuck roast, 3 pounds and over (native) doi.... 

Beef, rib roast, not under 3 pounds (nativie) do 

Beef, rump roast (Special) I... do 

Beef, rump roast (nati\ e) [ . . .do 

Beefsteak, sirloin (s oecial) .do 

Beefsteak, sirloin (native) 1 . . .do 

"' .do.... 

.do.... 

.do.... 

.do.... 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 

.do. 



..do... 
Dozen. 



Pound. 
...do... 



Mutton, loin chops 

Pork, hams. fresh 

Pork, loin chops , 

Veal, loin chons 

Cured and pickled meats: 

Bacon, States, breakfast, whole piece. . 

Ham, sugar-cured, States, whole piece. 

Bacon, breakfast, native, whole piece. 

Ham, sugar-cured, native, whole piece 
Poultry and game: 

Chickens, corn-fed , 

Dairy products: 

Butter, creamery, s pecial , 

Eggs, fresh ." , 

Fish: 

Codfish, dried , 

Fish, fresh (native) 

Vegetables: 

Onions 

Potatoes, white 

Fruits, fresh: 

.\ poles 

Crockeries: 

Beans, navy, dried 

Coffee, ground. No. 1 

Corn, susiar 

Flour , 

Lard, compound 

Milk, evaporated 

Peas, extrasifted 

■Rice [ Pound . . 

Soap, laundry Cake 

Sugar, granulated Sacks, 5s 

Tomatoes I Tins, 3s. 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 



..do 

..do 

Tins, 2s. 
Poimd . . . 

..do 

Tins, Is. 
Tins, 2s. 



.18 



.18 
.47 
.32 
.45 
.49 

.55 
.50 
.38 
.35 

.53 

.64 
.56 

.20 
.13 

.10 
.03V 



.20 



.20 
.51 
.46 
.50 
.61 

.61 
.47 
.54 



.57 



.10 
.31 
.16 
.07 
.32 
.15 
.16 
.13 
.09 
.85 
.24 



152 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 16. — Articles purchased by the products buyer in Costa Rica during period 
from June SO, 1919, to June SO, 1920. 



Article. 


Unit. 


Quantity. 


Amount. 


Beets 


Pound.... 
...do 


4,167 

191,682 

34,263 

99,319 

257, 787 

31,465 

102,796 

2,547,666 

2,029,400' 

2,608 

47,844 


?58. 44 




3,830.94 


Carrots 


..do 


448. 85 


G rape fruit 


Each 

...do 


2,470.19 
4,874.62 


Oranges, select 


Orankes, tropical 


.do 


138. 02 




Pound 

...do 


1,630.51 
43, 412. 69 


Potatoes, white 


Sucar 


..do 


195 973.90 




...do 


121. 65 




...do 


643. 14 








Total value 




253,602,95 









Table No. 17. — More important articles purchased in Haiti during period from June 

30, 1919, to June SO, 1920. 

None. (Agency discontinued.) 

List of the important articles ^ purchased locally ,^ from plantations of the cattle industry,^ 
from Corozal farm and Army truck gardens, from local producers and importing agen- 
cies, and hy the local commissary buyer, Panama. 



Unit. 



Quantity. 



1919 



1920 



Bananas 

Do 

Beans 

Celery 

Cocoanuts 

Com, green 

Cream 

Cucumbers 

Eg?s, fresh 

Fish 

Ho-s 

Lettuce 

Limes 

Macaroni 

Mangoes 

Milk 

Onions, green... 

Oranges 

Papaya 

Parsley 

Pears, alligator. 

Pineapples 

Plantains 

Potatoes, sweet. 

Radishes 

Rice 

Spinach 

Do 

Soap 

Squash 

Sugar 

Tomatoes 

Yams 



Bunches . 
Dozens... 
Poimds . . 
Bunches . 

Dry 

Ears 

Gallons.. 
Pounds . - 
Dozens... 
Pounds . . 

...do 

...do 

Each 

Pounds . . 



Gallons.. 
Bimches . 

Each 

Pounds . . 
Bunches . 

Each 

..do 

..do 

Pounds . . 
Bunches. 
Pounds . . 
Bunches. 
Pounds.. 

Bars 

Pounds.. 

..do 

..do 

..do 



28,044 
16,868 
70,570 
41,703 

184,630 

180, 115 
3,0.56 

117,275 
30, 161 

448,299 

853,493 
62,666 

562,364 
35,850 

267,211 
50,906 

203, 197 
1,617,8.50 

235,9.35 

103, 691 
72,316 
58,198 

320,779 

215,397 
93,895 

906,415 
76,908 
42,858 
51,890 

112,578 

1,740,022 

54,494 

898,329 



33, 630 

2,205 

29,784 

46,042 

135,573 

127,515 

10,059 

194,094 

6,951 

429,690 

925,716 

74,692 

444,982 

92,365 

234,542 

92,849 

193, 266 

261,527 

162,981 

167,142 

54,873 

48,693 

1,318,804 

9,155 

150, 884 

1,930,400 

6,156 

15,938 

5,820 

86,660 

1,906,991 

20,676 

292,260 



• Tn addition to the products listed, various purchases were made of fruits and vegetaMcs in season and 
of different commoiities, including chayotes, guaves, dasheen, egg plant, endive, mint, okra, peppers, and 
cow peas. 

» Total value of all local purchases was 5?630,10S.6n. 

• Detail of all supplies recci\ ed from Panama Canal pastures, plantations, hog and poultry farms, etc., 
will be included in the report of the cattle industry. 



APPENDIX E. 

REPORT OF THE AUDITOR IN CHARGE OF THE ACCOUNTINa 

DEPARTMENT. 



Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, 

September 7, 1920. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of transac- 
tions of the accounting department for the fiscal year ended June 
30, 1920: 

organization. 

The following are the important changes in the personnel of the 
department that took place during the year: Mr. T. L. Clear, after 
serving for about a year overseas in the Inspector General's Depart- 
ment of the Army, returned during September, 1919, and resumed his 
duties as collector of The Panama Canal, Mr. E. P. Sine resigning. 
Mr. A. H. Mohr was appointed deputy collector upon his return from 
Army service, succeeding Mr. T. F. Roth. Mr. J. H. McLean, pay- 
master, resigned November 15, 1919, Mr. R. W. Glaw, assistant 
paymaster, being promoted to the position of paymaster on January 
24, 1920. On the same date Mr. C. L. Bryan was appointed assistant 
paymaster. Judge B. F. Harrah has continued as assistant auditor 
in charge of the office of the accounting department in Washington, 
D. C, while Mr. A. C. Whitton succeeded Mr. H. P. Merrill as dis- 
bursing clerk when the latter resigned in July, 1919. 

PAYMASTER. 

Disbursements to the amount of S38,426,733.29 were made during 
the year by the paymaster. Of this amount the sum of S15,134,- 
762 was on account of the Panama Railroad Company. Employees 
on the gold roll of The Panama Canal were paid $8,391,066.16, and 
those on the silver roll $6,505,810.88, while the sum of $8,395,094.25 
was paid on miscellaneous vouchers. Collections on the pay rolls 
amounted to $5,191,946.43. Of this amount the sum of $4,220,- 
524.88 was collected for coupon books, the remainder being for mis- 
cellaneous items. Of the total collections on pay rolls the sum of 
$4,948,704.48 was disbursed directly by the paymaster, Panama 
Canal, the balance, $243,241.95, being transferred to the collector's 
accounts. The American Foreign Banking Corporation was con- 
tinued as a Government depository, and the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany also opened an account with the International Banking Corpo- 
ration. During the year the sum of $8,820,072, Panama Railroad 
funds, was transferred to the treasurer, New York. This amount 
includes $666,072 mutilated currency, due to rapid deterioration of 
paper money through climatic conditions. The cash situation on the 
Isthmus improved somewhat. The sum of $1,224,000 was brought 
by the paymaster from the States during the year. (See Table 
No. 29). 

153 



154 THE PANAMA CAI^AL. 

COLLECTOR. 

The collections repaid to appropriations amounted to $14,745,- 
■634.31, as compared with $10,364,875.07 collected during the prior 
year. The sum of $8,848,978.06 was collected for deposit as mis- 
cellaneous receipts. Of these amounts there was received by the 
disbursing clerk at Washington the sum of $1,486,112.16 as a credit 
to appropriations, while $83,109.29 were collected as miscellaneous 
receipts. Deposits for the payment of tolls and bills for supplies 
and services were made with assistant treasurers of the United 
States to the credit of the collector in the sum of $2,287,783.21. 
Similar deposits were made with the collector on the Isthmus in the 
sum of $18,631,811.32. The deposits with assistant treasurers show a 
reduction as compared with the previous year of over $2,000,000, 
while the deposits on the Isthmus increased over $6,500,000. Of the 
total deposits, $20,919,594.53, which is $4,476,220.50 in excess of 
last year's total, the sum of $455,251.87 was refunded upon settle- 
ment of accounts. Money-order funds to the amount of $1,501,000 
were transferred to the Postmaster General of the United States 
in payment of money orders drawn on the United States. Other 
■disbursements of miscellaneous funds to the amount of $367,473.46 
were made by the collector. Collections were also made on account 
of the Panama Railroad Company in the sum of $21,532,848.43, an 
increase from last year of $1,991,903.47. (See Tables Nos. 32, 33, 
34, and 40). 

TOLLS. 

Tolls actually collected on vessels transiting the Canal during the 
year amounted to $8,496,633.40. In addition, the sum of $14,003.42 
was collected for vessels that passed through the Canal during prior 
fiscal years, making the total amount collected $8,510,636.82. Tolls 
earned amounted to $8,516,469.80. Of this, the sum of $19,836.40 
was unpaid, being mainly charges on certain Government-operated 
vessels that may not be finally held liable for tolls. In addition, 
there remains unpaid from previous years the sum of $20,711.08. 
The total differs from the amount shown on the operation and main- 
tenance statement by the amount of refunds, account of overcharges 
during prior years ($10,948.49). Under the ruling of the Attorney 
General, tolls on vessels with cargo or passengers are collected in 
accordance with the Panama -Canal rules of measurement only in 
cases where the amount derived by multiplying the Panama Canal 
net tonnage by $1.20 per ton is less than the amount ascertained by 
using the rate of $1.25 and the net registered tonnage as defined by 
United States statutes. Had Panama Canal rules been applied 
in all cases the sum of $9,955,754.32 would have been collected. 
The limitation, therefore, resulted in a loss to the Panama Canal 
during the past fiscal year of $1,445,117.50, as compared with a loss 
of $867,526.48 in 1919, $1,083,111.69 in 1918, $1,034,001.88 in 
1917, and $390,714.05 in 1916, or a loss to the Canal since the de- 
cision of the Attorney General was applied of $4,820,471.60. This 
amount, plus the sum of $10,948.49, which was the amount refunded 
during the year under the authority of the act of Congress of June 
12, 1917, and $214,951.12 refunded during previous years on account 
of the erroneous collections made prior to the ruling of the Attorney 



EEPORT OF AUDITOR. 155 

General, and approximately $63,533.03 still to be refunded, gives 
the total loss to the Canal and the United States Government as 
$5,109,904.24. Vessels of American and foreign register have 
benefited since the opening of the Canal, under the rules of meas- 
ui'ement now in force, as follows : 

American vessels plying between American ports .$237, 956. 85 

Foreign vessels phdng between American ports 67, 881. 50 

American vessels plying between American ports and Canal ports 97, 956. 05 

Foreign vessels pljang betw^een American ports and Canal ports 1, 325. 90 

American vessels plying between American possessions and American 

ports 34, 908. 60 

Foreign vessels plying between American possessions and American 

ports 43, 495. 75 

The total saving in payment of tolls on all vessels engaged in 
American trade, as above defined, was $483,524.65. Of this total, 
$57,955.20 consisted of deck loads, $56,864.40 of which were carried 
l^y American vessels and $1,090.80 by foreign vessels. Vessels 
engaged in foreign trade, and especially vessels under foreign registry, 
have been the beneficiaries at a time when the United States has 
needed revenue from every legitimate source. 

ACCOUNTING TO THE TREASURY FOR COLLECTIONS. 

No examination of the collection accounts was made by employees 
from the offices of the Auditor for the War Department and the 
Comptroller of the Treasury as contemplated by section 3 of the 
sundry civil act approved March 3, 1915. 

CANAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

The Congress to June 30, 1920, appropriated for the Canal and 
fortifications thereof a total of $467,431,257.41. Of this amount 
$34,658,400.81 was for fortifications, $2,250,000 to cover nine annual 
payments of $250,000 each to the Republic of Panama for Canal 
Zone rights, and $170,000 for regulating commerce and for the censor- 
ship of foreign mail during the fiscal year 1919. The sum of 
$43,997,755.68 has been specifically appropriated for the operation 
and maintenance, sanitation, and civil government of The Panama 
Canal and Canal Zone. Of the amounts appropriated other than 
specifically for operation and maintenance, the sum of $4,289,159 
was charged against operation and maintenance to the end of the 
fiscal year 1915, while $2,225,000 of the general appropriations for 
construction have been used under proper authority to pay for a 
part of the stock of material and supplies for the operation and 
maintenance of the Canal. Deducting from the total appropriations 
the amount appropriated for fortifications $34,658,400.81; for 
Panama, $2,250,000; for regulating commerce and censorship of 
mails, $170,000; for operation and maintenance (including the 
amount of the stock of material and supplies), $50,511,914.68, leaves 
$379,840,941.92 appropriated for the construction of the Canal and 
its immediate adjuncts. This includes the appropriation for pre- 
senting the launch Louise to the French Government as a general 
expense of the construction of the Canal. Of the total appropriated 
for construction, $4,329,898 for colliers and coal barges, $2,093,190 
for pier No. 6, Cristobal, $300,000 for work on the colliers Ulysses 



156 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

and AcJiilles, and $720,000 for reboilering and repairing the steam- 
ships Ancon and Crisiohal, were specifically exempted by law as a 
charge against the amount of the authorized bond issue. The sum 
of $372,397,853.92 is left chargeable against the bond issue. The 
balance available for appropriation within the limit of the cost of 
the Canal and the authorized bond issue is $2,825,302.08, the actual 
difference between the amount appropriated and the items which are 
exempted as a charge against the bond issue being increased by the 
appraised value of the American Legation Building, Panama, $22,256, 
which was transferred to the Department of State. The amount 
appropriated for the support of the Canal during the fiscal year 1920, 
$9,281,851 is not included in the above figures. 

Miscellaneous receipts to June 30, 1920, amounted to $42,176,261.22. 
Deducting tolls, $33,303,581.67, Canal Zone revenues collected since 
July 1, 1915, $691,747.26, profits on business operations, $358,199.05, 
interest on the cost of pul3lic works in the cities of Panama and Colon 
and on bank balances, $599,408.88, and miscellaneous collections, 
$8,035.68, gives the amount repaid on the cost of construction as 
$7,215,288.68. This includes the amount paid by the Panama Rail- 
road for subsidies, dividends and interest, as the Canal would have 
obtained the benefit of these amounts in reduced rates if they had 
not been added to the expenses of the railroad. Deducting the 
amount repaid on the cost of construction and including available 
balances, there is left the sum of $365,182,565.24 as the actual present 
cost of the Canal projects estimated for in 1908. This amount is 
reduced from year to year by receipts from the sale of construction 
material and equipment and by additional collections covering 
expenditures for waterworks, sewers, and pavements in the cities of 
Panama and Colon. The cost of the Canal as a commercial venture 
is also entitled to credit for the value of the buildings, public works, 
and equipment transferred to the Army, the Alaskan Engineering 
Commission, and to the State Department without any actual pay- 
ment therefor. The appraised value of items so transferred is 
$2,087,342.67, of which $146,500 was the value of items constructed 
by the Canal Zone government. (See Tables Nos. 13 and 14.) The 
status of authorized bond issue is shown in Table No. 1. General 
ledger items are shown in Table No. 2. 

CURRENT APPROPRIATIONS. 

The cash balance of the current appropriations for operation and 
maintenance, sanitation, and civil government and for construction, 
on June 30, 1920, amounted to $12,347,642.76. Including the 
amount of the accounts receivable and transfers of appropriations 
to be made in payment for work done and supplies furnished, the 
total of the cash and cash items was $16,325,017.48. The liabilities 
immediately payable, including the amount to be paid the United 
States Shipping Board for the two coal barges, which are now in 
service, amounted to $6,004,775.71. The additional ordinary obli- 
gations outstanding, viz, $3,601,343.84 on outstanding orders, 
$3,480,460.30 on unfilled requisitions, and $2,234,701.77 on allot- 
ments for special work make at total of the regular obligations of 
$15,321,281.62, and leave a balance of $1,003,736.26. This balance is 
a great deal more than offset by the reserves for repairs ($484,268.74) 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 157 

and by the amount clue employees for leaves earned (1813,591.01). a 
large portion of both of which may be required at any time, and by 
the reserves for depreciation on equipment, $2,442,029.86. 

As stated last year, too much stress can not be given to the necessity 
of keeping the appropriations for Canal operation and maintenance on 
a, continuing rather than on an annual basis, and to the maintenance 
of an adequate cash balance to carry on the business operations. 
Work for the Army and Na\y has been done on a very large scale in 
the past and mil continue to be done. Delays in pa^nnents seem- 
ingly can not be avoided. This throws a bm-den on Canal funds that 
must be recognized and provided for. The cash balance with wliich 
to operate can be provided by a special appropriation, or what is 
believed to be better and more in keeping mth the law relative to the 
business operations of the Canal, by considering the reserves for 
depreciation as direct obligations against the appropriations for 
operation and maintenance. Until an amount equal to the reserves 
is retained as a part of the cash assets of the Canal, the entire amount 
appropriated each year must not be expended; the balance must be 
retained and must not be used as a reason for reducing the amount to 
be api^ropriated during the following year. Fluctuations in the 
value of stock on hand also directly affect the cash balance, and if the 
value of the stock falls below the amount authorized for investment in 
stock then the difference must be considered as a direct obligation 
chargeable to the appropriation at any given time. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

[ Tables Nos. 4 and 5.] 

The ordinary expenses for operation and maintenance of the Canal, 
including those of civil government and sanitation, amounted to 
$6,548,272.43, as against $6,112,194.77 expended in 1919, and 
$5,920,342.94 expended in 1918. This does not include expenditures 
for additions and improvements amounting to over $900,000. The 
expense of maintenance dredging increased from $1,152,188.99 to 
$1,611,359.78 due to the slides in Gaillard Cut. Operation expendi- 
tures show increases due to increased wages, also to the additional 
force required by increased traffic through the Canal. The civil 
government expenses show an increase of over $100,000, the main 
increase being for schools and the police force. The expenses of the 
Washington office increased from $327,798.14 to $345,572.98, due to 
some extent to increased compensation following similar increases in 
other departments in the States. Expenses of the executive office 
increased from $416,052.38 to $513,791.17. The main causes were 
the creation of the bureau of shipping commissioner as a part of the 
department of operation and maintenance, and the transfer of all em- 
ployees engaged in clubhouse activities to the force of the bureau of 
clubs and playgrounds. The overhead expenses charged to mainte- 
nance and operation amounted to $3,324,167.10, as against 
$3,382,167.30 charged the prior year. In the overhead expense 
accounts are included charges for civil government amounting to 
$808,658.43, expenses for hospitals, cjuarantine, and sanitation 
amounting to $662,349.90, and $3,267,430.92 expended for adminis- 
tration, including expenses of the executive department, accounting 
department Washington office, operation and repairs of storehouses 



158 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

and quarters, lighting of streets, operation and maintenance of sewer 
system and roads. 

Offsetting the total expenses for operation and maintenance arc the 
amounts earned as tolls for vessels transiting the Canal during the 
year— $8,516,460.80, less refunds, $10,948.49/and less bills canceled, 
$12,438.75 (prior years), or $8,493,082.56 (this amount differs from 
the amount actualiy collected from vessels transiting the Canal because 
of certain unpaid bills on Government operated vessels); the amounts 
collected as licenses and taxes, court fees and lines, $153,102.88, and 
as profits on business operations, $239,686.13, a total of $8,885,871.57. 
The revenues earned in excess of current expenses amounted to 
$2,387,599.14. The charges to operation and maintenance with 
minor exceptions do not include depreciation of plant and equipment. 
Interest on the capital investment is also excluded. 

The expenditures charged to operation and maintenance to date 
amount to $36,657,766.89, to offset which are the total revenues from 
tolls, civil government collections, and profits on business operations, 
amounting to $34,426,675.28, which may be reduced by about 
$64,000 when the balance of refunds of tolls erroneously collected is 
paid. Had Panama Canal tonnage rules been applied, there would 
be a surplus in revenues over expenses of $2,600,000. It is evident 
that b}^ June 30, 1921 , the collections for tolls and other Canal revenues 
will exceed by one or more millions of dollars the total current ex- 
penses of the- operation and maintenance of the Canal to that date, 
after which there should be an excess of $5,000,000 or more each 
year. 

BUSINESS OPERATIONS. 

[ Table No. 7.] 

The total revenue derived from business operations, carried on 
with Panama Canal funds, amounted to $14,705,371.82, as against a 
total of $13,684,881.18 received during the prior fiscal year, an in- 
crease of 7§ per cent over 1919, and 42^ per cent over 1918. The cost 
of carrying on these operations during the last fiscal year amounted to 
$14,465,685.69, leaving a net profit of $239,686.13 to be covered into 
the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts under the Panama Canal act 
and the regular Panama Canal appropriation arts. The net profits for 
the fiscal vear 1916 amounted to $11,898.44; for 1917, $39,427.66; for 
1918 to $6,159.56; and for 1919 to $61,027.26. The result is due to the 
approved policy of making the charges in most cases so as to barely 
cover the cost. Shop work, work for the Panama Railroad, and other 
departments of the Government, and all services rendered for em- 
ployees (and these are the major items) are performed at cost, except 
that both subsistanf'e and hospital services rendered employees are 
consistently rendered at a loss. There was an im-rease in the work 
performed bv the shops, including electrical work, irom $4,277,823.90 
to $5,301 ,273.65. The value of tug service increased from $288,675.36 
to $401,144.61. Sales of water increased by $20,000. The revenues 
from the use of the dry dock at Cristobal increased over $15,000. 
The sales of fuel oil increased from $1,161,573.74 to $1,228,133.66. 
The in<^Tease in business operations at the Canal is shown by the in- 
creased numbers and amounts of formal bills as follows: 



EEPORT OF AUDITOR. 159 





Number of 
bills. 


Amount. 


1915 


8,686 
12,754 
16,385 
22,070 
24,210 
28,825 


$12,197,170.74 


1916 


11,786,187.91 


1917 


17,007,342.16 


1918 


20,887,460.60 
25,272.815.50 


1919 


1920 


28.654 TM fi 







In addition, Panama Railroad commissary bills increased from 
10,733 amounting to $3,459,038.28 in 1917, to 13,100 amounting to 
$4,438,725.57 in 1918, to 13,949 amounting to $5,249,707.46 in 1919, 
and to 12,237 amounting to $6,533,471.27 in 1920. The regular 
Panama Railroad bills increased from 9,285 amounting to $8,993,- 
007.41 in 1917, to 9,652 amounting to $10,282,388.24 'in 1918, to 
10,036 amounting to $12,643,489.63 in 1919, and to 11,198 amounting 
to $14,795,390.37 in 1920, or a total increase from 1917 to 1918 to 
1919 and to 1920, in numbers from 36,404 to 44,822 to 48,195 and 
to 52,260 in bills, and amounts from $29,459,387.85 to $36,008,574.41 
to $43,166,012.59 and to $49,983,593.28, respectively. In addition^ 
many thousand memorandum bills were rendered for land rent,, 
telephones, garage, electric work, and repairs. 

MATERIAL AND SUPPLIES. 

The value of material and supplies in storehouses on June 30, 1920,. 
amounted to $5,654,526.04 as compared with $6,312,836.28 on 
June 30, 1919. In addition, the divisions had on hand for immediate 
use material to the value of $546,618.22. Material issued during the 
year amounted to $8,329,558.22 exclusive of that to the Panama 
Railroad Company. Material and supplies, including fuel oil, were 
sold for $2,644,990.68. For the previous year, issues and sales 
amounted to $7,967,563.30 and $1,887,609.25, respectively. The 
reduction of almost $1,000,000 in the value of the stock in the 
storehouses and in the hands of divisions has been reflected in an 
increased cash balance. (For further information see Tables Nos. 12, 
56, and 57.) 

CONSTRUCTION OF CANAL AND CAPITAL ADDITIONS. 

[ Table No. 8.] 

The expenditures charged to the Canal construction accounts for 
work done during the year were small as compared with prior year 
charges, the total amounting to a little over $1,000,000. The charges 
to capital additions covering expenditures for permanent improve- 
ments, the costs of which were payable from maintenance and opera- 
tion appropriations, amounted to a little over $900,000; the princi- 
pal items chargeable to construction with unit costs where available 
were dredging inner harbor, Balboa, $34,916.25, involving the removal 
of 63,050 cubic yards of material at an average division cost of 
$0.4991 per cubic yard; of this material 84 per cent was earth and 
16 per cent rock (see Table No. 23); sanitary fills and ditches, 
$9,503.54; settlement of claims for private property within the 
Canal Zone, $546,217.05; buildings, $19,877.26, the main item being 



160 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

the completion of Ancon Hospital buildings; the new garbage incin- 
erator at Cristobal, $115,873.52; and Pier No. 6, Cristobal, $113,- 
471.94. There were also transferred to the construction accounts 
about $900,000 which had heretofore been tentatively charged in the 
capital addition accounts; the main items, with the approximate 
amounts involved were dredging Cristobal Harbor, $130,000; exten- 
sions to the electric current system, $233,000; fuel-oil plants, $82,000; 
shops, $186,000; work on locks, $160,000; aids to navigation, $53,000. 
There remains to be expended under construction appropriations 
$2,329,898 for the two new coal barges; $250,000 for work on the 
colliers Ulysses and AcMlles; $325,000 for dredging; and $81,000 for 
the payment of land claims with certain other small amounts which 
make a total of a little over $3,000,000. The main items of expendi- 
ture under capital additions were extension to the power and lighting 
system, $84,858.56; addition to fuel-oil plant, $90,219.50; new 
garages, $20,425.56; fills, roads, water and sewer systems. New 
Cristobal, $187,369.43; terminal storehouses and shop buildings, 
Cristobal piers, $46,182.33; fenders, Miraflores locks, $9,623.32; road, 
Balboa shops to Diablo, $34,452.44; repairs to Docks 13 and 14, 
$32,481.84; quarters for gold employees, $183,000; quarters for silver 
employees, $48,000; and miscellaneous, $87,061.14. 

MANUrACTUKING PLANTS. 

The new Gatun hydroelectric plant and the Miraflores steam electric 
power plant generated 55,300,094 kw. hours during the past year at 
an average cost of $0.0094 per kw. (See Table No. 26.) 

The Ancon-Balboa-Panama waterworks system produced 2,790,- 
202,000 gallons of water at an average cost of $0.0745 per thousand 
gallons. Of this amount 1,026,782,000 gallons were used in the city 
of Panama. The Gatun system produced 427,714,000 gallons of 
water at an average cost of $0.1378 per thousand gallons. The 
Colon-Cristobal system produced 2,157,686,000 gallons at an average 
cost of $0.0609 per thousand gallons. Of this amount 625,374,000 
gallons were used in the city of Colon. (See Tables Nos. 27, 28, and 
29.) 

The sand and gravel reclaiming plant produced a total of 119,618 
■cubic yards. The average division cost of this sand and gravel was 
$1.40 per cubic yard. (See Table No. 25.) 

PUBLIC WORKS, PANAMA AND COLON. 

Under the agreement with the Republic of Panama, which requires 
reimbursement within 50 years from July 1, 1907, for the expenditures 
incurred by the United States for the construction, operation, and 
maintenance of waterworks, sewers, and pavements in the cities of 
Panama and Colon, the expenditures for construction to June 30, 
1920, in Panama have amounted to $1,430,208.91, and in Colon to 
$1,220,382.03, a total of $2,650,590.94. The total expenditures for 
operation and maintenance were $911,083.54 for Panama and 
$798,127.58 for Colon. Besides being authorized to currently reim- 
burse itself from water-rental collections for the expenses of opera- 
tion and maintenance, the United States gradually liquidates the 
expenditures for construction by a quarterly charge equal to one- 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 161 

quarter of the part of the capital cost ascertained by dividing the 
amount thereof by the number of years the contract has to run. 
In addition, the Republic of Panama pays interest at the rate of 2 
per cent per annum on the capital cost balances and on the propor- 
tionate cost of water ivorks in the Canal Zone used for supplying 
water to the two cities, based upon the quantity of water consumed. 
For the work in Panama, this interest has amounted to $293,602.26; 
for the work in Colon, $249,073.16; and for the proportionate cost of 
watervvorks in the Canal Zone, $123,991.09, a total of $666,666.51. 
To liquidate the capital cost there has been paid to the United 
States, or is immediately due, the sum of $563,442.21, leaving a 
balance unpaid of $1,106,926.48 for the work in Panama, and $980,- 
222.25 for the work in Colon, a total of $2,087,148.73, payable in 
installments during the contract period. The amount which is 
payable immediately under the agreement is $94,179.05, and is 
covered by bills for the di.ference between the current charges for the 
work plus the quarterly payments required and the amount collected 
as water rentals. The Panama Canal continues to maintain the 
pavements in the two cities under the temporary agreement reached 
at the beginning of the fiscal year 1918, whereby reimbm-sement is 
still obtained tlirough the water-rental collections. 

EXCHANGE OF PROPERTY WITH PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY. 

The exchange proposed in 1917 of certain property of the Panama 
Railroad Company which is either used by Tiie Panama Canal or 
is a part of the general terminal facilities owned by The Panama 
Canal, for certain property of The Panama Canal used by the Panama 
Railroad Company, together with the cancellation of the notes 
standing against the Panama Railroad Company, still remains to be 
effected. It will very much improve the relationship of the two 
interests if this exchange is ultimately effected. 

EXAMINATION OF PAY ROLLS. 

There were 403,231 pay-roll items, 55,556 gold and 347,675 silver, 
audited prior to payment. Sixty-five errors, involving $274,58, 
were discovered by the Auditor for the War Department upon final 
audit of Panama Canal rolls amounting to $15,141,321.37. Only 
$20.17 were collected from clerks responsible for the errors. The 
gross deductions on the rolls amounted to $6,650,009.19, of which 
$5,628,691.24 were for commissary books and $657,175.70 for Victory 
loan notes and interest thereon, the balance being for miscellaneous 
purposes — silver rentals, Red Cross, hospital charges, etc. Numerous 
changes were required on the pay rolls because of the general in- 
creases in wages to silver employees effective July 1, 1919, and 
February 1, 1920, also on account of increases in the building trades 
effective July 1, August 1, and October 1, 1919, and February 1, 
April 1, and June 1, 1920. The pay rolls, both silver and gold, 
with almost no exception, are now written on the addressographs, 
as are the time books and pay receipts, 

8847—20 11 



162 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

INSPECTION OF ACCOUNTS. 

To examine the accounts of officers and employees charged with 
the collection, disbursement, and custody of Panama Canal and Pan- 
ama Railroad funds, or with other funds which are held by such per- 
sons on account of their official positions, 347 examinations were 
made of the accounts of employees of The Panama Canal, while 164 
were made of the accounts of the Panama Railroad Company, At 
the close of the year there were 116 Panama Canal and 49 Panama 
Railroad accounts subject to inspection. 

TIME INSPECTION. 

There were 10,442 gangs inspected during the year, involving the 
checking of 519,859 employees. Six hundred special reports were 
made by inspectors calling attention to errors of various kinds. The 
actual saving during the year on account of corrections made by the 
time inspection force is comparatively small— S3, 822. 90 — but the 
general benefit of the inspection force can not be questioned. 

FREIGHT CLAIMS. 

There were 2,851 new claims for losses or damage to freight re- 
ceived, the amount claimed approximating $322,000. This is an 
increase of 683 claims and $104,000 over the prior year. The sum 
of $41,651.20 was paid in adjustment of claims assumed by the 
Panama Railroad operations on the Isthmus; in addition $53,077.24 
were charged against the steamship line accounts. This is an 
increase of over $8,000 for the railroad and $30,000 for the steamship 
line. 

CLAIMS FOR DAMAGES TO VESSELS. 

Two claims for damages to vessels passing through the locks, 
amounting to $7,243.51, were settled in accordance with the pro- 
visions of section 5 of the Panama Canal act; also two claims, amount- 
ing to $2,361.98, for damages done in the Canal outside of the locks. 
Damages to a number of vessels were repaired at an expense of 
$5,179.12, making a total of $14,784.61, all adjusted without recourse 
to the courts. The previous year the total payments and cost of 
repairs amounted to $16,739.19. 

BONDS OP EMPLOYEES. 

The schedule bond of employees of The Panama Canal and Panama 
Railroad Company, executed to insure the faithful performance of 
their duties, was continued with the Maryland Casualty Co. The 
total liability for Panama Canal employees was $430,000, and for 
Panama Railroad Company employees, $381,000. No claim was 
made during the year against the surety company for defalcation of 
employees. The total cost for the year was about $1,200. 



KEPORT OF AUDITOR. 163 

COUPON BOOKS. 

The strip coupons have been continued in use through the year. 
All books have been printed at the Panama Canal press, a new- 
printing press having been especially constructed and installed for 
this purpose, with the resulting decided reduction in the cost of the 
books in spite of the heavy increase in the cost of paper and all 
other expenses connected with printing. Books to the value of 
$5,627,605, being $1,100,000 in excess of the amount issued dui'ing 
the preceding year, w^ere issued to emplo5^ees for pay-roll deduction. 
Books to the value of $2,099,832.50 w^ere sold for cash, the total for 
the year amounting to $7,727,437.50, as against the total for the 
preceding year of $6,510,997.50. There w'ere also used during the 
year by silver employees meal tickets to the value of $46,329.50, a 
reduction of $21,000 from the amount used the preceding year.. 
(For further details see Tables Nos. 37-39.) 

CAXAL ZONE ACCOUNTS. 

The balances, unexpended in the old Canal Zone funds account,. 
$6,220.11, were deposited in the Treasury "as miscellaneous receipts,, 
as there were no further obligations outstanding against such items. 
The collections for licenses and taxes during the year amounted to 
$15,354.0.5; court fees and fines $27,694.45; postal receipts, $109,- 
117.48, with miscellaneous items amounting to $57,210.07, a total 
of $209,376.05. During the prior year the sum of $136,876.29 w^a& 
deposited. The cash balance of miscellaneous trust funds, which; 
include clubhouse and money-order funds in the hands of the col- 
lector, have increased from $683,085.95 on June 30, 1919, to $780,- 
757.96 on June 30, 1920. During the year 125,122 monev orders, 
to the value of $3,198,989.98, were issued, as against 140,618 to 
the value of $3,108,678.27 during the previous year, or an increase- 
of $90,311.71. This increase was due to the fact that employees 
no longer invest savings in Liberty bonds. Since the establishment 
of the money-order business on the Isthmus, 2,454,002 orders have- 
been issued to the value of $57,524,064.81. There have been paid 
$40,152,048.33 on money orders drawn on the United States. (See- 
Tables Nos. 41-45.) 

CLUBHOUSE ACCOUNTS. 

The revenues derived from the operation of the various clubhouses 
amounted to $427,118.67, as compared with $463,409.39 received 
during the prior fiscal year. The expenditures amounted to $452,- 
600.34. Soda-fountain receipts amounted to $132,237.49; cigars- 
and candies, $138,073.10; moving pictures, $36,747.87. The items^ 
for soda fountain and cigar and candy accounts show a large decrease- 
over the prior year's receipts, caused by the opening up of the Army 
and Navy Y. M. C. A.'s. The moving-picture receipts show am 
increase over the prior year, while the receipts from membership 
fees w^ere reduced from $808 to $90, caused by the discontinuance off 
these fees. The cash balance on hand June 30, 1920, amounted, 
to $61,107. In addition there w^ere commissary coupons, $10,131.50,. 
and outstanding accounts, $6.44, making a grand total of cash and. 



164 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

cash items of $71,244.94. The year's business operations resulted in 
alossof Slo, 197. 14, reducing the sm-plusfrom$78,021. 25 to $62,824. 11. 
(See Tables Nos. 46-49.) 

Cr>AIMS FOR INJ[TRTES AND DEATHS. 

On July ], 1919, there were pending four death cases and 141 
injury cases. Three of the death cases were approved for payment 
and one was disallowed on account of having no legal dependents. 
Sixteen of tlie injury cases were disallowed; the remainder, if the 
time lost exceeded tbree days, were approved for payment. During 
the past fiscal year there were reported 4,451 accidental injuries and 
17 accidental deaths of employees, as against 3,308 injuries and 23 
deaths during tlie preceding year. Compensation was allowed in 
1,471 cases of injury and 3 cases of death. In 199 cases no com- 
pensation was allowed, the reasons being: 

Cases. 

Injured person not an employee 1 

Insufficient evidence to establish claim 73 

Injurv not sustained in performance of duty 29 

Disability not the result of injury claimed 92 

Failure to give notice of injury as required by act 1 

Intention to cause injury to self or another 3 

In three cases of death no dependents were found, and in one the 
death was not caused by the injury claimed. Ten death cases are 
pending. On account of injuries and deatls occurring during 
prior years, there were paid to employees for injuries $17,705.17; to 
beneficiaries for deaths of employees $3,946.67; to persons injured 
during the year there was paid the sum of $25,123.68, and to bene- 
ficiaries of employee's who died as result of injuries received in line of 
duty, $549.83. The beneficiaries included 1 widow and 13 children. 
In addition there was paid to one person under the Executive order 
of March 20, 1914, the sum of $1,073.95. Sixteen lump sums, 
averaging $988, were paid to injured employees. Three lump sums, 
averaging $510, were paid to benefieiaries of emplo^^ees. Two 
monthly payments of compensation to beneficiaries were discon- 
tinued, one on account of death and the other on a finding of non- 
dependence. 

On June 30, 1920, 35 beneficiaries, 1 widow, 31 children, and 3 
parents were carried on the rolls for monthly payments. Thirteen 
iorme>r employees were being carried on the rolls on account of appar- 
ent disability, 7 of them being totally disabled and being paid the 
maximum compensation. The injury board, consisting of the chief 
health officer, the auditor, and the head e)f the department in which 
the employee was working at time of injury, met approximately once 
a month to determine tlie loss of earning capacity of injured em- 
ployees, and the number of cases considered at each meeting varied 
from 5 to 13. Many claims were based on trivial injuries and were 
disposed of by rcferi-ing tlu^ injured person to the head of his depart- 
ment or division for duty. Otheis involved considerable corre- 
spondence and peisonal interviews with the injured employee, his 
attorney, his diplomatic or consular representative, before any 
final disposition of the case could be made. In all cases of lump-sum 
payments the recipient was paid upon his departure from the Isthmus, 
except one wielow who chose to remain here. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 165 

The paymont of SI, 200 to five crippled inmates of Corozal farm 
was authorized upon their repatriation. Four of these persons have 
been paid and have left the Isthmus. The claim officer has con- 
ducted many investigations in injury and death cases not falling 
under the compensation act. Reports in 170 such cases, including 
reports of injuries to property, were received, many of which 
required extensive inquiries. These investigations have been made 
at the request and in cooperation with the counsel for The Panama 
Canal and Panama Railroad Company. The attention of the heads 
of departments and divisions has in many cases been called to dan- 
gerous places, with the result that many safeguards to life and body 
have been installed. 

The policy relative to making payments was modified somewhat 
during Iho year with th3 result that fewer lump-sum payments 
were made. The payment of compensation in monthly installments, 
especially to children, was deemed desirable. It has been found that 
the majority of gold employees who were for a short ]>eriod of time 
disabled are unwilling to accept compensation at the maximum 
rate — $66.67 per mon.h. One hundred and eleven of these em- 
ployees had the time lost by them from Avork (harged against their 
leave. 72 only a':'cepting payment under the compensation act. 
(See Tables Nos. 50-55.) 

0PERA.T10NS WITH PANAMA RAILROAD (C)MPANY's FTNDS. 

The accounts of tha railroad company show the results of the 
operations of the railroad proper, harbor terminals, coaling plants, 
stables, baggage transfer, and motw-car ma' hine shop carried on 
under the direction of the superintendent of the railroad; of the 
telephone system under the electrical engineer of The Panama Canal; 
of renting of lands and buildings under the land agent and special 
attorney; of the Hotel Washington, commissaries, plantations, 
cattle, poultry, hog, and dairy farms under the (hief ([uartermaster 
of The Panama Canal. 

A reclassiii'-ation was made during the yt^ar of all Panama Railroad 
assets on the Isthmus, showing in more complete detail the prin -ipal 
items of this property, also the reserves for depre'^iation, whi' h was 
set up under a corresponding classifi-ation. New accounts were 
opened for revenues derived from coal and from beef cattle, so as to 
show the sales to various interests, such as commercial, Panama 
Canal, United States Army and Navy, individuals and companies, 
etc. A revised classification of accounts was ])repared and issued in 
pamphlet form. 

RAILROAD, HARBOR TERMINALS, ETC. 

Due to the increase in operating costs, th(i net revenue of the 
railroad proper decreased $165,010.65 as compared with the prior 
year, leaving a i3rofit of only $20,868.77. 

The net revenues from harbor terminal operations amounted to 
$186,718.19, a decrease of $205,981.28, as compared with the previous 
3^ear. Gross* revenues increased $82,386.62 but the gross expenses 
increased $288,367.90. 

The gross receipts from coal sold were $7,243,559.55, and the value 
of this coal, including operating expenses, was $6,274,147.44. The 



166 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

resulting profit for the year wns $989,402.11 as compared with 
$810,379.83 for the previous year. 

The motor busses were continued in oneration to the end of July 
•only, resultino; in a loss of $1,328.24. The Panama stables, which 
were leased during the preceding year for a monthly rental, show a 
net revenue return of $965.54 above the cost of extraordinary repairs 
and depreciation, against a loss of $5,974.38 the previous year when 
the stables were operated by the Panama Railroad. The' operation 
of Colon stables resulted in a loss of $2,436.82. Baggage transfer 
service operated at a profit of $4,459.28, an increase of $3,307.08 
over the previous year. The loss in operating motor-car machine 
shop decreased from $2,575.83 to $1,606.93 for the year ending 
June 30, 1920. The cost of operating the telephone system was 
'$17,534.60 in excess of revenues. 

The net revenue from rental of land was $104,188.40 and build- 
ings $4,093.90, an increase over the previous year of $4,201.25. The 
operation of the Hotel Washington shows a profit for the year of 
$24,046.01, an increase in net revenue of $12,656.77 over the previous 
j^ear. Of the amount of the net revenue for the last two years 
$30,000 was set up as a reserve for depreciation of building, no 
charge having been made haretofore on account of the hotel operat- 
ing at a loss prior to the fiscal year ended June 30, 1919. 

FARM INDUSTRIES. 

The gross revenue from plantation products shows an increase of 
$12,948.28 over last year, and the operating expenses a decrease of 
$17,810.51, resulting "in a loss for the year, however, of $16,276.60, 
compared with a loss of $47,035.39 for the corresponding period of 
the previous year. 

Poultry farm. — The revenue derived from the sale of poultry and 
eggs during the year was $18,924.24, the cost of which was $28,035.19 
in excess of the revenue. 

Hog farm. — The cost of operating the hog farm was $78,196.34. 
The receipts from hogs sold and turned into the abattoir were 
$159,460.71, the cost of whi< h was $175,682.55, including operating 
expenses, resulting: in a loss for tlie year of $16,221.84. 

Dairy farm. — The o])erating <'xpenses of the dairy farm were 
$83,074.39 and the products disposed of, consisting of milk, cream, 
and calves, amounted to $78,697.74, an increase in gross receipts 
over last year of $32,729.73, resulting in a loss of $6,787.29, a de- 
crease in loss compared with the previous year of $35,594.61. 

Caiile. — To provide for the increasing demand for beef cattle the 
commercial steamer Middlcbury was chartered from the United 
States vShipping Board, and after being refitted at Balboa shops for 
this service the steamer was used part of the year for transporting 
cattle from Colombia in conjunction with the steamers Culehra and 
Canhhean. There were 25,241 head of cattle imported by the three 
steamers during the year, and a total of 25,222 head was sold or 
turned in to the abattoir for $2,136,932.05. The resulting loss on 
cattle operations, $189,973.39, was in reality due to th^ breaking of 
the agreement by the Army to purchase beef as the much larger 
importation of cattle that was expected would have enabled the 
spreading of the expense over a larger number of head of cattle. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 167 

The cost^of refitting, maintenance, and operation of the cattle steam- 
ers amounted to $706,826.07, of which the sum of S363, 292.25 covered 
the extraordinary expenses of refitting the steamship Middlehury for 
the cattle service, the expense of overhauling and refitting the steam- 
ship Culehra as a dredge, and extensive repairs on the steamship 
Caribbean. 

COMMISSARY. 

Gross receipts from the sale of commissary supplies amounted 
to $12,407,421.06 as compared with $11,237,646.33 last year. Sup- 
plies were purchased to the amount of $10,190,983.14, including 
$2,044,035.16 for cattle, poultry, and hogs purchased on the Isthmus. 
The net profit amounted to $276,093.40 as compared with $267,282.07 
last year, a very small amount when compared with the $10,000,000 
investment in supplies, plant, and circulating funds. The profits on 
the steamship sales amounted to more than this sum. The value 
of suppUes on hand June 30, 1920, was $2,638,715.72. 

GENERAL. 

The result of all operation of the Panama Railroad on the Isthmus 
shows a net revenue of $1,069,472.78, a decrease of $333,228.38 for 
the corresponding period last year. During the present year 
$2,834,233.08, representing completed improvements, were added to 
the capital account, including $74,254.17 transferred from The 
Panama Canal. In addition to this there remains authorized for 
improvements $1,907,631 .84, of which $1,111,892.10 were expended 
up to June 30, 1920. The principal items authorized and under 
construction are railroad buildings, $33,200; railroad passenger equip- 
ment, $124,000; roadways and track yards at Cristobal pier, $65,000; 
commissary plants and stores, $152,000; new Colon fill. Mount Hope, 
silver townsite, and other real estate improvements, $1,189,000; 
new stables. Colon, $142,000; dredging basin for equipment at 
Cristobal coaling plant, $153,000. 

Detailed statements of revenue, expenses, and statistics of all rail- 
road industries, including steamship line, will appear in the regular 
railroad annual report. Essential data only are contained herein to 
cover in a general way all the operations of the railroad on the 
Isthmus. 

Respectfully submitted. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor, The Panama Canal. 

Brig. Gen. Chester Harding, United States Army, 

Governor, The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. 



INDEX OF TABLES STJFMTTTED WITH REPORT OF THE AUDITOR, 
THE PANAMA CANAL, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1920. 

Table 1. Status of authorized bond issue. 
Table 2. General ledger items. 
Table 3. Statement of appropriations by Congjess. 
Table 4. Statement of operation and maintenance of Canal. 

Table 5. Comparison of current expenses of operation and maintenance with cur- 
rent revenues, by years, 1914 to 1920. 



168 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table 6. .Statement of overhead expenses and distribution thereof, fiscal year 1920. 

Table 7. Statement of profit and loss on business operations. 

Table 8. Construction of Canal and capital additions to June 30, 1920. 

Table 9. Detail of miscellaneous receipts, United States funds. 

Table 10. Detail of eciuipment. 

Table 11. Detail of "work in proci'ess. 

Table 12. Detail of material and supplies. 

Table 13. Detail of assets received from the Canal Zone GoA^ernment. 

Table 14. Detail of assets transferred to other departments of the United States 

Government. 
Table 15. Detail of Panama Canal equipment and property operated by Panama 

Railroad . 
Table Ifi. Detail of Panama Railroad equipment and property operated by Panama 

Canal. 
Table 17. Detail of reserves for gratuity, depreciation, and repairs. 
Table 18. Statement of equipment, material, and supplies paid from construction 

funds but not directly charged to Canal construction accounts. 
Table 19. Detailed cost of pier No. 6, Cristobal. 
Table 20. Detail of buildings, fiscal year 1920. 

Table 21. Detailed cost power producing and transmitting system, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 22. Detailed cost, permanent townsites, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 23. Unit cost of construction dredging, Pacific entrance and Balboa Inner 

Harbor, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 24. Unit cost of maintenance dredging, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 25. Gamboa gravel production, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 26. Unit cost of electric current, by months, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 27. Unit cost of water per 1,000 gallons, Ancon-Balboa-Panama svstem, fiscal 

year 1920. 
Table 28. Unit cost of water per 1,000 gallons, Colon-Cristobal system, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 29. Unit cost of water per 1,000 gallons, Gatun system, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 30. Cost of operation and maintenance of quarters for employees, fiscal year 

1920. 
Table 31. Statement of appropriation receipts and disbursements, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 32. Disbursements by fiscal officers. 
Table 33. Classified statement of collections. 
Table 34. Statement of collector's special deposit account. 
Table 35. Audited pay rolls. 
Table 30. Accounts receivable registered. 

Table 37. Statement of commissary books issued, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 38. Statement of commissary coupons honored, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 39. Statement of meal tickets issued to silver employees, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 40. Balances of miscellaneous trust funds deposited with collector. 
Table 41. Value of money orders issued and paid to June 30, 1920. 
Table 42. Value of money orders issued and paid, by months, to June 30, 1920. 
Table 43. Postal Service "revenues to June 30, 1920." 
Table 44. Postal Service revenues, by months, to June 30, 1920. 
Table 45. Statement of postal saA ings transactions, by months, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 46. Statement of income, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 47. Statement of expenses, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 48. Summary of income and expenses, bureau of clubs and plavgrounds, fiscal 

year 1920. 
Table 49. Balance sheet, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 50. Injury compensation payments, fiscal year 1920. 
Table 51. Injury and death payments, 1908 to 1920. 
Table 52. Number of injuries and exteiit of disability. 

Table 53. Nature of injuries in nonfatal cases, by departments and divisions. 
Table 54. Nature of injuries in nonfatal cases, with amounts of expenditures. 
Table 55. Cause of injuries. 

Table 56. I'urchases of material and supplies and storehouse transactions. 
Table 57. Compaiative statement, by classes, of material on hand June 30, 1919 

and 1920. 
Table 58. Panama Railroad commissary, purchases and sales. 
Table 59. Panama Railroad commissarv, distribution of sales. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



169 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table No. 1 — StaWs of nvthorized bond issue. 

Authorized bond issue S375, 200, 90 .00 

Appro'^riatirns by Coneress to June 30, 1920 5467,431, 257. 41 

Less a mro'^riations f ir— 

Forti'"' cations $34, 658, 400. 81 

Ann'ial -avment to Renublic nf Panama 2,250,000.00 

Ma ntenance, o-ieration, sanitation, and civil gov- 
ernment of 'anal.and increased compensation... 43,997,755.68 

Regulation of commerce 50, 000. 00 

Censorship of foreign mails 120, 000. 00 

— 81,076,156.49 

Appronriated for Canal construction 386, 355, 100. 92 

Less amount exempted by law — 

2 colliers 2, 000, 000. 00 

2 barges 2,329,808.00 

Dock No. 6, Cristobal 2, 093, 190. 00 

Equinoing colliers Ulysses and Achilles 250,000.00 

Covering umrotectei surfaces of colliers 50,000.00 

Re ^airs to steamships Ancon and Cristobal, to 

June 30, 1915 720,000. 00 

Exnended f ir ooeration and maintenance rf Canal. 4, 289, 159. 00 
Stock of material and supplies for operation and 

maintenance of Canal 2, 225, 000. 00 

13,957,247.00 

372,397,853.92 

Balance available for appropriation after June 30, 1920, within limit of cost 

of Panaland authorized bond issue 2,803,046.08 

Appraised value cf American T egatirn building in the city of Panama, exempted from 
charge to bond issue, act of July 1, 1916 22,256. 00 

Balance available for anpropriation within the limit of cost of Canal and 

a'lthnrized bond issue". 2,825,302.08 

Amount anpronriated , charged to bond issue 372, 397, 853. 92 

Amount re-^aid to construction appropriation, account of waterworks, sewers, and pave- 
ments , Panama and Colon 396, 956. 06 

Expended or available for expenditure 372, 794, 809. 9S 

CLASSIFIED STATEMENT. 



Conatruction of Canal. 

Prism excavation 

Locks 

Dams and snillways 

Breakwaters 

Aids to navigation 



Auxiliary worlds. 



Electric power and transmission system 

Coaling statirns 

Fuel-oil rvlants 

Dry docks 

Wharves, piers, and docks (exclusive of Dock 6). 

Playgrounds 

Landscape improvements 

Water and sewer svstems and roads 

Sanitary f Us and ditches 

Townsites 

Improvements Cristobal Harbrr 

Dredging inner harbor and entrance basin 

Prcaratrry work Balboa terminal 

Floating caisson 



Miscellaneous items. 

Real estate 

Purchase from Panama Canal Co 

Investment— Panama Railroad stock... 
Concessirns from Re-^ublic of Panama. . 

Relocation Panama Railrr ad 

Buildings 



Total. 



Expended to 
June 30, 1920. 



$137,190,492.93 

74,51.5,978.56 

17,771,615.81 

9,062,077.94 

868,619.33 



6,140, 

5,964, 

704, 

3,613, 

3,314, 

54, 

34, 

4,615, 

793, 

923, 

162, 

3,550, 

1,808, 

347, 



391.04 
365. 94 

239. 69 
030. 42 

854. 70 
474.41 
847.85 
798.67 
980. 34 
338.07 
619.80 
141.96 
921.65 
868. 15 



3,729,059.30 

38,721,600.16 

155,818.24 

10,000,000.00 

9,800,626.46 
16,132,633.73 



.349,977,48.5.15 



Unexpended 
allotments. 



$147,400.00 



11,000.00 



72,600.00 
106, 700. 00 



Total. 



$137,337,892.93 

74,515,978.56 

17,771,615.81 

9,062,077.94 

879,619.33 



6, 140 

5,964 

704 

3,613 

3,314 

54 

34 

4,615 

793 

923 

235 

3,656: 

1,808: 

347, 



391.04 
365.94 

239. 69 
030.42 

854. 70 
474.41 
S47.85 
798.67 
980.34 
338. 07 
219. 80 
841.96 
921.65 
868. 15 



81,473.40 3,810,532.70 

I 38,721,690.16 

I 155,818.24 

10,000,000.00 

I 9,800,626.46 

8,800.00 ! 16,141,433.73 

427,973.40 ; 350,405,458.55 



170 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 1 — Status of authorized bond issue — Continued. 
CLASSIFIED STATEMENT— Continued. 





Expended to 
June 30, 1920. 


Unexpended 
allotments. 


Totals. 


Miscellaneous items — Continued. 
Public works in the cities of Panama and Colon 


$2,479,522.00 
2,087,342 67 

1,402,880.86 
1,399,114.61 
1,848,217.50 
13,500.00 
7,943,633.49 
5,215,140.30 




$2,479,522.00 
2,087,342.67 


Assets transferred to other departments of the Government 




Equipment and property operated by the 
Panama Railroad $2, 168, 198. 18 

Less Panama Railroad property trans- 
ferred to Canal construction 765, 317. 32 






1,402,880.86 
1,399 114.61 


Reeqninment loan to Panama Railroad 




First fnortgase bond loan to Panama Railroad 




1,848,217.50 


Launch I>ouise 




13 500.00 


Equinment, material, and supplies 




7,943,633.49 
5, 215, 140. 30 


Miscellaneous receipts credited to assets 










Total 


372,366,836.58 


$427,973.40 


372,794,809.98 





Table No. 2. — General ledger items, June SO, 1920. 



Cash in hands of fiscal ofTicers $4,336,652.83 

Appropriation balances, subject 1o 

requisition ' 13, 744, 224. 28 

Accounts receivable 3, 267, 378. 64 

Material and supplies (Table No. 12) 5, 871, 704. 48 
Reequipment loans to Panama 

Railroad Company 1, 399, 114. 61 

First mortgage bond loan to Pana- 
ma Railroad Company 1,848,217.50 

Public works in Panama and Colon 2,65'1,590 94 
Construction of Canal (Table No. S) 352,065,542.89 

Capital additions (Table No. 8) 2, 10:1, 878. 55 

Equipment (Table No. 10) 9, 8^5, 232. 82 

Work in progress (Table No. 11).... 937,962.45 

Panama Canal property operated 

bv Panama Railroad Company 

(table No. 15) 2,168,198.18 

Assets received from Canal Zone 

Government 364, 212. 50 

Assets received from United States 

Army 175,258.99 

Fortifications 31,008,728 94 

Prejentation of laimch Louise to 

French Government 13,500.00 

Property transferred to other do- 

partments United States Gov- 
ernment (Table No. 14) 2,087,342.67 

Miscellaneous receipts credited to 

assei s 5, 215, 140. 30 

Annual payments to Republic of 

Panama 2, 000, 000. 00 

Operation and maintenance of Canal 

(Table No. 4) 36,657,760.89 

Unclassified expenses 209,462 02 



Total 477, 927, 1 10. 



Accoimts payable $3, 729, 454. 58 

Trust fimds and security deposits.. 233,947.59 
Miscellaneous receipts not deposited 

in United States Treasury (Table 

No. 9) 522,177.52 

Panama Railroad propeity operated 

by Parama Canal (Table No. 16) . 842, 468. 60 

Unclassified credits 302, 441. 75 

Reserves (Table No. 17) 3, 739, 889. 61 

Assets received from Canal Zone 

Government (Table No. 13) 544, 792. 37 

Assets received from United States 

Army 183, 724. 99 

Reimbursements account public 

works in Panama and Colon, re- 
paid to appropriations 396,956.06 

Appropriations ly Congress (Table 

No. 3) 467,431,257.41 



Total 477,927,110.48 



Table No. .3. — Statement of appropriations by Congress. 

Canal rights from French comtianv (act of Juno 28, 1902) $40,000,000.00 

Canal Zone ri','lits from Repullirof Panama (act of Apr. 28, 1904) 10,000,000.00 

Canal connect ine .Vtlantir and Pacific Oceans: 

Act of June 2.S, 1902 $10, 000. 000. 00 

Act of Dec. 21, 1905 11,000,000.00 

DeQciencv for fiscal year 1906 (act of Feb. 27, 1906): 

Miscellaneous material purcla'-es in United States 1,000.000.00 

Miscellaneous material rurcbasc^ on Isthmus '400,000.00 

Pavments to Panama Railroad Com panv 200,000.00 

Isthmus pay rolls 2, 100, OIK). 00 

Salaries an(i sprviccs in the United States 75,000.00 

New equipment purchases 1, 5fi5, 786. 00 

Reequi pment of Panama Railroad 650, 000. 00 



21,000,000.00 



5,990,786.00 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 171 

Table No. 3. — Statement of appropriations by Congress — Continued. 

•Classified appropriations, 1907-1920: 
Expen-^es in the United States — 

Salaries; 81, 476, 056. 33 

Incidental expenses 583, 179. 36 



Construction and eneinecrin?^ 

Pav of ofHcers and emnlovees 29, 443, 212. 00 

Pay of skilled and imsliilled labor 101, S09, 961. 00 

Miscellaneous material purchases, etc 109, 881, 514. 24 

Incidental expen.^es on Isthmus 6, 640, 250. 00 



Civil administration — 

Pav of officers and emnlovees 4, .507, 000. 00 

Pav of sldlled and unskilled laborers 191, 000. 00 

.Material and expenses 1, 178, 200.00 



§2,059,235.69 



2-17, 774, 937. 24 



5,876,200.00 



Sanitarv department— 

Pav of officer? and emnlovees 5, 391, 000. 00 

Pay of skilled and unskilled laborers 3, 036, 968. 00 

Material and expenses 5, 662, 367. 15 

14, 09, 3.35 . 1 5 

Reequipment of Panama Railroad 4,180,000.00 

Relocation of Panama Railroad 7.815,000.00 

Redemotion of first-niort2'at;e bonds of Panama Railroad Company 2,298,367.50 

Sanitation in cities of Panama and Colon 800,000.00 

Survey of lands, Canal Zone 75, 000. 00 

Relief of Pembroke B. Benton for injuries 10,000. 00 

Construction and equipment 24, 328, 088. 00 

Private acts for relief — 

Klizabeth G. Martin, June 17, 1910 1,200.00 

Marccllus Troxell, -Tan. 13, 1911 1,500.00 

W. L. Miles, Feb. 13, 1911 1,704.18 

Chas. A. Caswell. Mar. 2, 1911 1,056.00 

Heirs of Robert S. Gill, Julv 3, 1912 2,520.00 

Dou'^las B. Thompson, Julv 3. 1912 1. 500. 00 

Alle-andra Comba, .Tulv 10, 1912 .500. 00 

Peter Wi?sinton, Feb. 7, 1913 500.00 

Raymond R. Ri.lenous Feb. 7, 1913 500.00 

Heirs of Charles B. Stump, Feb. 7, 1913 1,500.00 

Parents of Kdward Maher, Feb. 18, 1913 1,980.00 

Oscar F. Lackev, Feb. 18, 1913 1,500.00 

Pedro Sanchez, Feb. 18. 1913 2,000.00 

JohnH. Cole, Feb. IS, 1913 1.951.38 

Robert Co'jsen, Feb. 18, 1913 i; 500. 00 

Wife of William Goodlav, Julv 17, 1914 1,000.00 

John Burrows, Feb. 27, 1915 1,433.33 

F. W. Theodore Schroeter, Mar. 3, 1915 1,397.66 

L. V. Thoma--. Mar. 3, 1015 1,680.00 

Joseph A. Buckhclt, Au^. 4, 1916 3,000.00 

Olaf Nelson, Aug. 8, 1916 1, 200. 00 

31,122.55 



.Tudements of the Court of Claims, War — 

Act of Aug. 26, 1912 196. 45 

Act of Mar. 4 . 1913 900. 00 

Act of Julv 29, 1914 905. 38 

Act of Feb. 28. 1 916 1 , 000. 00 

Act of Sept. 8,1916 2, 537. 20 



5,539.03 



Judement, United States Court (act of Apr. 6, 1914) 9,489. 

Presenting steam launch Louise to French Government (act of Aug. 25, 1914) 6,000.00 

Total for Canal construction, rights, etc. , to June 30, 1920 386, 355, 100. 92 

Fortifications: 

Aeronautic stations .5250,000. 00 

Aviation seacoast defences 500, 000. 00 

Armament of fortifications 14 , 2.56, 786. 17 

Armv quarters, storehouses, etc 8,223,069. 70 

Building and materials 57, 375. CO 

Cantonment construction 500, 000. 90 

Cadseway 150, 000. 00 

Construction of sea walls and embankments 63, 000. 00 

Electric li 'ht and power plants 301, 631. 00 

Field firtifications and camps 394, S50. 00 

Fire control 976, 190. IS 

Land f t military purposes 50, 000. 00 

Land defon- es -. 45, 100. 00 

Maintenance rf clearinsrs and trails 176, 900. 00 

Maintenance, etc., of fire-control installations 45, 000. 00 

Maintenance of searchlights and electric power equipment 57,500.00 

Ordnance depot 652. 400. 00 

Pre^ervatif^n and repair of fortifications 99,400.00 

Protectincr Panama Canal and structures 450,000. 00 

Re-erve eouipment fnr f ,irt ifications 57, 500. 00 

Sanitarv clearing, filling, etc 210, 000. 00 

Seacoa='t batteries 6, 44 7, 500. 00 

Searchlii.'hts for seacoast firtifications 601 , 840. 00 

Sites for seacoast fortifications 155, 000. 00 



172 



THE PAXAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 3. — Statement of appropriations by Congress — Continued. 

Fortifl3ition> — Continued. 

Submarine mines $068,310. 00 

Submirme mine structures 322, 210. 00 

Submarine base 1, 652. 625. 00 

Survcvs 62, 000. 00 

^ $37,425,683.02 

Less amounts transferred to United States Treasury surplus 
fund: 

Armament of fortifications $2, 214, 000. 00 

Sea walls and embankments 3, 000. 00 

Submarine mines 215,082. 21 

Submarine mines— structures 15 , 2('0. 00 

Ordnance depDt 260, 000. 00 

2.767,282.21 34,658,400.81 

Annual pavment to Republic of Panama: 

Act of Mar. 4,1913 $250, 000. 00 

Act of Apr. 6, 1914 2.50,000. 00 

Act of Jan. 25, 1915 250, 000. 00 

Act of] eb. 28. 1916 250,a')0.00 

Act of .Tulv 1 . 1 916 2.50, 000. 00 

Act of >rar. 3.1917 250, 000. 00 

Act of Apr. 15. 1918 250,000.00 

Act of Apr. 15, 1919 2.50, 000. 09 

Act of June 4, 1920 250, 900. 00 

2,250,000.00 

Rea:iilatins commerce, act of Mav 20, 1918 50,000. 00 

Censorship of foreign maih, act of May 20, 1918 120,000.00 

170,000.00 

Maintenance and operation of Canal: 

Maintenance and operation, Panama Canal 36,497,939.00 

Sanitation. Canal Zone, Panama Canal 4, 000, 000. 00 

Civil government, Panama Canal and Canal Zone 3,442,000.00 

Increases of compensation, Panama Canal 57, 816. 68 

43,997,755.68 

Total appropriation by Congress to June 30, 1920 467,431,257. 41 

y 
DETAIL OF ACTS FOR MAINTENANCE ANT) OPERATION, SANITATION, CIVIL GOVERN- 
MENT, AND CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPMENT. 





Maintenance 

and 

operation. 


Sanitation 
Canal Zone. 


Civil govern- 
ment Panama 

Canal, 
Canal Zone. 


Total. 


Construction 

and 
eiuipment. 


Act of Mar. 3, 1915 


?5, 200, 000. 00 
5, 750, 000. 00 
9,000,000.00 


S700,000.00 
700,000.00 
700,000.00 


$.540,000.00 
600,000.00 
700,000.00 


$6,440,000.00 
7,050,000.00 
10,400,000.00 


$10,500,000 00 


Act of Jjly 1, 19)6 


9, 750, 000. 00 


Act of J'lne 12, 1917 


2,755,000.00 


Act of Mar. 28, 1918 


593, 190. 00 


Act of June 4, PtlS 




150,666. 00 

900,000.00 
850, 000. 00 


""756,' 666.' 66' 

702,000.00 
150, 000. 00 


150, 000. 00 

10,650,000.00 

9,009,9:31.00 

150, 000. 00 

10,006.22 

16,000.00 

26,810.46 

5,000.00 




Act of Jrly 1 1918 . 


9, 000, 000. on 
7,547,939.00 




Act of July 19, 1919 

Act of Nov. 4, 1019 


729, 898. 00 


Inrreaso of compensation Pan- 
ama Canal, 1918, act of July 12, 
1917 


10, 006. 22 
16, 000. 00 
20, 810. 46 
5,000.00 






Increase of comrensation Pan- 
ama Canal, 1919, act of July 3, 
1918 








Increase of comrensation Pan- 
ama Canal, 1920, Act of Mar. 1, 
1919 








Increase of compensation Pan- 
ama Canal, 1920, act of July 19, 
1019 
















Total 


.36,555,755.68 

• 


4,000,000.00 


3,442,000.00 


43,997,755.68 

4,289,159.00 
2,225,000.00 


24,328,088.00 


Amount approprialcd for con- 
struction but used for main- 
ten inrc and or eralion and not 
charge ible atjainst authorised 
bond iss. e (act of Aug. 1, 1914, 
sec. 12): 
Miintenance and o|ieralion 
prior to July 1, 1915 


Stock of material for main- 
tenance and operation. 




















Total for maintenance 
and operation 








50,511,914.68 














Act (it Junes, 1920 


7,531,851.00 


850,000.00 


900,000.00 


9,281,851.00 









REPORT OF AUDITOR. 173 

Table No. 4.— Panama Canal operation and maintenance to June 30, 1920. 



Marine division: 

AdmensiTf mcnt of vessels 

Lo' al inspe'^ lion 

A ids to navigation 

rilotaee 

Operation of harbor ttics— balance 

Operation of port captain's office— balance. 
Assisting vessels through cut 



Total marine division. 



Locks, operation and maintenance: 
Gatim lo-ks— 

Ptiperintendence 

Operation 

Maintenance 



Total Gatim locks . 
Gatun spillway 



Pedro y iguel locks: 
f- uperintendence. 

Operation 

Maintenance 



Total Pedro Miguel locks. 



Pedro Miguel dams. . 

MiraPores locks: 
fupcrintendence. 

Operation 

Maintenance 



Total Miraflorcs locks 

Miratlores spillway and east dam ; . 



Miraflores west dam— maintenance 

Total lock operation and maintenance . 

Dredging: 

Atlantic entrance 

Gatun Lake 

GaillardCut 

Mirafiores Lake 

Pacific entrance 

Pacific Inner Harbor 



Total dredging. 



Gatun dam, maintenance 

Removal of floating obstnictions 

Gatun-A-indi levee, maintenance 

Colon west breakwater, maintenance. . 
Naos Island breakwater, maintenance. 

Damage to vessels in lor ks 

Damage to vessels in Canal 

Operation of floating derricks 

Maintenance ol transportation trucks.. 

Dry excavation, Rio Clrande 

Shop expense, Balboa, balance 

Capital losses 

Capital replac cmcnts 

Loss on business operations 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



Total operation and maintenance. 
Proportion of overhead expenses 



Total. 



Revenues: 

Tolls 

Interest, licenses, taxes, fees, fines, etc . 
I rofit on business operations 



Total revenues 

Revenues in excess of expenses 

Expenses in excess of revenues earned . 



$21, 
4, 



128, 

74; 
53 



650. 91 
104. 76 
S57.2S 
416.96 
343. 04 
SCO. 48 



381,173.43 



28,748.49 
155, .566. 39 
142,643.16 



326,958.04 



Fiscal year 
1920. 



$31,385.91 

7,292.82 

122,794.31 

188,. 53.5. 36 

68, .5.55. 45 

47, 999. 85 

7, 788. 60 



Total to 
date. 



464,352.31 



$101,536.06 
28, 607. 82 
510,051.30 
619, .525. 44 
296,963.12 
164,896.78 
13,906.63 



1,73.5,487.15 



29,1.54.46 
200,021.35 
143,849.71 



22,429.48 
1.56,080.69 
53,027.12 



231,537.29 



373,025.52 
6,535.37 



19,620.70 
174,494.38 
84,434.88 



278,549.96 



17,613.67 
170,423.13 
123,593.92 



311,630.72 



753. 68 



19,731.61 
190,935.95 
113,354.13 



1,323.49 



131.763.16 

780,099.45 
878, 710. 39 



1.790, .573. 00 
76,131. 



112,156.85 
617,347.67 
533,850.85 



1,263,35.5.37 



168. 96 



115,755.09 
782, 603. 61 
662, 450. 42 



1,560,809.12 



18, 719. 



832.37 



877,105.95 983,456.03 



6,868.56 

12,530.77 

684,563.67 



448,225.99 



1,152,188.99 



17,707.93 
22, 578. 72 



5, 789. 70 
10,949.49 
77,591.81 
55,022.49 



108, 108. 69 
21,810.27 



2,730,027.47 
3,382,167.30 



6,112,194.77 



6,156,118.95 
136,870.77 
61,027.26 



6,354,016.98 
241,822.21 



9,017.14 

6,293.82 

1,116,835.70 

23.95 

290, 835. 16 

188,354.01 



1,611,359.78 



21,631.28 
33,063.09 



4,710,590.56 



198,369.28 

19,267.47 

11,016,556.74 

85,301.91 

1,166,625.78 

188,354.01 



12,674,475.19 



7, 243. 51 

7, .541. 10 

46, 874. 32 

46, 127. 42 



1,363.95 
1,092.54 



3,224,105.33 
3,324,167.10 



132,435.07 

166,290.75 

31,326.04 

81,523.46 

14,193.-55 

19,912.44 

46,249.66 

577,247.57 

266, 104. 34 

37, 606. 99 

19, 158. 55 

126, 095. 89 

22,902.81 

61,823.17 



20,723,423.19 
15,934,343.70 



6,548,272.43 36,657,766.89 



8,493,082.56 
203, 102. 88 
239,686.13 



33,303,581.67 
764,894.56 
358, 199. 05 



8,935,871.57 
2,387,599.14 



34,426,675.28 
"2,'23i,'69i.'6i 



174 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 5. — Comparison of current expenses of operation and maintenance with cur- 
rent revenues, hy years, 1914 to 1920. 



Fiscal year. 


Maintenaucr 
and opera- 
tion include 
proportion 
of overhead. 


Revenues. 


Revenues in 
excess of 
expenses. 


Expenses in 
excess of 
revenues. 

$151,412 23 


Excess of 
revenues 
over ex- 
penses to 
date. 


Excess of 
expenses 

over 
revenues 
to date. 


1914 .. 


$166,030.91 
4, 123, 128. 09 
6,999,750.15 
6,788,047.6') 
5,921,342.94 
6.112,194.77 
6,548,272.43 


S14,61S.6S 
4,343,383.69 
2,558,542.38 

5, S:iS, 398. 70 

6, 411,843.28 
6.3.54 016.98 
8,935 871.57 






$151,412.23 


1915 


$221,255.6) 


$68,843.37 


1916 


4,441,2)7.77 
979,648.90 


4,519,177.92 
5,352 013.30 


1917 






1918 


491 , 500. ?4 

241,822.21 

1! .?S7 ."iflfl 14 




4,860 512 96 
4, 618, 690. 75 
2,231,091.61 


1919 






1920 














Total . . 


36 657 766 89 ■"'') 49fi 67.1 58 


3,341,177.29 


5,572,268.90 




2,231,091.61 













Table No, 6. — Statement of overhead expenses, fiscal year 1920. 



Civil government : 
Civil affairs — 

Adininistrafion. 

Posts 

Customs 

Estates 



Total civil affairs. 



Schools 

Fire protection 

Police and prisons. . 

District courts 

Magistrate courts. . . 

District at tomey 

Canal Zone marshal . 
Municipal expenses. 



Total civil goverrmient. 
Charged to other interests 



Amount apportioned. 



Health department: 

Adminis t rat ion 

Medica 1 storehouse 

Ancon Hospital 

Colon Hospital 

Santo Tomas Hospital 

Palo Seen Leper Asylum 

Corozal Farm and Insane Asylum 

Other hospitals and dispensaries 

Quarant ine service 

Sanitation — 

Panama 

Colon 

Canal Zone 

Street cleaning and disposal of garbage — 

Panama 

Colon 



Total health department. 
Charged to other interests 



Amount apportioned. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



$13, 086. 07 

165,192.64 

57, 453. 21 

82. 03 



235,813.95 



150,3.80.02 
81,147.93 
29.3, 498 08 
17, 585. 52 
12,551.49 
6, 877. 77 
8, 069. 16 
43.62 



805,967.54 
98,372.23 



707,595.31 



21, 
16 

477; 
82 
14, 
33, 

111, 
35, 
64, 

67, 

57, 

161, 

73, 
37, 



510.68 
, 242. 98 
694.. 53 
128. 85 
792. 00 
091.52 
046.58 
491.14 
, 850. .55 

308.05 

734. 72 
505. 57 

004. 73 
182 98 



1,251,584.88 
605,249 42 



646,335.46 



Fiscal year 
1920. 



$5,339.91 

171,516.54 

36, 258. 16 

2,731.25 



215, 845 86 



170,481 42 

91,063.58 

335,436 66 

22,910.51 

14,535.07 

7, 975. 22 

8,260.01 

44.21 



866,552.54 
57, 894. 11 



808,658.43 



22 291.37 
15.349.41 

578,439.70 
99,938.44 
13,566.13 
35, 836. 89 

125,494.16 
44, 875. 37 
90,388.63 

70, 768 60 
59,668.00 
143,983.52 

87,328.36 
50,703.59 



1, 438, 629 17 
776,279.27 



662,349.90 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 175 

Table No. 6. — Statement of overhead expenses, fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 



Supply department: 

Maintenance and care of Administration Building , 

Operation of storeliouses 

Repair? to si orehouscs 

Handling freight on docks 

Operation of quarters 

Mai erial stock losses 

Repairs to quart ers 

Inventory adjustments 

Repairs to otlier buildings 

United States bills, adjustments 

Aneon nursery 



Total 

Charged to other interests. . . 

Amoimt apportioned. 



Accoimting department: 

Accoimling office 

Paymaster's office . . 
Collector's office . . . . 



Total 

Charged to other interests . . 

Amount apportioned . 



Washington office: 

Assistant auditor's office, 
risbursing cleric's office. . 

Generel biueau '. . . 

Purchasing expenses 



Total 

Charged to other interests . . 

Amount apportioned. 



Miscelbneous: 

Tnnspirtation of employees on Isthmus. 

Recraiting and repatriating 

Compensation to injured employees 

Land office ." 

Speci " 1 1 1 torney 

Payments to deported alien cripples 



Tot-1 

Charged to other interests . . 

Amoimt apportioned. 



Administration: 

E.xec'Hi e office— 

Exec'ti e 

Miscellaneous bureaus — 

Correspondence 

Record b'lrexu 

Persoimel bureau 

Property and requisition bureau . 

General bureau 

Bureau of pay rolls 

Clubs and playgrounds 

C;in " 1 record 

Offici 1 motor cars 

C bleirams and radiograms 

Miscell ineous 

Bureau ofs^Histics 

Bureau of shipping commissioner 



Total executive office . . . 
Charged to other interests. 

Amount apportioned 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



$33, 1S6.97 

526, 392 in 

in; 960. 94 

4, ens. 30 

825,nn9.58 

57,619 39 

314 708.62 

1 85, 157. 71 

6,283.16 
I33,n86.35 

5, 208 03 



1,665,933.03 
202,902.59 



Fiscal year 
1920. 



S4n, 064. 39 

713,528.09 

2. 755. 79 

16,464.01 

557,835.67 

.53, 577. 85 

374, 194. 09- 

19,633.35 

1,302.22 

1 15, 518. 40 

5,229.71 



1,739,800.07 
280,323.06 



1,463,030.44 



378,040.76 
50, 290. 35 
43,945 32 



472, 276. 43 
167,266.73 



1,459,477.01 



404,090.11 
52, 430. 83 
43, 243. 22 



499, 764. 16 
175,127.53 



305,009.70 



42, 261. 78 

12,164.76 

67,098.89 

213,107.31 



324,636.63 



41,819.03 
11,928.65 
70,3 8.71 

222, 892. ea 



334,632.74 

6,834.60 



347,009.02 
1,436.04 



327, 798. 14 



141,300.00 
48,857.31 
1,710.88 
10, 175. G8 
8,584.21 
3,3.50.00 



345, 572. ! 



213,978.08 
19,084.21 



194,893.87 



141,603.68 
51,554.96 

1,073.95 
13,377.22 
ll,r30.15 

1,200.00 

219.839.96 
20, 030. 15 

199, 809. 81 



47, 404. 74 

45,941.17 
51,255.53 
27, 667. 22 
29, 022. 85 
62, 093. 81 
89, 738. 34 
122,956.62 
10, 1.54. 46 
16, 596. 80 
9,721.03 
1,3.52. .52 
13, 193. 21 



527,098.30 
111,045.92 



416,052.38 



44,161.93 . 

.39,615.19 
57, 527. 82 
29, 293. 94 
31, .590. 78 
55, 253. 46 
97,009.44 
217,921.42 
12,199.31 
21,945.22 
9,5tU.10 
4,. 542. 79 
1.5,129.53 
33,2o4.95 



669, 016. 88 
155, 225. 71 



513,791.17 



1 Credit. 



176 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table No. 6. — Siatemeni of overhead expenses, fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 



' 


Fiscal year 
1919. 


Fiscal year 
1920. 


Engineer of miintenance: 


$48, 346. 07 
38,828.34 
33,920.22 


$')4,180. 11 


Snrve3'S. 


43,903.31 


Meteorology and hvdrosiraphy ... 


35 793.67 






Totnl 


121, 094. f 3 
45,932.35 


134, 967. 09 


Charged to other interests . 


41,861.05 






Amount apportioned . . 


75, 162. 28 


93, 106. 04 




Electrical division: 

Lights, street, lodge halls, and churches 


6, 797. 29 


14,609.73 






Amount apportioned 


6,797.29 


14,609.73 






Municipal en<;ineenng: 

Operation and mnintenance of waterworks 


418, 5.56. 79 

22,027.25 

439,374.24 


449, .595. 60 


Repairs to sewer system 


24,966.88 




135, 299. 56 






Tot^l 


879,9.^8.28 
4^8,842.99 


610,862.04 




294,434.49 








411,115.29 


316, 427. 55 






Grand tot?l: 


4. 221, 768. 78 
1,021,909.39 


4,235,868.95 




968, 438. 03 








3, 199, 8,W. 39 


3,207,430.92 








6,279,321.20 
1, 725, ,531. 04 


6,541,0.50.66 


Charged to other interests 


1,802,611.41 






Total amount apportioned. . 


4,553,790.16 


4, 7.38, 439. 25 






Distributinn: 

OperUion and maintenance of Canal 


3,382,167.30 

149,510.97 

119,385.48 

724,472.09 

61,529.17 

5, 795. 25 

121.86 

9,316.70 

3,015.15 

98, 476. 19 


3,324,167.10 


Construction of Cinal 


.54,755.89 


FortiSc tims 


328,721.46 




887,319.51 




17,498.39 


Puhlic works in cities of Panama and Colon. 


9,7.56.49 




16, 122. 72 




i3,22o.31 




1 430.32 


Capital additions. . 


103, 754.. 32 






Total 


4,553,790.16 


4,738,439.25 







> Credit. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



177 



Table No. 7. — Statement of projit and loss on bushuss operations for fiscal year ended 

June SO, 1920. 



DEPAETMENT OF OPEEATION AND MAINTINANCE. 



Construction and repairs 

Shopwork 

Electric work 

Electric currents 

Train service and use of rolling equipment. 

Tug service 

Service of other floating equipment 

Pilotage 

Wharfage 

Sales of v.ater 

Panama waterworks 

Panama pavements 

Colon waterworks 

Colon pavements 

Handling hnes on docks 

Handling lines on locks 

Steamship inspection 

Dredging 

Minor services, supplies and property 

Dry dockage: 

Balboa 

Cristobal 



Total department of operation and maintenance . 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Subsistence: 

Hotel Tivoli 

Hotel Aspinwall 

Line hotels 

Messes 

Minor services, supplies, and property 



Total subsistence. 



QUARTERMASTER. 



Material from stock. 
Fuel oil 



Rock, sand, gravel, and screenings. 

Printing and binding 

Corral 



,725,601.51 

,844,622.95 

456,650.70 

174,692.06 

198.30 

401,144.61 

74,690.94 

62,610.74 

24,953.36 

211,939.20 

110,600.10 

15,823.07 

69,271.49 

7,094.66 

84,673.99 

4,064.68 

1,346.34 

85,779.98 

22,031.10 

121,905.42 
26, 187. 18 



Revenue. 



$1,726, 

5,026, 

465, 

181, 

324, 

81, 

78, 

32, 

239, 

110, 

15, 

69, 

7, 

65, 

1, 

2, 

85, 

23, 



399. 69 
914.49 
853.33 
348.64 
236.81 
370. 12 
243. 71 
105. 00 
206. 97 
719.31 
600. 10 
823.07 
271.49 
094.66 
518.00 
434. 00 
985. 75 
779.98 
386. 77 



Profit or loss. 



148,206.53 
35,502.04 



8,525,882.44 | 8,722,000.46 



203,433.16 

56,204.97 

739,177.27 

160,131.65 



205,533.00 

45,240.51 

665, 764. 15 

158,822.85 

1,941.13 



1,158,947.05 j 1,077,301.64 



1,638,597.07 

1,006,393.61 

29,583.65 

55,336.26 

146,449.96 | 

Rental of gold quarters 829. 97 

Rental of silver quarters 148, 936. 89 ' 

Gai age rental 2, 946. 52 : 

Ancon nursery 5,545.94 

Handling fuel oil 77, 456. 35 

Operation of stores 54,047.97 i 

Operation of quarters | 140, 600. 00 i 

Minor services, supplies, and property 177,929.90 

Las Cascadas, sih^er settlement I 4 035. 11 i 



1,689,321.79 

1,228,1.33.66 

29,583.65 

54,940.85 

147,307.50 

829. 97 

117,346.19 

8,601.04 

5,545.94 

146,449.32 

54,047.97 

140,600.00 

178,161.93 

4,035.11 



Total quartermaster | 3,488,689.20 j 3,804,904.92 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT. 



Lost metal cheeks 

Cablegrams 

Service to 1 anama Railroad Company. 

Safety deposit boxes 

Minor services, supplies^and property. 



Total, accounting department . 



Ancon Hospital: 

Fees 

Mess 

Burials 

Miscellaneous.. 
Colon Hospital: 

Fees 

Mess 

Miscellaneous.. 
Palo Scco Asylum. 
Line dispensaries . . 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



17.35 
1,511.56 

228, 160. 05 
529. 60 
103. 76 



379. 12 

1,979.34 

228, 161. 77 

529. 60 

103. 76 



230, 322. 32 



462, 
17, 
7, 
2, 

38, 

4, 

18, 
17, 



657. 59 
230. 93 
851.40 
491.48 

156. 14 
720. 02 
383. 17 
454. 76 
012. 43 



231, 153. 59 



249, 763. 47 

17,230.93 

7,851.40 

2,491.48 

31,107.57 

4, 720. 02 

383. 17 

14,104.53 

17,012.43 



$798. 18 

182,291.54 

9,202.63 

6,656.58 

38.51 

176,774.49 

6,552.77 

15,494.26 

7,253.61 

27,780.05 



119,155.99 

12,630.68 

1.639.41 



1,355.67 

26,301.11 
9,314.86 



196,118.02 



2,099.84 
110,964.46 
173,413.12 
11,308.80 

1,941.13 



181,645.41 



50,724.72 
221,740.05 



1395.41 
857.54 



'31,590.70 
5,654.52 



68,992.97 



232.03 



316,215.72 



361. 77 

467. 78 

1.72 



831.27 



1212,894.12 



16,988.57 
'i"4,'356.'23 



' Credit. 



8847—20- 



-12 



178 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 7. — Statement of frofit and loss on business operations for fiscal year ended 

June SO, 19^0— Continued. 





Cost. 


Revenue. 


Profit or loss 


HEALTH DEPARTMENT — continued. 

Quarantine: 


$32,804.84 
8,058.97 

10,976.59 
14,937.76 
15,754.78 

88,093.38 
30,361.18 

15,364.33 

127. 10 

931.50 

50,247.14 

22, 815. 63 

478.42 


S33,897.07 
8,058.97 

10,976.59 
14,937.76 
15,754.78 

57,326.04 
30,361.18 

15,364.33 

127.10 

931.50 

80,570.33 

26,033.24 


$1,092.23 


Other charges 


Hanitation: 




Colon 




Zone 




Street cleaning, garbage collection, disposal, and incineration: 
Panama 


130,767.34 


Colon 




Coro7,al Hospital: 

Produce 




Pasturage 










30,323.19 


Sales from medical store 


3,217.61 




1 478. 42 








Total, health department 


859,909.54 


639,063.89 


> 220, 845. 65 








5,459.00 

917. 84 

33,360.38 

6,082.56 

9,887.07 

920.50 


5,459.00 

913.56 

33,360.38 

6,082.56 

9,493.82 

920. 50 




Sale of school books 


14.28 






Postal service 






» 393. 25 










Total, civil government 


56,627.35 


56,229.82 


I 397. 53 






EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 


88,364.41 
1,379.30 
9, 837. 80 
160. 03 
106.06 
185.90 
24.80 


88,364.41 

1,379.30 

9, 858. 00 

160. 03 

212.11 

335.94 

24.80 








Motor-car service 


20.20 








106.05 


Lost photograph identification checlss 


150.04 










Total, executive department 


100,058.30 


100,334.59 


276.29 






MISCELLANEOUS. 


13,856.64 

4,013.76 

9,000.00 

7.20 

46.68 

18,162.99 

162.22 


22,583.84 

7,400.27 

9,000.00 

7.20 

46.68 

34,999.98 

344.94 


8,727.20 


Building rental 


3,386.51 














Pier rental 


16,836.99 




182. 72 






Total, miscellaneous 


45,249.49 


74,382.91 


29,133.42 






Total 


14,465,685.69 


14,705,371.82 


239,686.13 







1 Credit. 



KEPORT OF AUDITOR. 



179 



Table No. %.— Construction of Canal, and capital additions, fiscal ijcar 1920, arid totals 

to June SO, 1920. 

[Amounts include Canal overhead.] 



t^onstruetion of Canal: 
Prism excavation— 

Gatun to sea 

Gatiin to Pedro Mi?iiel (Tables Nos. 23 and 24) . 
I'edro Miguel to sea (Tables Nos. 23 and 24) 



Total prism excavation. 



Cfatun locks 

Pedro Miafiiel locks 

Miraflores locks 

tiatun spillway 

Miraflores spillway and east dam 

Gatun dim '. 

Gatun-Mindi levee 

Trinidad River dam 

Pedro Mi?uel dims 

Miraflores AVest dam 

La Boca locks and dims (abandoned). 

Col^n East breakwater 

Colon AVest b-ealrwater 

Noas Islmd b eakwater 

Aids to navigition 

Improvements — Cristobal Harbor 



Total, Can. 1. 



.Niixiliary works: 

Power producing and transmitting system (Table 
No. 21)— 

Gatun hydroelectric plint . . .>. 

Miraflores steam-electric pl.mt 

Substations, transmission, and distributian lines. 

Street lighting, to^viisites 

Underground duct system, townsites 

Total power producing and transmittingsystem 

Pacific te minis— 

CoTllug st ition 

Fuel-oil plant 

Dry dock 

Docks 

Dredging umer harbor 

Entrance basin 

Preparatory work 

Total. Pacific terminal.-; 

Atlantic terminpls — 

Coaliug station 

Fuel-oil plant 

Dry dock 

Docks 

Total. Atlantic terminals 

Gatim dock 

Permanent townsites (Table No. 22)— 

Cristobal 

Gatun 

Pedro Miguel 

Red Tank 

Ralboa-Ancon 

La Boca 

Total, permanent townsites 



Construction 
ofCui-1, 
total to 

June 30, 1920. 



?1 1,874, 182. cSS 
107,009,684.71 
18, 30(i, 625. 34 



137, 190, 492. 93 



3i, 72(1, 

1.1,704, 

23,08.5, 

4,081, 

1,320, 

9,823, 

140, 

66, 

431, 

1, 159, 

748, 

3.771, 

4, 275, 

1,01.5, 

868, 

162. 



193. 26 
.575.93 
209. 37 
51G. 86 
389 95 
140. (JO 
635. 01 

385. 47 
703. 66 
789. 78 

054. 48 
111.74 
316. 42 
649. 78 
619. .33 
019. 80 



Capital 

additions. 

total to 

June 30, 1920. 



102, .380, 911. 44 




14,762,277.87 



3,679,797.59 

310,113.00 

73,475.51 

2, 208, 996. 80 



,484. .55 



67, 608. 62 

6, 728. 03 

15, ,523. 22 

93,344.42 



42, 2^,0. 83 



Total to 
Jime 30, 1920. 



$11,874,182.88 
107, 009, 684. 71 
18,:306,625.34 



137,190,492.93 



35, 726, 

15.704, 

23,085, 

4,081, 

1.320, 

9, 823, 

140, 

66, 

431, 

1.159, 

748, 

3,771, 

4, 275, 

1,015, 

868, 

162, 



193. 7& 
575. 9? 
209. 3T 
516. 86 
389. 95 
140. 60 
635. 01 

385. 47 
703. 66 
789. 78 

054. 48 
111.74 
316.42 
649. 78 
619. 3S 
619. 80 



102.380:911.44 



1,6.52,475.10 
.307, 485. 78 

3. 768. 200. 14 
96,761.29' 
408,813.15- 

6, 233, 735. 46 



42,2(50.83 



47,9.52.09 




14,804,538.70 



3.679,797.59 

358, 065. 0» 

73, 475. 51 

2,208,996.80 



6, 272, 382. 90 



8,951.33 



122,040.71 

1,704.70 

91,709.06 

2,614.43 

.582,063.04 

123,206.13 



47,9.52.09 



6, 320, 334. i9 



8,9.51.33 



206. 385. 60 
71.86 ! 
5,088.02 ! 

"i-i,"2i6.'59"i 



328, 426. 31 

1, 776. 56 

96.797.08 

2,614.43 

596, 279. 63 

123,206.13 



923,338.07 



225.76207 



1,149,100.14 



180 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 8. — Conslruclion of Canal, and capital additions, fiscal year 1920, and totals 
to Jxme SO, i9;^(}— Continued. 



Biiildines (Table No. 20): 

De4°fiiin? and prpliminarj- cxpensos — 
Offices- 
Administration, Balboa 

\dministration, Santa Ro^a 

T?alboa shops 

Balboa terminals 

Sltons — 

Balboa 

Cristobal 

Storeliou-es 

Hotels find mess halls 

Gold quarters 

Silver quarters 

Anron Hospital 

Colon Hosnital 

Dispensaries 

Asylums 

Quarantine station 

Medi' al storehouses 

Mi :ccllaneou5 buildings, b.calth department . 

Post offices 

School'! ou^es 

Courtliou es, police and fire stations, jails, etc 

FluvioTraphs 

Miscellaneous buildings 

Total buildings 

Playgrounds, including 15alboa grand stand 

Sanitary fills , 

Sanitary ditches , 

Landscape improvements 

Waterworks systems: 

C^olon-Cris'tobal 

Panama-Gamboa 

Other Zone systems- 
General.." 

Town^ites 

Total, waterworks systems 

Roadways, streets, and walks: 

Roadways 

Streets 

Walks 

Total, roadways, streets, and walks 

Zone sewaae system: 

Ci eneral . . '. 

Townsite-s 

Total, Zone sewage system 

Real estate: 

For joint land commission expenses 

For Canal construction and flooded areas 

For auxiliary works and buildings 

For depopulation of ib.e Canal Zone 

Total, real estate 

Miscellaneous: 

!• loating caisson , 

Relo alion Panama Railroad 

Investment I'anama Railroad stock 

Concession'-- from Repul lie of I'anama 

Purchase from New i'anama Canal Co 

Total, miscellaneous 

Total, construction of Canal 



Const ruction 
of Cmal, 
totid to 

June 30. 1920. 



,224,847.51 

130, 892. 39 

2.38,553.94 

80,634.42 

,970,490.55 

163, 203. 14 

,009,428.68 

487, 238. 87 

,464.143.75 

672, 242. 62 

,695,220.06 

255,506.90 

161,213.97 

207.994.56 

72, 469. 36 

25.471.15 

169,057.79 

35.982.62 

4S2,.561.68 

100, 884. 23 

13, 709. 02 

470, 886. 52 



16, 132, 633. 73 
54,474.41 

6,38, 732. 11 
157, 248. 23 

34 ,'847. 85 



585, 612. 89 
1,765,222.58 

560,876.89 
131,946.43 



3,043.688.79 



520.118.33 
.527,2.83.83 
90,161.03 



1,137,563.19 



76, 457. 15 
358,089.54 



434,546.69 



354,870.67 

891,722.06 

146,258.94 

2,336.207.63 



3,729,059.30 



347,868.15 
9,800,626.46 

155.818.24 
10,000,000.00 
38,721,690.16 



59,026,003.01 
352,065,542.89 



Capital 

additions. 

total to 

June 30, 1920. 



811,801.92 
43,444.79 

128,484.27 
80,413.00 

292,114.92 

199,821.8:5 



41,285.75 
7, 789. 12 



49, 740. 25 



9,709.55 
1,043.27 



285,250.90 



1,1.50,899.57 



25,921.40 



Total to 
June 30, 1920. 



§1,224,847.51 
130, 892. 39 
2:58, .553. 94 
80, 634. 42 

3,982.292.47 

206,647.93 

1,137,912.95 

567,651.87 

4,756,258.67 

872,064.45 

1,695.220.06 

255,506.90 

161,213.97 

249, 280. 31 

80,2.58.48 

25,471.15 

218,798.04 

.35,982.62 

492,271.23 

101,927.50 

13,709.02 

756, 137. 42 



17,283,533.30 
54,474.41 



636, 732. 11 
183,169.63 

34,847.85 



11,584.68 
1,969.92 



13,554.60 



358,076.82 
52, 295. 47 
27,073.28 



28,864.50 
34,873.50 



63,738.00 



2,100,878.55 



585.642.89 
1,765,222.58 



572.461.57 
133,916.35 



3,057,243.39 



878, 195. 15 
579,579.30 
117,234.31 



1,575.008.76 



105,:521.65 
392,963.04 



498,284.69 



354, 870. 67 

891,722.06 

146,258.94 

2, 336, 207. 63 



3,729,059.30 



347,868.15 
9.800,626.46 

155,818.24 
10,000 000.00 
38,721,690.16 



59,026,003.01 
354,166,421.44 



EEPORT OF AUDITOR. 181 

Table No. 9. — Detail of miscellaneous: receipts, United States funds. 



Receipts involving no appropriatmn evpenditures: 

Subsidies from Panama Railroad Companj- 

Dividends on Panama Railroad stock 

Interest an reequipment Inan 

Interest on first mortgage bond loan 

Interest on public works, Panama and Colon 

Intere„st on Zone water-supply sj'stcms, proportion. 

Interest on bank balances 

Miscellaneous rentals 

Overages 

Forfeitures 

Saha<ring steamship Moselle 

Miscellaneous 



Fiscal year 
1920. 



TotaltJd'ili 



$40,%!. 49 

13,793.01 

50,000.00 

4,592.95 

10.12 

779. 82 



ti, 34 1.13 



Total 

Iteceipts involving expenditures from appropriations: 
Not credited to assets — 

Capital cost, Panama waterworks and sewers. 

Capital cost, Panama pavements 

Capital cost. Colon waterworks and sewers - . . 

Capital cost, Colon pavements 

Tolls 

Licensas and taxes 

Court fees and fines 

Post receipts 

Miscellaneous, Canal Zone 

Profit on business operations i 



116,478.52 



Sfi3 1,875. 00 

344,945.00 

32fl,79<).ll 

152,395.16 

402,270.49 

123.991.09 

73, 147. 30 

243,213.03 

520. 82 

807.82 

210.. 50 

6,495.54 



2,300, 701. 8tj 



16, 

13, 

13, 

8, 493. 

15. 

27; 

109, 
358, 



22;}. 55 
656.42 
141.07 
036. 07 
082.56 
.354.05 
694.45 
217.48 
836. 90 
199.05 



Total 9,058,441.60 



Credits to assets: 

Saie of property 

Sale of irench material and equipment 

Sale of Panama Canal building in city of Panama . 

Sale of water 

Mess accounts 

Hospita 1 receipts 

Quarantine receipts 

Laundry receipts 

Rental of lands and buildings 

Rentals, miscellaneous 

Telegraph and telephone receipts 

Hotels and messes 

Hotel coupon books 

Corral receipts 

labor furnished Panama Railroad Company 

Other labor furnished 

Repayments, equipment loan 

Repayments, first mortgage bond loan 

Sa le of Panama Railroad stock 

Miscellaneous 

Sale of construction material and equipment 

Profit on business operations i 

Forfeitures by contractors 



Total 

Grand total. 



Miscellaneous receipts deposited in I^'nited States Treasury 

Cash on hand June 30, 1920 ". 

Amount of water rentals, Panama and Colon, credited to miscellaneous 



receipts . 



Amount of water rentals, Panama and Colon, deposited as miscellaneous 
receipts 

Profit on business operations, 1920, not transferred to miscellaneous 



receipts 



Unpaid bills 

Total. 



329. 19 



174,440.69 
(118,512.92) 



56, 256. 96 
9,231,177.08 



833, 152. 66 
738,973.61 



84,158.03 

70,475.19 

78,323.89 

73,933.97 

33,303,581.67 

68,376.70 

192, 138. 72 

516,045.27 

5,186.57 

358, 199 05 



34,660,419.06 



850 
123 
80 



24 

7 

41- 

137 

3 

758 

32 

8' 

180: 

27, 

1,387: 

300. 

1, 

93: 
1,016; 



,500.11 
992.69 
000.00 
255.43 
879.48 

,992 68 
900.53 
382.01 
427.24 
822. 99 
547. .35 
470.34 
238.28 
628. 56 
336.97 
4-19.55 
714.92 
000.00 
300. 00 
805.47 
202. 18 



12,293.52 



5,215,140.30 
42,176,261.22 

41,654,083.70 
147,664.86 



94,179.05 

239,686 13 
40,617.48 



42,176,261.22 



> Profits on business operations pri.)r to Juiy 1, 1919, transferred from miscellaneous receipts credited t' 
assets, to miscellaneous receipts not credited to assets. 



182 THE PAITAMA CANAL. 

Table No. 10. — Detail of equipment. 
Floatinpr ecinipmert: 

Stcam-^hirs Ancon and Cristobal $2, 164, 357. 31 

Colliers Ulysses and Achilles 2, 029, 232. 05 

Tua;s and supply boats 916, 5SI . .54 

Launches 1S3, OH. 90 

Dredges 1, 224, 666. 60 

Barges 1,072,761.76 

Floating cranes Ajax and Hercules 906, 212.71 

Miscellaneous floating equipment 182] 295. 36 

Total floating equipment $8,679, 119. Z. 

Other equipment: 

Automobiles and trucks 215, 254. 18 

Cranes 208, 977. 02 

Motor cars 11, 250. 00 

Road rollers 25, 281. 00 

Miscellaneous 83, 294. 21 

Tof al other equipment 144, 0.56. 41 

Machinery and tools: 

Eleci iical division 1, 398. 39 

Mimicipal engineering division 58, 209. 17 

Mechanical division 377, 070. 15 

Building division 41, 043. 38 

Subsist ence 102, 504. 52 

Panama Canal press 2, 831. 57 

Total machinery and tools 582, 057. 18 

Total 9,805,232.82 

Table No. 11. — Detail of work in progress. 

Uncompleted work, mechanical division $758, 744. 6', 

Uncompleted work, other divisions 179, 217. 8> 

Total 937,962.46 

Table No. 12. — Detail of material and supplies. 

Balboa St ore $3,841,805.25 

Cristobal store 830, 888. 41 

Paraiso store 6.53, 582 66 

Medical store 131, 021. 15 

Stationery store, administration building 22,472 85 

Prinf ing-plani store 109, 605. 55 

Fuel oil 25,959.10 

District quartermaster's stores: 

Cristobal $6, lUO. 00 

Gatun 28,510.02 

Paraiso-I'edro Miguel 1, 115. 12 

Balboa- Ancon 3, 465. 93 

39,191.07 

Total quartermaster's stores 85, 854, 526. 04 

Containers in transit i 23, 565. 21 

Obsolete store 27, 365. 11 

Material drawn by divisions not yet charged to work 546, 618. 23 

Total 6,204,944.16 

Less price adjustments, unpaid invoices, etc 333,239 68 

Net book value, material and supplies 5,871,704.48 

Table No. 13. — Detail of assets received from the Canal Zone Government. 

Waterworks $10, 500. 00 

Sewers 8, 000. 00 

Roads.. 451,887.50 

School buildings 72, 115. 00 

Books and stationery 2, 289 87 

Total 544,792.37 

' Ci edit. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 183 

Table No. 14. — Detail of assets transferred to other departments of the United States 

Government. 

To Army on Canal Zone: 
Waterworks system — 

Las Cascadas $14, 250. 00 

Emrdre 278, 300. 00 

Culebra 12, 000. 00 

Corozal 6, 500. 00 

Total waterworks $311, 050. 00 

Sewer systems — 

Las Cascadas 11, 500. 00 

Empire 23, 500. 00 

Culebra 9, 500. 00 

Corozal 6, 000. 00 

Total sower system 50, 500. 00 

Roads- 
Las Cascadas 50,700.00 

Empire 140, 500. 00 

Culebra 40,000.00 

Corozal 18, 000. 00 

Total roads 249,200.00 

Buildings- 
Las Cascadas 126, 416. 00 

Empire 369, 749. 17 

Culebra 244,580. 41 

Corozal 206,552.25 

Gat un 50, 782. 65 

Cristobal 13, 248. 00 

Margarita Island 375. 50 

Toro Point 24, 076. 24 

— — 1, 035, 786. 22 

Cbasjres River tract 69, 861. 99 

Railroad tracks, Fort Amador 8, 773. 00 

Total transferred to Army 1, 725, 171. 21 

To State Department, le2;ation building, Panama City 22, 256. 00 

To Alaskan En?;ineering Commission— Equipment 337, 912. 21 

To Army and Navy on Canal Zone, boathouse, Colon 2, 003. 25 

Total 2,087,-342.67 

Table No. 15. — Detail of Panama Canal equipment and property operated by the Panama 

Railroad. 

Locomotives S309, 468. .85 

Steel flat cars 257, 934. 62 

Oliver dump cars 225, 332. 90 

Lidgerwood flat cars 85, 307. 22 

Floating ecjuipment (barges and launches) 132, 813. 26 

Other miscellaneous equipment 50, 711. 73 

Wooden dock, Cristobal 40, 000. 00 

Steamships: 

Panama S400, 000. 00 

Colon 400, 000. 00 

Caribbean 157, 304. 60 

Culebra 109, 325. 00 

1,066,629.60 

TotSl 2,168,198.18 

Table No. 16. — Detail of Panama Railroad equipment and property operated by The 

Panama Canal. 

Floating equipment $35, 035. 00 

Other equipment 19, 1,36. 72 

Buildings and structures 414, 554. 78 

Concrete dock, Balboa 373, 742. 10 

Total 842,468.60 



184 THE PANAMA CANAL,. 

Tabt^e No. 17. — Detail of resei'vcs for gratuity, depreciation, and repairs. 

Gratuity: 

Buiidinp di\ ision $1 16, 9"9. 82 

Electrical di ision S6, 749. 47 

Mechanical di ision 239, 300. 08 

Municipal enrineering division 47,360. 92 

Forti Ications 34, 2«0. 06 

Miscellaneous 288,940. 06 



Depreciation: 
Equii ment — 

Tui's and supply boats 306, 833. 92 

Launches 53, 095. 99 

])red~es 291 , 691. 24 

Barres 398, 121. 97 

Floatinr cranes 121 , 662. 69 

Miscellaneous 50, 627. 93 

Crane hoat La Valley Sll,932. 28 

Graders 1 , 2 . and 3 2«, 406. 09 

Pile dri< er No. 2 1, 430. 79 

Coal hoist No. 1 1 , 264. 60 

Drill bari'c Teredo No. 2 ."^31 . 25 

Air compressor 7, 062. 92 



$813,591.01 



Total, floatin? equipment 1, 222, 033. 74 

Automobile? and trucks 94, 297. 38 

Cranes 71 , 389. 45 

Railroad motor cars 2, 590. 12 

Road rollers 13,648.14 

Miscellaneous 8, 789. 75 

Total other equipment 190, 714. 84 

Buildincs— 

Balboa store 67,390. 02 

Cristobal store 2,414.30 

Cristobal oil house 1 , 650. 00 



Total buildings 71,454.32 

Structures and plants — 

Mount Plor e fuel-oil plant 60, 432. 76 

Balboa fuel-oil plant 81,335.00 

Balboa dry dock 120, 000. 00 

Pier No. 18, Balboa 47, 030. 50 

Transmission system 649, 02S. 70 

Total structures and plants 957, 826. 96 

Repairs: 

Equinment— 

Tu'-s and supply boats 97, 098. 02 

Launches 1 1 , 888. .59 

Dred-es i 54,965.66 

BaTes 135, 870. 85 

Floatiu' cranes 166,383. 64 

Miscellaneous 1 8, 175. 05 

Total floatin? equipment 334,323.21 

Railroad motor cars 1, 846. 16 

Road rollers 87. 24 

Miscellaneous (Balboa shops) 7, 932. 54 

Total other equipment 9, 865. 94 

Buildings— 

Balboa shoos 1 15, 802. 57 

Ball )oa store 22,2"0. 73 

Cristol lal store 23, 781 . 80 

Cristobal oil house 1, 597. 66 



Total buildinis 31, 827. 62 

Structures and plants — 

Balboa dry dock i 5,946. 10 

Balboa fuel-oil plant 66, .587. 20 

Mount Ho'^e fuel-oil nlant 57, 507. 51 

Balboa and Mount Hope baseball parks 812. 35 

Transmission system 1 10, 708. 99 

Total structures and plants 108,251. 97 

Grand total 3, 739,889. 61 

Recapitulation: 

firatuity 813, .591. 01 

Depreciation — 

Equinment $1 , 412, 748. 58 

Structures 1, 029, 281. 28 

; 2,442,029.86 

Repairs— 

Equioment 344, 1«;9. 15 

Structures 140, 079. 59 

484,268.74 

» Credit. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 185 

Table No. 18. — Statement of equipment, material, and swpplies paid from construction 
funds {bond issue) but not directly charged to Canal construction accounts. 

Material and supplies on hand July 1 , 1915 U, 374, 860. 10' 

Less doducted tor operation and maintenance 2, 225, 000. 00 

2,149,800.10 
List of equipment purchased from construction funds with the 
value at which trans. erred for use in the maintenance and 
operation ol The Panama Canal: 

S. S.Ancon $728,271.88 

S.S.Cristobal 716,085.43 

Total, steamships W, 444, 357. 31 

Tugs and supply boats: 

Berdena . .' 3,400.00 

Bohio 20,064.00 

Coeoli 20,416.00 

Coco Solo 9, 148. 70 

Empire 28,463.50 

Enguiecr 46, 013. 64 

Gatun 11,692.80 

Gorgona 158, 921 . 65 

La Boca 19,747.20 

Mariner 21, 511 . 80 

Miratlorcs 36,496. 7.3 

Porto Bello 29,000.00 

Sanidad 4,675.00 

Tabernilla 156,922.79 

Total, tugs 584, 473. 83 

Launches: 

Aspui vail 4, 5:37. 24 

Atlantic 4, 475. 13 

Bari )acoas II 4, 562. 97 

Bonita 750.00 

Cruces 4,419.25 

Flamengo 1, 850. 60 

,Lirio...! 1,545.00 

Luiz 217.97 

Margaret 1,400. 00 

Pacific 4,475.00 

Patrol 5,484.00 

Patrique 1,300.00 

Priscilla 4, 414. 7o 

Psyche 3,000.00 

Santa Rita 4,620.00 

Search 6,630.00 

Snail 625.00 

No 7 500.00 

^o.S.'.'.'.. '..'.'...'. 500.00 

No 9 1,000.00 

No! lo'. ■.■.■.■.■.■.■.".".■.■.■. ■-...! 1,000.00 

No 11 1,200.00 

No! 12: ;.■;.■ .■.■.■.'.■.■ .'.'.■ 1,400.00 

No. 26 2,890.00 

Tota! . launches 62, 790. 91 

Clapet No. 7 5, 959. 00 

Dredges: 

Cascadas 446, o84. 10 

Gamboa 273,046.56 

Marmot 18,759.84 

Paraiso 273,016.60 

No. 83 .34,689.60 

No 84 30,536.00 

Noiss!!!;;!;!;;!!;!!;;;;! 70,125.00 

Total,dredges 1,146,7.57.70 

Barges: 

U.S. No. 3 7,650.00 

17 9,850.00 

18 11,000.00 

20 11,000.00 

36 1,000.00 

38 300.00 

39"" 300.00 

46 8,064.00 

48 9,680.00 

49 9,680.00 

50 9,680.00 

57 2,488.20 

91 678.60 

92 127.50 

93 150.00 

95 403.01 

96 2,400.00 

07 2,245.76 



186 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table No. 18. — Statement of equipment, material, and supplies paid from construction 
funds {bond issue) but not directly charged to Canal construction accounts — Continued. 

B arges— Cont inuo d . 

U.S. No. 98 $2,042.00 

101 7,804.04 

102 7,804.04 

103 7,804.04 

104 7,804.04 

105 7,804.04 

106 7, 804. 04 

107 10,000.00 

108 7,804.04 

109 7, 804. 04 

116 7, 313. 80 

117 7, 313. 80 

118 7, 313. 80 

119 7,313.80 

121 7, 776. 00 

122 7, 776. 00 

123 8,5.53.60 

131 67,254.19 

132 67, 254. 19 

1.33 67,254.19 

1.34 67,254.19 

135 67,254.19 

136 67, 254. 19 

137 71, 828. 69 

1.38 71,828.69 

139 71,828.70 

140 78, 897. 31 

141 89,394.84 

142 36, 432. 64 

143 36,432.64 

144 36,432.64 

145 36,432.64 

146 4,785.89 

147 4,785.89 

148 4,785.89 

170 2,000.00 

171 4,000.00 

176 1,000.00 

179 2,160.00 

187 300.00 

202 255.00 

217 935.00 

220 300.00 

222 255.00 

Total, barges $1,173,134.78 

Floating cranes: 

Ajax 448,335.79 

Hercules 457,876.92 

Total , floating cranes 906, 212. 71 

Miscellaneous floating equipment: 

Drillbarge Teredo, No. 3 15,000.00 

Compresser barge No. 27 20,848.00 

Derrick barge No. 161 19,838.10 

Coal hoist No. 168 2,112.00 

Un .vatering barge No. 169. - 30,076. 85 

Grader No.l... 43,538.77 

Grader No.S. 28,690.30 

Crane boat La Valle 19,503.00 

Floating pile driver Bruiser 2,550.00 

Total, miscellaneous floating equipment 182, 157.02 

Cranes: 

No. 1 400.00 

US. 23... 2,000.00 

24 2,000.00 

25 2,000.00 

27 4,000.00 

28 4,000.00 

32 8,000.00 

34 5,000.00 

35 5,000.00 

36 5,000.00 

37 3,500.00 

42 3,300.00 

43 3,300.00 

60 3,000.00 

61 6,658.00 

63 3,300.00 

65 4,500.00 

66 4,500.00 

61 6,500.00 

62 7,260.30 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 187 

Table No. 18. — Statement of equipment, material, and supplies paid from construction 
funds (bond issue) but not directly charged to Canal construction accounts — Continued. 

Cranes— Continued. 

U.S. 63 $4,550.00 

64 8,000.00 

66 3, 550. 00 

67 3,500.00 

68 5,500.00 

69 5,700.00 

70 6, 800. 00 

71 6,810.00 

72 6,400.00 

73 6,400.00 

75 6,900.00 

76 6,900.00 

77 6,900.00 

78 6,900.00 

79 6,900.00 

80 6,900.00 

81 6,900.00 

82 6,900.00 

83 4,000.00 

84 4,822.00 

Total, cranes $204, 440. 30 

Motor cars: 

No. 1 5, 000. 00 

6 1,500.00 

7 2,000.00 

Total, motor cars 8, 500. 00 

Road rollers: 

No. 2 2,236.00 

3 2,750.00 

4 2,500.00 

6 3,000.00 

7 2,875.00 

8 2,595.00 

9 3,0-5.00 

10 2,750.00 

11 3,0.5.00 

12 3,025.00 

Total, road rollers 27,781.00 

Miecellaneous equipment: 

Pay ear No. 1 1,289.75 

Locomotive 401 400. 00 

403 400.00 

467 400.00 

Pile driver 102 4,800.00 

Total, miscellaneous equipment 7, 289. 75 

Total $5,733,851.31 

Tug Reliance (lost at sea Aug. 2, 1918) 59, 922. 08 

Total 7,943,633.49 

Statement of construction equipment transferred to the Panama Railroad: 
Floating equipment — 

Steamship Panama 400, 000. 00 

Steamship Colon 400, 000. 00 

800, 000. 00 

Dredge Caribbean 157, 304. 60 

Dredge Culebra 109, 325. 00 

266,629.60 

Launches— 

A neon 678. 31 

Taboguilla 2, 284. 72 

Vidette 2,9-0.13 

No. 1355 2,476.05 

8,359.21 

Barges— 

No.l .- 10,000.00 

S 9,047.25 

4 11,177.90 

IS 11,065.00 

19 11,171.31 

26 16,8 8.51 

Z8 5,f87.00 

!9 11,094.50 

S^ 200.00 

47 9,680.00 

149 5,600.00 

150 5,600.00 

1S7 ' 17,012.58 

124,454.05 



188 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 18. — Statement of equipment, material, and supplies paid from construction 
funds (bond issue) but not directly charged to Canal construction accounts — Continued, 

Statement of construction equipment transferri d to the Panama Railroad- 
Continued. 
Rollins; stock— 

43 locomotives S309, 468. 85 

491 steel fiat cars 257, 934. 62 

450 Oliver dump cars. 2'J'5, 332. 90 

194 Lidgerwood flat cars 85, 307. 22 

$878, 043. 6» 

Other equipment — 

2 cranes (Nos. 26 and 40) 8,785.01 

2 plows (Nos. 27 and 28) 400. 00 

2 track shifters (Nos. 5 and 7) 1 , 87?. 00 

3 spreaders ( Nos. 36, 37, 39) 6, 600. 00 

5 steam shovels (Nos. 56, 1 21 , 203, 204, 213) 1 7, 316. 90 

3 unloaders (Nos. 26, 32, 36) 6,000. 00 

Miscellaneous equipment 9, 737. 82 

50,711.73 

Total, transferred to Panama Railroad- 2, 128, 198. 18 

Statement of construction equipment transferred to the Alaskan Engineering 
Commission: 

24 locomotives 95, 138. 88 

7 narrow-gauge locomotives 6, 9'^5. 00 

35 Oliver dump cars 4, 550. 00 

70 Western dump cars 8, 400. 00 

408 Lidgerwood flat cars 150,960. 00 

2 pile drivers (Nos. 2 and 5) 1 , 646. 95 

1 spreader ( No. 43) •. 2, 200. 00 

3 steam shovels (Nos. 54, 111, 130) 5,900.00 

2 unloaders ( Nos. 29 and 38). 2, 400. 00 

Mi-scellancous ... - 59, 791 . 38 

Total, transferred to Alaska. - - 337, 912. 21 

Table No. 19.— Detailed cost, Pier No. 6, Cristobal, to June SO, 1920. 



Surveys-.. 
Designing. 
Testing- 



Preliminary borings linear feet . . 

Final borings do 

Preparing site 

Cleaning around site 

PreUminary work 

Dredging 

Maintenance range ligiits 

Caisson, 6 feet diameter linear feet. . 

Excavation inside caissons cubic yards. . 

Concrete in caissons do — 

Pedestals each . . 

Bumping posts 

Column anchor bolts 

Moormg hitts 

Silver toilets 

Winch motor anchors 

Fender system 

Arches and large girders, concrete floor system: 

Placing forms square feet 

Placing reinforcing pounds. . 

Placing concrete cubic yards . . 

Struts pounds. . 

Floor beams 

Placing forms square feet . . 

Placing reinforcing pounds . . 

Placing concrete cubic yards.. 

Slab — Concrete floor system: 

Placing forms square feet . . 

Placing reinforcing pounds . . 

Placing concrete cubic yards. . 

Apron tracks 

Temporary water lines 

Temporary power lines 

Drains 



Quantity. 



2, 924. 6 
6,603 



22,610 
14,117.01 
22,005.8 
190 



Electrical work in floor 

Handling miscellaneous material account, door system 

Reinforced concrete shed (columns except in end wall): 

Placing forms square feet. . 

Placing reinforcing pounds . . 

Placing concrete cubic yards. . 



206,058 
3,417,640 
1,429,880 
1,565,795 

2.32,820 
1,910,440 
6, 609. 4 

134,413 
600,640 
6,953.8 



42,580 

107,600 

764 



Amount. 



Unit cost. 



$17, 196. 20 

32,841.98 

1,448.37 

1,514.78 

2,496.69 

10, 424. 48 

501. 75 

49, 425. 58 

4,627.99 

198. 26 

335,291.67 

86,6.34.51 

122, 013. 84 

1,3.38.93 

309.50 

2,946.14 

4,270.77 

540. 71 

1,018.42 

37,961.05 



50, 306. 06 
93,834.73 
63,992.16 

25,330.19 

39,735.97 

67,935.71 

16,416.17 

557. 09 

481.77 

1,297.81 

29, 176. 18 

10.00 

8, 690. 57 
7,344.34 
10.132.79 



$0.5179 
.3781 



14. 8294 
6. 1369 
5. 5446 
7.0470 



96,289.93 


. 46730 


147, .567. 56 


.04318 


95,957.30 


.06710 


123,957.52 


.07917 



.21610 
. 04912 
9. 6820 

. 18850 

.06616 

9. 76960 



.2041 

.0683 

13.2628 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 189 

Table No. 19.— Detailed cost, Pier No. 6, Cristobal, to June SO, ^920— Continued. 



Trusses: 

Placing forms square feet. . 

Placine reinforcing pounds . . 

Placing concrete cubic yards. . 

Erection of trusses 

■roncrete— ?ide walls (girders and pilasters): 

Placing forms square feet. . 

Placing rcmforcing .poimds. . 

Placing concrete cubic yards.. 

■roncrete— end walls: 

Placing forms .square feet . . 

Placing reinforcing poimds . . 

Placing concrete cubic yards. . 

Scaffolding 

Roofs: 

Placing forms square feet . . 

Placing reinforcing poimds. . 

Placing concrete cubic yards.. 

Barrett specification roofing 

Brick payment: 

Brick 

Steel doors: 

Fnd doors 

Side doors 

Miscellaneous: 

Windows and louvers 

Skylights 

Telephone and transformer booths 

Gold toilets 

Wheel guards 

Overhead cranes 

Crane tracks 

Trolleys for cranes 

Electrical work for lighting system 

Plant credits 



Total, division cost, Pier No. 6. 



Quantity. 



10.3, fi40 

971,795 

1,852 



80,078 

240,175 

1,502 

23,276 

43,420 

298 



123,372 

164,000 

1,623 



Amount. 



Unit cost. 



$13,917.96 

45, 831. 02 

20, 607. 89 

7,500.13 

27,501.38 
13,617.64 
25,263.24 

7,987.77 

3,596.90 

4, 156. 47 

646. 57 

18,561.24 

9,888.21 

25,271.10 

21,576.08 

1,320.44 

2,486.90 
49,421.04 j 

6,968.33 

1,093.03 

1,569.31 

2, 357. 76 

11,345.07 

3,810.77 

7, 137. 51 

398. 74 

8U.34 

(1,134.30) 



1,925,545.01 



$0. 1343 
. 04716 
11.1274 



.3434 

.a567 

16. 8197 

.3432 

.0828 

13. 9479 



.1504 

.0603 

15. 5706 



Table No. 20. — Detail of buildings, fiscal year 1920, and to June 30, 1920. 
[Amounts include Canal overhead.] 



Fiscal year 
1920. 



Total to June 
30, 1920. 



Anemometer tower, Balboa Heights. 

Asylums: 

Corozal asylum buil'ings , 

Tuberculosis ward, Corozal 

Chicken house, Corozal , 

Compost pit, Corozal 

Dairy bull in-^s, Corozal 

Dairy she 1, Corozal 

Guinea pi'? hou.se, Corozal , 

Gold quarlers, Corozal , 

Ho? sheis, Corozal , 

Nurses' quarters, Corozal 

Palo Seco buildings 



$257. 59 
13,481.48 



I 1,227.28 
"2,"96i.'65' 



Total, asylums. 



15,413.44 



Band stand's: 
Cristobal . 
Gatun... 
Paraiso . . 



Total, band stands. 

Boathouse, Gatun 

Boy Scouts, Parai.so 

Cemetery, Corozal 



Churches: 

Ancon — Episcopal. 
Ancon— Catholic . . . 
Cristobal— Union. . , 



Total, churches. 



35.91 



975. 00 
1,100.00 



2,075.00 



$1,987.45 

105,160.40 

35,915.82 

1,884.55 

784.05 

14,104.06 

26,487.23 

342.97 

2,443.12 

14,!^65.68 

2,901.65 

46,833.90 



251,723.43 



471.25 
375. 00 
640. 25 



1,486.50 

9,361.20 

.210.00 

2,010.14 



975.00 
1,100.00 
1,275.00 



3,350.00 



' Credit, 



190 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table No. 20. — Detail of buildings, fiscal year 1920, and to June SO, 1920 — Continued. 



Fiscal year 
1920. 



Total to June 
30, 1920. 



Clubhouses: 

Balboa, main buiMin? 

Balboa, motion-picture hall. . 

Cristobal 

(^atun 

Gatun, silver employees' 

La Boca, silver employees' . . . 

Paraiso 

Pe:lro Mi-ruel 

Red Tank, silver employees'. 
Ancon (includes lodge hall) . . 



114,452.52 



3,714.00 



$22,042.72 
16,120.56 
19,250.00 
15,750.00 
11,345.34 

8,2.56.38 
18,522.99 
25,025.29 
11,538.21 

4,800.00 



Total, clubhouses. 



18, 166. 52 



1,52,651.50 



Corral buildings: 

Ancon 

Gatim 

Paraiso 

Pedro Miguel. 
Cristobal 



2,491.46 



18,000.00 

3,115.50 

200.00 

2, 433. 64 

21,256.23 



Total, corral buildings. 



2,491.46 



45,005.37 



Courthouses, fire and police stations: 

Courthouse, Cristobal 

Fire stations— 

Ancon 

Balboa, concrete 

Mount Hope, Cristobal 

Cristobal 

Gatun 

La Boca 

Paraiso 

Pedro Miguel 



12,650.13 



Total, fire stations. 



Police Stat ions — 

Ancon 

Balboa... 

Cristobal 

Gamboa , 

Oatim 

New Gatun... 

Paraiso 

Pedro Miguel. 



Total, police stations , 

Total, courthouses, fire and police stations . 

Dispensaries: 

Ancon, concrete 

Balboa, concrete 

Gatun, concrete 

Pedro Miguel, concrete 

Garage, Pedro Miguel dispensary 



Total, dispensaries 

Fuel shed, district quartermaster, Balboa Heights 

Garages: 

Motor truck, Ancon corral 

Ancon- Balboa- Balboa Heights district 

Railroad motor cars, Balboa Heights 

Cristobal-Colon district 

•iatun 

Pedro Miguel district 



Total, garages. 



Hospital, Ancon: 

Administration building, concrete.. 
Bakeshop and storeroom, concrete. 

Boiler house, concrete 

Crematory, concrete 

( iara<;c, concrete 

Isolation ward, concrete 

Kitchen and mess, concrete 

Laboratorv, concrete 



18,900.00 

4,398.75 

20,655.88 

680. 00 

12,650.13 

2,030.00 

318.66 

520.00 

2,033.27 



12,650.13 



43,286.69 



12,650.13 



4,620.00 
12, 725. 81 

6,820.00 
760.00 

4,200.00 
520.00 
195.00 

9,900.00 



39, 740. 81 



101,927.50 



545. 72 



545. 72 



62,856.48 
19,038.11 
38,650.61 
40,668.77 
545. 72 



161,759.69 



3, 778. 7ft 



4, .553. 37 

2, 573. 20 

414.57 



23, 153. 05 



21,442.34 
57,221.76 
13,011.58 
13,541.68 
9, 4S9. 56 
10,069.25 



124, 776. 17 



11,591.32 



192,611.24 
11,591.32 
17,630.57 
11,857.49 
6, 817. 57 
134,781.13 
141,841.52 
107,331.09 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 191 

Table No. 20.— Detail of buildings, fiscal year 1920, and to June SO, i9:20— Continued^ 



Fiscal year 
1920. 



Total to June 
30, 1920. 



Hospital, Ancon— Continued. 

Main stairway, concrete 

Nurses' quarters, concrete 

Passageway, concrete 

Superinten-ient's quarters, concrete 

Wards, sections A, B, C, and D, concrete. 

Total, hospital, Ancon 

Hospital, Colon: 

Garage 

Morgue, concrete 

Nurses' quarters, concrete 

Wards, concrete , 



$1,890.42 
3, 839. 99 



17,321.73 



6,861.36 



Total, hospital. Colon 

Hotels and mess halls: 

Tivo'i vitchen, concrete, Ancon 

Tivoli hotel, frame. A neon 

Linen room, Tivo'i hotel, frame, Ancon 

Restaurant, concrete, ^ neon 

Restaurant , concrete, Ba.boa 

Hotel, frame, Balboa , 

Restaurant, concrete, Cristobal 

Mess hall and icitchen, frame. Camp Bierd, Cristobal.., 

Laborers' kitchen, frame, Camp Bierd, Cristobal , 

Coolc shed. Fast Indian, frame. Camp Bierd, Cristobal . 

Mess hall, frame, Gatun 

Kitchens, laborers', frame, Gatun , 

Kitchen, laborers', frame. La Bora , 

Kitchen, European laborers', frame, Paraiso 

Restaurant, concrete, Pedro Miguel 

Aspinwall Hotel, frame, Taboga 

Landing stage, Aspinwall Hotel 

Total, hotels and mess halls 

Incinerators: 

Balboa 

Cristobal 



6,861.36 



2,469.87 



2, 469. 87 



49, 788. 43 
121,080.87 



Total, incinerators . 



170, 869. 30 



Larvacide plant, Ancon 

Lighthouse building, Gatun 

Lodge halls: 

Ba'boa 

Gatun 

Gatun, silver employees' 

La Bor'a^ silver employees' 

Pedro Miguel 

Total, lodge halls 

Marine division dock building, Gatun. 
Markets: 

Cristobal 

Gatun 

Paraiso 



10, 890. 14 



2,025.55 
'5,'326.'66' 



7, 345. 55 



Total, markets. 



Meter-reading station, Pedro Miguel 

Offices: 

Administration Building, Santa Rosa, Ancon 

Municipal engineering division, Ancon 

Shops, Balboa 

Terminal, Balboa 

Sanitary inspector and dentist, Ba'boa 

Administration building, Ba boa Heights 

District quartermaster, Balboa Heights 

Customs, Cristobal 

Depot Commissary, Cristobal 

Depot quartermaster, Cristobal 

Municipal bui'din?, Cristobal 

Muniripal engineering and electrical divisions, Cristobal. 

Sanitary inspector, Culebra 

Sanitary inspector, Gatun 

Dredging division, Paraiso 

Sanitary inspector, Paraiso 

District quartermaster, Pedro Miguel 

Hydrographer, Pedro Miguel 

Total, offices 



81.5,287.03 
143,862.38 
35,003.29 
33, 339. 81 
840, 265. 62 



1,695,220.06 



6, 861. 36 

5, 107. 20 

38,277.94 

205,260.40 



255,506.90 



56, 146. 01 

180,300.00 

1,329.99 

79,887.38 

80,771.75 
8, 100. 00 

8(',517.21 
7,084.04 
1,140.00 
121.50 
6,463.81 
1,200.00 
8,514.10 
357. 50 

38,334.51 
6,583.50 
4, 800. 57 



567, 651. 87 



180, 106. 23 
121,080.87 



301,187.10 



14, 700. 65 
22,619.03 



1,800.00 
7,000.00 
4, 400. 22 
1,776.92 
17,636.16 



32, 613. 30 



207. 81 

1,382.50 

1,330.00 

660. 00 



3,372.50 



178. 33 



297. 50 



62.35 

130, 892. 39 

1,177.04 

238, 553. 94 

80,634.42 

28,248.56 

1,224,847.51 

19, 166. 24 

300.00 

5, 850. 00- 

3,010.00 

796. 96 

4,517.50 

1,800.00 

1,500.00 

480.00 

390.00 

342. 72 

297. 50 



475.83 



1,742,804.78 



192 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table No. 20.— Detail of buildings, fiscal year 1920, and to June SO, i9;g0— rContinued. 



Fiscal year 
1920. 



Total to June 
30, 1930. 



Post offices, frame: 

."^ncon 

Balboa 

Corozal 

Cristobal 

Culebra 

Oatiui 

Pedro Miguel . . 



S4, 560. 00 
9,900.00 
1,592.62 
7,930.00 
5, 700. 00 
4,200.00 
2, 100. 00 



Total, post offices, frame . 



35,982.62 



■Quarantine stations: 

Ba;boa 

Colon 

Kitchen, Colon quarantine station . 



S817. 20 



63,392.70 

16,048.58 

817. 20 



Total, quarantine stations. 



817. 20 



0,258.48 



•Quarters, gold: 

Two-family, concrete. . 
Four-famiiy, concrete. 

Bachelor, concrete 

Frame 



3.30 
'55" 303.' 62 



200,312.35 

1,316,472.43 

75, 819. 06 

3,163,654.83 



Total, quarters, gold . 



55, 306. 92 



4,756,258.67 



•Quarters, silver, frame 

Scales, track. Mount Hope, Cristobal. 



59, 886. 81 



872,064.45 
1,750.00 



Schoolhouses: 

Ancon, white, concrete 

Ancon, white, frame 

Balboa, mamial training, frame 

Balboa, white (lower floor of lodge hall) . 

Balboa, domestic science, frame 

Balboa, white, concrete 

Cristobal, white, concrete 

Empire, colored, frame 

Gatun, white, concrete 

Paraiso, colored, frame 

Pedro Miguel, white, concrete 

Red Tank, colored, frame 



Total, schoolhouses. 
Seamen's homes 



84,947.14 
5,713.60 
1,194.11 
4, 150. 39 
2,213.04 
179,768.60 
109, .595. 77 
2,327.45 

52,643.88 
1,582.60 

51,592.95 
2,255.00 



15,305.39 



497,984.83 
17,505.39 



Shops: 

District quartermaster, carpenter shop, Balboa 

Electrical division, Balboa 

Marine division, Balboa 

Mechanical division, Balboa 

Pattern shop and mess hall, Balboa 

Mechanical division, Cristobal 

District ciuartermaster, Gatim 

Electrical divi 4on, Gatun 

Electrical division, shop and store, Gatun 

Marine divi-;ion, < iatun 

Municipal engineering division, plumbing shop, Gatun 

Dredging division, Paraiso 

Me?hanical division, Paraiso 

Barher, Pedro Miguel 

District quartermaster, carpenter shop, Pedro Miguel 

District q uartermaster, shop and store, Pedro Miguel 

Municipal engineering division, blacksmith shop, Pedro Miguel - 



1,275.00 



11,801.92 



43,444.79 



Total, shops 



56,521.71 



i^torehouses: 

Medical, concrete, Ancon 

Electrical, concrete, Balboa 

P'xplosives, Balboa 

Forage, Balboa 

General, concrete, Balboa 

Launch supplies, Balboa 

I-,urater, concrelo, Halboa 

Oil, concrete, Halboa 

Oil and empty drums, Balboa 

Paint, concrete, Halboa 

Hoclamation shed, Balboa 

Survevs, concrete, Halloa Heights 

Drv dock, building No. 330, Cristobal. . 
Dry dock, building No. 5099, Cristobal. 
Forage, Cristobal 



1,787.62 



3,234.13 



1,275. CO 

423. 50 

122.61 

3,982,292.47 

64,245.87 

206, 647. 93 

3,300.00 

6<7.50 

2,147.75 

1,050.00 

1,:'80.00 

4,678 81 

2,7i8.34 

180. 00 

220. 00 

5, 472. 24 

210.00 



.5, 445. .50 



24,868.59 
' 13,176.' 97' 



4 277,012.02 



25,471.15 

92,573 84 

507. 25 

6, 929. 84 
587, .558. 98 

1,8''2. 13 
166,688 58 
47,214.56 
24,868.59 
30,671.14 
14,923.44 

5,213.30 
16,695.00 
27,000.00 

4,500.00 



KEPORT OF AUDITOR. 193 

Table No. 20. — Detail of buildings, fiscal year 1920, and to June 30, 1920 — Continued. 



Storehouses— Continued. 

Fumigating supplies, Cristobal 

General, concrete, Cristobal 

Obsolete, Cristobal 

Oil, Cristobal 

Panama Railroad, mechanical division, and supply department, con- 
crete, Cristobal 

Printing plant, Cristobal 

Printing plant, addition, Cristobal 

Storage shed, building No. 3337, Cristobal store 

Storage shed, building No. 3341, Cristobal store 

Storage shed for obsolete material, Cristobal 

Dynamite, amboa 

Fuse, Gamboa 

General, Gatun 

• Dredge parts, Paraiso 

Dredging division, Paraiso 

General, Paraiso 

District quartermaster, Pedro Miguel 



Fiscal year 
1920. 



Total, storehouses 103, 637. 90 



Tile plant, Ancon . . . 
Toilets, Gatun locks. 



Total, buildings 

Charged to— 

Canal construction 

Maintenance and operation. 

Sanitation 

Civil government 



Total . 



S2S3. 14 



50, 800. 55 
"2,' 750 .'66' 



1,291.40 



582,240.94 



246, 487. .35 

278, 776. 82 

56, 855. 13 

121.64 



582, 240. 94 



Total to June 
30, 1920. 



§2,471.85 

49,184.26 

6,270.00 

5, 800. 00 

50, 800. 55 

16,. 327. 50 

5, 857. 47 

342. 00 

342. 00 

5, 859. 87 

4,. 3.32. 56 

1,841.37 

9, 7.50. 00 

5, 558. 70 

1,000.00 

6,000.00 

170. 00 



1,224,54.5.83 



6,210.00 

4,277.83 



17,269,824.28 



16,120,894.10 

1,047,018.74 

93,128.01 

8,783.43 



17,269,824.28 



Table No. 21. — Detailed cost power producing and transmitiing system, fiscal year 1920, 

and to June SO, 1920. 





Fiscal vear 
1920. 


To June 30, 
1920. 


Gatun hydroelectric power plant: 




$574,912.79 






54, 862. 07 


Operating machinerv 


$3,393.97 


771,539.90 






Total division co'st.:^. . :.-.-.rr.n.-. . 


3,393^.97 


1,401,314.76 






Miraflores steam-electric power plant: 

Building and sitf 




233. 629. 74 


Operating machinerv < 




27, 448. 90 








Totnl, division cost 




261,078.64 








Power system: 

Transformer substations — 

Balboa.. 


1,689.70 
1,457.62 


291,087.76 


Cristobal 


332, 160. 98 




23,775.03 


Gatun . . . ... 


4,055.23 


460, 9.53. 25 


Gold Hill 


1.696.77 




833.04 


3.59; 946. 69 


Transmission line. .. 


1,108,692.59 


Distribution and duct system 


53,426.80 
14,111.99 
6,116.41 


495. 136. 56 




359, ISO. 20 


Street lighting — townsites 


83,701.99 






Total, division cost 


81,690.79 


3.516,331.82 






Total, division cost, power producing and transmitting system 


85,084.76 


5,178,725.22 


Charged to- 


211, 921. .58 
1126,836.82 


5,093,866.66 


Capital idditions 


84, 858. 56 






Total 


85,084.76 


5,178,725.2? 







SS47— 20- 



-13 



> Credit. 



194 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table No. 22. — Detailed cost, permanent townsites, fiscal year 1920, and to June SO, 1920> 





Balboa-Ancon. 


Cristobal-Colon Beach. 


Gatun. 


Item. 


Fiscal year 
1920. 


To June 30, 
1920. 


Fiscal year 
1920. 


To June 30, 
1920. 


Fiscal year 
1920. 


To June 30, , 
1920. 


Miscellaneous improvements: 
Preliminary and general 




$176,171.18 

10,519.78 

7,903.21 

1,576.79 

282,561.35 


$926.22 


$94,019.31 




$1 330. 09 


Preliminary mainte- 












18.68 


18.68 


















97,602.48 


112,585.65 




3 75. 


General improvements- 
Block A 












19,850.98 


639. 97 


3.4.58.46 




109.10 . 












Total division cost 




498,583.29 

86,737.77 


99,187.35 
9, 918. 74 


210,082.10 
21,064.70 




1,442.94 








261.76 . 










Total cost, miscellane- 




585,321.06 


109, 106. 09 


231.146.8(1 




1,704.70 












Municipal expenses and 
electrical work: 




391,465.59 
82,014.97 
55, 847. 84 

194,681.51 
38, 209. 60 

244,119.74 


48,135.22 
12,613.13 
18,35:3.09 
10,815.01 
4, 530. 88 

6, 877.. 59 


87,783.31 
20,098.41 
29,971.75 
113,478.33 
21,707.55 

92,772.44 




5,469.98 . 


Walks 


$2,042.21 


$748.99 


748. 99 
















1,585.53 
5,154.22 




5,064.72 


Underground duct sys- 


1,264.58 


18,047.95. 






Total division cost 

Panama Canal overhead . 


8,781.96 
878. 19 


1,006,339.25 
164,033.68 


101,324.92 
10,132.48 


365,811.79 
36, 581. 16 


2,013.57 
201.36 


29,331.64 
3,123.41. 


Total cost, municipal 
expenses and elec- 


9,660.15 


1,170,372.93 


111,457.40 


402.392.95 


2,214.93 


32,455.05. 








Total division cost, 


8,781.96 
878. 19 


1,504,922.54 
250,771.45 


200, 512. 27 
20,051.22 


575, 893. 89 
57,645.86 


2,013.57 
201.36 


30,774.58 


Panama Canal over- 
head, grand total 


3,385.17 


Grand total, townsites. 


9,660.15 


1,755,693.99 


220,563.49 | 633,539.75 


2,214.93 


34, 159. 75 


Charged to Canal construc- 


56,864.58 
'47,204.43 


1,698,609.30 
57,084.69 


27,043.48 375.687.03 


3,097.56 
1882.63 


25,855.99 


Charged to capital additions. 


193,520.01 


257, 852. 72 


8,303.76 



I Credit. 



KEPORT OF AUDITOR. 



195 



Table No. 22. — Detailed cost, permanent townsites, fiscal year 1920, and to June 30, 

Z5;?0— Continued. 





La Boca. 


Mount Hope. 


Pedro Miguel. 


Item. 


Fiscal year 
1920. 


To June 30, 
1920. 


Fiscal year 
1920. 


To June 30, 
1920. 


Fiscal j^ear 
1920. 


To June 30, 
1920. 


Miscellaneous improvements: 
Preliminary and general 




$37, 557. 50 
31,869.40 
14,842.53 








$45,884.40 


Preliminary maintenance . 




















22 488 65 


Nursery, Balboa-Ancon. . . 
























787 42 


General improvements- 
Block A 




10,221.73 
2,841.06 




















2 162 61 


















97,332.22 
25, 873. 91 








71 323 08 












21 '.362 53 














Total cost .miscellaneous 




123,206.13 








92,685.61 












Municipal expenses and elec- 
tricalwork: 

Streets 






86,274.29 


$6,274.29 




48, 958. 98 
348 28 


Walks 




6,267.28 
21,404.50 
27,119.75 














20,188.33 
11 921 78 






20.14 


20.14 










17 567 10 


Undergroundductsystem . 


iioi.OQ 


401.09 






$414.51 


10 140 77 








Total division cost 

Panama Canal overhead . . 


401.09 
40.11 


55,192.62 
14,605.39 


6,294.43 
629.45 


6,294.43 
629.45 


414.51 
41.46 


109,131.24 
24,524.64, 


Total cost, municipal 
expenses and electrical 


441.20 


69, 798. 01 


6 923. 88 


6 923. 88 


A^^ 97 


133 655 88 








Total division cost, 
grand total 


401.09 
40.11 


152,524.84 
40, 479. .30 


6,294.43 
629.45 


6,294.43 
629.45 


414.51 
41.46 


180 454.32 


Panama Canal overhead, 
grand total 


45 887. 17 






Grand total, townsites... 


441.20 


193,004.14 


6, 923. 88 


6, 923. 88 


455. 97 


226,341.49 


Charged to Canal construction 




192, 562. 94 
441.20 






11,523.23 
'11,067.26 


192 722 25 


Charged to capital additions... 


441.20 


6, 923. 88 


6, 923. 88 


33,619.24 



1 Credit. 



196 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 22. — Detailed cost, permanent townsites. fiscal year 1920, and to June 30, 

i950— Continued. 





Red Tank. 


Total. 


Item. 


Fiscal year 
1920. 


To June 30, 
1920. 


Fiscal year 
1920 


To June 30, 
1920. 


Miscellaneous improvements: 

Preliminary and general work 






$926. 22 


$354,962.48 








42,389.18 








18.68 


45, 253. 07 


Nursery, Ball^oa-Ancon 






1, 576. 79 


Lot improvements 




$2,194.43 


97,602.48 


398, 132. 60 
10,221.73 


General improvements — -Block A 




Division expense 




182.32 


639.97 


28, 604. 53 












2,376.75 
237.68 


99,187.35 
9, 918. 74 


881,140.38 






155,538.35 












2,614.43 


109, 106. 09 


1,036,678.73 








Municipal expenses and electrical work: 

Streets 




12,394.93 
3,536.67 
2,280.52 
2,216.75 
3,289.43 


54,409.51 
1.5,404.33 
18,353.09 
10,835.15 
6,116.41 
14,111.99 


552,347.08 


Walks 




113,014.60 






129,692.94 


Sewer system 




349, 438. 27 


Street 1 ighting 




85,838.40 






365,487.99 










Total division cost 




23,718.31 

2,371.84 


119,230.48 
11,923.05 


1,595,819.28 






245, 869. 57 








Total cost, municipal expenses and electrical 




26,090.15 


131,153.53 


1,841,688.85 












26, 095. 06 
2, 609. 52 


218,417.83 
21,841.79 


2, 476, 959. 66 






401,407.92 












28,704.58 


240,259.62 


2,878,367.58 








Charged to Canal construction 


};3,070.35 
'3,070.35 


28, 704. 58 


101,599.20 
138,660.42 


2,514,142.09 




364,225.49 







1 Credit. 

Table No. 23. — Dredging excavation — detailed cost per unit of toorlc, fiscal year 1920. 

PACIFIC ENTRANCE— CONSTRUCTION. 



Item. 



Quantity. 



Unit cost. 



Operation, pipeline suction dredges 

Repairs, pipeline suction dredge.s 

Depreciation, pipe-line suction dredees 

Operation, miscellaneous fln:iting equipment... 

Repairs, miscellaneous floating e(|uipme.nt 

Depreciation, miscellaneous floatinc equipment 

Pipe lines 

Dikes 

Surveys 

Division expense 

Total, division cost 



Cubic yards. 
17,800 
17, 800 
17.800 
17, 800 
17,800 
17,000 
17,800 
17,800 
17,800 
17, 800 



$0. 0617 
.0190 
.0033 
.0034 
.0007 
.0002 
.0125 
.0085 
.0046 
.0246 



17, SOO 



,1.385 



Material excavated, all earth. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



197 



Table No. 23. — Dredging excavation — detailed cost j)er unit of worJc, fiscal year 1920- 

Con tinned. 

TERMINAL FACILITIES-BALBOA. 
[Balboa Inner Harbor and reclaiming land— Construction.] 



Item. 



Quantity. 


Unit cost. 


Cubic yards. 




47,550 


$0. 1486 


47,550 


.1179 


47,550 


. 0303 


15,500 


.0912 


15,500 


.0276 


15, 500 


.0045 


47,550 


.0959 


47, .550 


.0937 


47,550 


.0143 


63,050 


.0041 


1 63,050 


.0008 


63,050 


.0003 


15,500 


.0654 


63, 050 


.0185 


63,050 


.0512 


63, 050 


.4991 


53, 050 


.8414 


10, 000 


.1586 


8,500 


.0082 


8,500 


.0159 


8,500 


.0014 


8,500 


.0068 



Dredginij inner harbor: 

Operation, large dipper dredges 

Repairs, large dipper dredges 

Depreciation, large dipper dredges 

Operation, pipe-line suction dredges 

Repairs, pipe-line suction dredges 

Depreciation, pipe-line suction dredges 

Operation, tugs, clapets, and scows 

Repairs, tugs, clapets, and scows 

Depreciation, tugs, clapets, and scows 

Operation, miscellaneous floating equipment 

Repairs, miscellaneous floating equipment 

Depreciation, miscellaneous floating equipment 

Pipe lines 

Surveys 

Division expense 

Total , division cost 

Eartli excavated per cent 

Rock excavated do. . 

Reclaiming land: 

Pipe lines 

Operation, relay pumps 

Maintenance, relay pumps 

Division expense 

Total, division cost 



Table No. 24. — Dredging excavation — Detailed cost of unit of work, fiscal year 1920. 

GAILLARD CUT. 



Item. 



Quantities. 


Unit cost. 


Cubic yards. 




2,050,710 


$0. 0706 


2,050,710 


.0565 


2,050,710 


.0089 


11,000 


1. 5866 


11,000 


.6234 


11,000 


.1047 


2,050,710 


.1206 


2,050,710 


.0723 


2,050,710 


.0013 


2,121,710 


.0079 


2,121,710 


.0019 


2,121,710 


.0004 


33,283 


.9038 


33, 283 


.1359 


33, 283 


.0109 


2,121,710 


.0319 


2,121,710 


.0029 


2,121,710 


.0015 


2,121,710 


.0001 


2,121,710 


. 00002 


11,000 


.1062 


11,000 


.0461 


2,121,710 


.0007 


2,121,710 


.0007 


2,121,710 


.00001 


2,121,710 


.0052 


2,121,710 


.0162 


2,121,710 


.0471 


2,121,710 


.0011 


2,121,710 


.4816 


919,835 


.4336 


1,201,875 


.5664 



Operat ion, large dipper dredges 

Repairs, large dipper dredges 

Depreciation, large dipper dredges , 

Operation, pipe-line suction dredges 

Repairs, pipe-line suction dredges 

Depreciation, pipe-line suction dredges 

Operation, tugs and scows 

Repairs, tugs and scows 

Depreciation, tugs and scows 

Operation, miscellaneous floating equipment 

Repairs, miscellaneous floating equipment 

Depreciation, miscellaneous floating equipment. 

Operation, drill barges 

Repairs, drill barges 

Depreciat ion, drill barges 

Operation, liydraulic graders 

Repairs, hydraulic graders 

Depreciation, hydraulic graders 

Drilling ." 

Blasting .' 

Pipe lines 

Relay pimips 

Channel lights 

Ditching 

Flumes 

Sluicing 

Surveys 

Division expense 

Maintenance of water lines 



Total, division cost. 



Earth excavated . 
Rock excavated . . 



.percent. 
do... 



198 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 24. — Dredging excavation — Detailed cost of unit of uork, fiscal year 1920- 

Continued. 

PACIFIC ENTRANCE— OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 



Item. 



Quantities. 



Unit cost. 



Operation, large dipper dredges 

Repairs, large dipper dredges 

Depreciation, large dipper dredges 

Op.erat ion, pipe-line suet ion dredge 

Repairs, pipe-line suction dredge 

Depreciation, pipe-line suction dredge 

Operation, tugs and scows 

Repairs, tugs and scows 

Depreciation, tugs and scows 

Operation, drill barges 

Repairs, drill barges 

Depreciation, drill barges 

Operation, miscellaneous floating equipment 

Repairs, miscellaneous floating equipment 

Depreciation, mis cellaneous floating equipment . 

Pipe 1 ines 

Dikes. 



Ditching 

Surveys 

Division expense. 



Total, division cost . 



Earth excavated per cent . . 

Rock excavated do 



Cubic yards 

21,300 

21,300 

21,300 

1,543,600 

1,543,600 

1,543,600 

21,300 

21,300 

21,300 

13, 814 

13,814 

13,814 

1,564,900 

1,564,900 

1,564,900 

1, 543, 600 

1, 543, 600 

1,564,900 

1,564,900 

1,564,900 



1,564,900 



1, 546, 900 
18, 000 



$0. 1562 
.1010 
.0163 
.0747 
.0237 
.0044 
.1923 
.2227 
.0304 
1.4414 
.1522 
.0123 
.0039 
.0009 
.0002 
.0213 
.0009 
.0009 
.0058 
.0264 



.1854 



.0115 



PACIFIC INNER HARBOR— MAINTENANCE. 



Dredging inner harbor: 

Operation, large dipper dredges 

Repairs, large dipper dredges 

Depreciation, large dipper dredges 

Operation, pipe-line suction dredges 

Repairs, pipe-line suction dredges 

Depreciation, pipe-line suction dredges 

Operation, tugs and scows 

Repairs, tugs and scows 

Depreciation, tugs and scows 

Operation, miscellaneous floating equipment . . . 

Repairs, miscellaneous floating equipment 

Depreciation, miscellaneous floating equipment 

Pipe lines 

Surveys 

Division expense 

Total, division cost 

Reclaiming land: 

Pipe lines 

Operation relay pimips 

Maintenance 

Division expense 

Total, division cost 



205, 500 



179, 750 


$0. 1687 


179,750 


.1294 


179, 750 


.0321 


325,900 


.0904 


325, 900 


.0277 


325, 900 


.0048 


179, 750 


.1386 


179, 750 


.1221 


179, 750 


.0233 


505,650 


.0057 


505, 650 


.0012 


505,650 


.0005 


288,900 


.0216 


505,650 


.0084 


505, 650 


.0370 


505,650 


.3537 


205,500 


.0143 


205,500 


.0196 


205,500 


.0036 


205,500 


.0087 



.0462 



Material excavated, all earth. 

Table No. 25. — Dredging — Gamboa gravel production — Detail cost per unit of work, 
fiscal year 1920 {December, 1919, to June, 1920, inclusive). 





Decem- 
ber. 


January. 


Feb- 
ruary. 


March. 


.\pril. 


May. 


June. 


Total. 


Quantities, cubic 
yards 


1,068 


1.5,902 


14,825 


20,809 


21.842 


21,997 


23,175 


119,618 


Unloading from 
barges 


$2. 1306 
. 0373 


$0. 0,550 
.1325 
. 2572 
. 0821 
.6168 
.2000 
.0.506 


?0. 0708 
.1172 
. 1825 
. 0866 
. 7659 
.2000 
. 0432 


?0. 0575 
.1039 
.1088 
.0.5,53 
.7147 
.2fK)0 
. 0350 


$0. 0594 
. 1005 
.1917 
. 1079 
.6014 
.2000 
.0373 


$0. 0562 
.0975 
, 1056 
.0493 
. 5284 
.2000 
. 0269 


$0. 0518 
.0987 
.0884 
2. 1,587 
. .5,306 
.2000 
. 0359 


$0.0763 


Switching. . 


. 1060 


Storing 


. 0,569 


Repaiistoequipment. 
Dredging and towing. 
Plint arbitrarv 


. 04.59 
2.0549 


.2888 
.6371 
.1982 


Division expense 


.3121 


.0397 


Total, division 


5.1808 


1.3942 


1.4662 


1.27.52 


1.2982 


1.0639 


3. 1641 


1.4030 







REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



199 



"Table No. 26. — Detail of cost of production and distribution of electric current for fiscal 

year 1920. 





July. 


August. 


September. 


October. 


November. 


December. 


-Power plants: 

Gatiin hydroelectric 


$4,027.16 
9,367.94 
8, 000. 00 


$2, 544. 95 
8,713.43 
25,000.00 


$3,981.91 
8,511.17 
6, 390. 00 


$4,023.10 
8,679.55 
6,390.00 


$4,258.81 
8,665.69 
6,390.00 


$3,930.62 
8, .507. 52 


Reserve for depreciation... 


6,390.00 


Total production cost . . . 


21, 995. 10 


36, 258. 38 


18,883.08 


19,092.65 


19,314.50 


18,828.14 


Substations: 
Cristobal 


1,500.39 
2, 168. 89 
1,912.84 
1,813.24 


1,488.88 
955.35 

1, 4,S8. 58 
863. 81 


1,614.25 
1,805.26 
1,867.82 
1,512.95 
4,385.00 

551.60 


1,477.86 
1,555.72 
2, 032. 83 
1,833.23 
4,385.00 

315.36 


1,672.92 
1, 553. 12 
2,081.87 
1,700.06 
4,385.00 

59.82 

30.14 

398. 77 


1,478.61 


Gatun . . 


1,813.15 


Miraflores 


2, 012. 45 


Balboa . 


1,497.00 


Reserve for depreciation... 


4,385.00 


Transmission lines: 

Cristobal to Gatun 

Miraflores to Balboa 


101.31 

265. 00 

1,494.21 


210. 19 

25.82 

1,698.19 


163.34 


Gatun to Miraflores 


1, 349. 52 


699.65 


363.02 








2, 250. 00 
5, 755. 40 


2, 250. 00 
5, 276. 48 

500.00 


2, 250. 00 
5, 707. 97 

500.00 


2, 250. 00 




2, 657. 68 


4, 092. 70 



5, 680. 39 


Reserve for repairs — power 
system 


500. 00 










Cost of current distrib- 
uted 


33, 908. 66 


47,051.90 


39,974.88 


39,418.78 


39,654.17 


38,971.10 




Kilowatt hours distributed 

Cost per kilowatt hour: 


4,417,078 

$0. 0050 
.0077 


4, 584, 693 

$0.0079 
.0103 


4,345,679 

$0.0043 
.0092 


4, 549, 394 

$0. 0042 
.0087 


4, 365, 968 

$0. 0044 
.0091 


4, 829, 153 
$0. 0039 


Current distributed 


.0081 





January. 


Feb- 
ruary. 


March. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


Total. 


Power plants: 

Gatun hydroelectric 

Miraflores steam 


$4,107.22 
6, 474. 27 
6,390.00 


$4, 166. 26 
4,993.68 
6,390.00 


$4, 330. Sfi 
2.5,367.22 
6,390.00 


S4, 305. 62 
24, 965. 85 
6, 390. 00 


$4,711.14 
20, 423. 12 
6, 390. 00 


$3,784.06 
7,431.17 
6,390.00 


$48,771.71 
142,100.61 


Reserve for depreciation 


96, 900. 00 


Total production cost 


16,971.49 


15,549.94 


36, 088. 08 


35,661.47 


31,524.26 


17, 605. 23 


287, 772. 32 


Substations: 


1, 482. 48 
2, 054. 93 
1,942.68 
1,415.09 
4, 385. 00 

131.60 

72.23 

642.95 


1,664.84 
2, 259. 44 
1,883.12 
1,426.57 
4, 385. 00 

122. 10 
62. 60 
499. 63 


1,316.32 
1,798.12 
1,947.07 
1,716.97 
4,385.00 

288.97 

72.27 

740. 19 


1, 340. 84 
1, 767. 20 
1,910.30 
1,841.32 
4,385.00 

917.71 

25.00 

2,690.42 


1,547.01 
1,828.56 
1,884.19 
1, 579. 72 
4,385.00 

164. 12 

362. 02 

1,089.11 


1,656.71 
1,950.28 
2,389.67 
1,871.62 
4, 385. 00 

256.13 

90.26 

807, 36 

36.64 

2, 250. 00 

5,691.25 

500.00 


18,241.11 


Gatun 


21,510.02 


Miraflores 


23,323.42 


Balboa 


19,071.58 


Reserve for depreciation 

Transmission lines: 
Cristobal to Gatun 


43, 850. 00 
3, 282. 25 


Miraflores to Balboa 


1,005.34 
12, 473. 02 




36.64 


Reserve for depreciation 

Distribution lines 


2, 250. 00 
6,364.75 

500.00 


2, 250. 00 
5,098.63 

500.00 


2, 250. 00 
6, 335. 21 

500.00 


2, 250. 00 
5, 148. 47 

500.00 


2,250.00 
5, 102. 66 

500.00 


22, 500. 00 
62,911.59 


Reserve for repairs — power sys- 
tem 


4, 500. 00 






Cost of current distributed 


38, 213. 20 


35,701.87 


57, 438. 20 


.58, 437. 73 


52, 216. 65 


39, 490. 15 


520, 477. 29 


Kilowatt hours distributed 

Cost per kilowatt hour: 


5,006,940 

$0.0034 
.0076 


4, 502, 610 
$0. 0035 


4,752,618 
$0. 0076 


4,507,733 

$0. 0079 
.0130 


4, 685, 090 

$0. 0067 
.0111 


4, 753, 138 

$0. 0037 
.0083 


55,300,094 
$0. 0052 


Current distributed . 


. 0079 - ni 21 


.0094 











200 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 27. — Cost of ivater per 1,000 gallons, fiscal year 1920, Ancon-Balboa-Panama 

system. 
[Quantities exclude water used in city of Panama and North of Pedro Miguel.] 





Quantity, 

1,000" 
gallons. 


Mainte- 
nance 

Oamboa 
pump 

station. 


Opera- 
tion Mira- 

flores 
filtration 

plant. 


Opera- 
tion 
Balboa 

pump 
station. 


Mainte- 
nance 
water 
mains. 


Total. 


1919. 
July 


146, 779 
154,651 
137,207 
130, 829 
131, 725 
133,253 

168,591 
157,275 
173,234 
147,402 
147,793 
134, 681 


$0.0162 
.0151 
.0174 
.0160 
.0047 
.0287 

.0148 
.01.55 
.0141 
.0209 
.0227 
.0205 


$0.0179 
.0186 
.0221 
.0225 
.0151 
.0276 

.0190 
.0193 
.0191 
.0210 
.0223 
.0254 


$0. 0108 
.0107 
.0160 
.0135 
.0057 
.0256 

.0121 
.0121 
.0118 
.0169 
.0176 
.0166 


$0.0010 
.0077 
. 0383 
.0307 
.0359 
.0385 

.0176 
.0162 
.0212 
.0291 
.0274 
. 0281 


$0 0459 


August 


.0521 


September 


.0938 


October 


.0827 


November 


.0614 


December 


.1204 


1920. 
January 


.0635 


February 


.0631 


March. .1 


.0662 


April 

Mav 


.0879 
.0900 


June 


.0906 






Total 


1,763,420 


.0172 


.0208 


.0140 


. 0225 


. 0745 







Table No. 28. — Cost of water per 1,000 gallons, fiscal year 1920, Colon- Cristobal system. 
[Quantities exclude water used in city of Colon.) 





Quantity, 

1,000 " 
gallons. 


Mainte- 
nance 

Brazos 

brook 

reservoir. 


Opera- 
tion 
Mount 
Hope 
filtration 
plant. 


Opera- 
tion 

Mount 
Hope 

pump 

station. 


Mainte- 
nance 
water 
mains. 


Total. 


1919. 
July 


94,854 
129,089 
133,037 
137, 599 
142,950 
152,807 

162, 751 
139.973 
114,062 
1.39,781 
99, 725 
85,684 


$0.0120 
.0112 
.0105 
.0130 
.0100 
.0061 

. 0060 

. oo(;o 

.0095 
.0064 
.0071 
.0075 


$0.0104 
.0103 
.0103 
.0104 
.0072 
.0129 

.0103 
.0100 
.0120 
.0120 
.0131 
. 0156 


$0.0173 
.0166 
.0168 
.01.53 
.0165 
.0333 

.0147 
.0145 
.0189 
.0241 
. 0206 
.0192 


$0.0317 
.0315 
.0329 
.0426 

1 .0079 
.0248 

.0221 
.0114 
.0163 
.0121 
.0222 
1 . 0576 


$0.0714 


August 


.0696 


September 


.0705 


October 


.0813 


November 


.0258 


December 


.0771 


1920. 
January 


. 0531 


February 


.0419 


March 


.0567 


April 


. 0546 


May 


.0630 


June 


1 .0153 






Total 


1,532,312 


.0087 


.0162 


.0190 


.0170 


.0609 







Table No. 29. 



1 Credit. 
■Cost of water per 1,000 gallons, fiscal year 1920, Gatun system. 





Quantity, 

1,000" 

gallons. 


Mainte- 
nance 
Agua 
Clara 

reservoir. 


Opera- 
tion 
Agua 
Clara 
filtration 
plant. 


Opera- 
tion 

Agua 
Clara 
pump 

station. 


Mainte- 
nance 
water 
mains. 


Total. 


1919. 

July , 

August 


31,297 
31,372 
30, 207 
31,895 
30,991 
33, 092 

38, 1.52 
3S, 299 
40.532 
41, 029 
42,292 
37, 956 


$0.0390 
.0422 
.0413 
.0529 
.0523 
.0378 

.0318 
.02.50 
.0221 
.0193 
.2360 
.02:54 


$0.0346 
.04.30 
.0355 
.0513 
.0260 
.0532 

.0386 
.0382 
.0.598 
. 0748 
. 0660 
. 0666 


$0.0431 
.0447 
.0491 
.0402 
.0321 
.0784 

.0419 
.0382 
. 0357 
.0443 
.0528 
.0279 


$0. 0207 
.0262 
.0075 
.0256 
.0225 
.0214 

.0100 
.0135 
.0096 
.0127 
.0080 
1 . 0413 


$0. 1374 
.1561 


September 

October 

November 


.1334 
.1700 
.1329 


December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

A pril 


.1908 

■ 

.1223 
.1149 
.1272 
.1511 


May 

June 


.1504 
.0766 






Total 


427,714 


.0330 


.0503 


.0440 


.0105 


.1378 







» Credit. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 201 

Table No. 30. — Cost of operating all quarters for emfloyees, fiscal year 1920. 



July, 1919. 



August, 
1919. 



September, 
1919. 



October, 
1919. 



Repairs to buildings 

Fuel— coal and kindling 

Grass cutting 

Disposal of garbage 

Repairs to furniture 

Repairs to stoves 

Corral serxice 

Janitor service 

Utility service 

Care of grounds 

Mattress factory 

Electric lighting 

Division expense 

Total, division cost 

Equipment and tools 

Furniture, mattresses, and stoves .* . 

Install liot water tanks in gold bachelor quarters 

Total, division cost 



824,369.19 
8,167.36 
3, 568. 60 
2,348.96 
3,349,55 
1,900.94 
4, 468. 55 
7,835.78 
3,181.92 
6,973.47 
466. 85 
7,541.36 
4,537.96 



$26,687.65 
8, 864. 26 
3,741.85 
1,977.89 
3,322.69 
1,594.24 
3, 904. 87 
7,569.41 
3, 095. 40 
7,067.03 
3,404.44 
7,671.42 
4,717.09 



$28,516.17 
7,631 90 
3, 564. 39 
1,780.06 
4,483.02 
1,817.72 
5,031.05 
8,049.70 
3,530 52 
6, 257. 43 
1,119.17 
7,569 39 
4,200.76 



$38,3.58.14 
8, 120. 13 

3, 825. 54 
1,688.72 
4, 162. 27 
1,503.37 
5, 199. 52 
7,771.76 
3,679.44 
7,392.85 
1, 552. 93 
7, 750 20 

4, 215 15 



78, 710. 49 

717.82 

2,790.88 

2,218.22 



83, 618. 24 

146.25 

1,543.96 

220.39 



83,551.28 

1,937.91 

4,423.63 

268. 79 



95, 220. 02 

414. 09 

1990.72 

12.20 



84, 437. 41 



85,528.84 



90,181.61 



94,655.59 



Repairs to buildings 

Fuel— coal and kindling 

Grass cutting 

Disposal of garbage 

Repairs to furniture 

Repairs to stoves 

Corral service 

Janitor service 

Utility service 

Care of grounds 

Mattress factory 

Electric 1 ighting 

Division expense 

Total, division cost 

Equipment and tools 

Furniture, mattresses, and stoves 

Install hot water tanks in gold bachelor quarters 

Total, division cost 



November, 
1919. 



$28,021.91 
6,974.08 
3, 218. 47 
2, 1.53. 86 
2, 822. 05 
2,243.11 
3,877.20 

7, 510. 32 
2,933.28 
6,240.23 
2,074.45 

8, 551. 77 
4,124.92 



December, 
1919. 



$36, 753. 02 
6,712.15 
3,510.16 
2,092.61 
3, 970. 75 
2. 352. 85 
5', 2S0. 61 
7, 746. 18 
3,067.84 

7, 762. 51 
1, 258. 56 

8. 241. 81 
3,968.07 



BO, 745. 65 

1,373.14 

143.07 

55.59 



92,717.12 

1 2, 293. 18 

328. 88 

15.50 



82, 317. 45 



90,768.32 



January, 
1923. ■ 



$38,201.54 
7,745.80 
4,129.92 
1,633.22 
6,349.71 
1,8.57.67 
4.643.60 
7; 982. 31 
3, 247. 61 
7, 196. 85 
1, 135. 30 
7, 5.39. 20 
3,662.51 



95,325.24 
'2.251.38 
12,600.53 



105,674.39 



February, 
1920. 



$26,320.12 
8,444.37 
1,615.64 
1,951.03 
4,982.75 
1,493.25 
3, 372. 96 
7,733.36 
2, 162. 79 
6.876.11 
878. 06 
5,931.10 
4, 555. 88 



76,317.42 

7,386.25 

794. 89 



84, 498. 56 



Repairs to buildings 

Fuel— coal and kindling . 

Grass cutting 

Disposal of garbage 

Repairs to fumitiu-e 

Repairs to stoves 

Corral service 

Janitor service 

Utility service 

Care of grounds 

Mattress factory 

Electric lighting 

Division expense 



Total, division cost 

Equipment and tools 

Furniture , mai tresses, and stov es 

Install hot water tanks in gold bachelor 
quarters 



March, 1920, 



931.74 
795. 70 
753. 27 
030. 78 
903.41 
715.72 
487. 88 
327. 84 
842.85 
293. 33 
119.40 
822. 70 
761.98 



76, 786. 60 
1,456.19 
1,341.16 



Total, division cost 1 79, 583. 95 

I 



April, 1920. 



$41,206.65 
10,059.07 
1, 173. 26 
1,947.35 
5, 369. 55 
2, 059. 39 
3,935.84 
9, 824. 26 
4, 553. 03 
8,051.31 
3, 005. 19 
2.29 
3,170.67 



May, 1920. 



536,593.91 
11.200.75 

2, 838. 22 
3,036.70 
5,741.28 
2,394.27 
5, 633. 79 
8, 604. 71 

3, 431. 72 
8, 210. 69 

'771.88 
8,051.46 
3,365.61 



94, 357. 86 
2, 481. 47 
4,4t)0.90 

2, 540. 15 



103,780.38 



98,331.23 

370. 41 

11,128.38 

1,370.85 



111,200.87 



$30,234.05 
9, 225. 88 
4, 145. 25 
1,895.74 
6,247.62 
2 087.97 
6', 188. 79 
9, 441. 34 
3,150.69 
8,925.00 
1,329.78 
15, 365. 38 
4,405.15 



102,642.64 

660. 21 

3, 086. 29 

330. 68 



106, 719. 82 



Total, 1920. 



$374,194.09 
103,941.45 
37, 084. 57 
24, 536. 92 
54,704.65 
23 020.50 
55, 024. 66 
99, 396. 97 
39,877.09 
89, 246. 81 
15, 572. 25 
93,0.38.08 
48,685.75 



1,058,323.79 
12, 399. 18 
41,591.85 

7,032.37 



1,119,347.19 



1 Credit. 



202 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 31.— Statement of appropriation, receipts, and disbi(rsements for fscal year 

ended June 30, 1920. 





Receipts. 






Cash bal- 
ance July 1, 
1919. 


Appropria- 
tions. 


Collections. 


Transfers 

between 

departments. 


Total 
available. 


Canal connecting Atlantic and 
Pacific Oceans 


$403,964.22 

177,094.63 

2,517,644.81 

5, 077, 902. 79 

248,328.85 

51,335.40 

782. 20 

493. 40 




$20,000.00 

56. .35 

83.34 

16,670,873.15 

726,684.99 

56, 805. 18 




$423,964.22 
177 150 98 


Panama Canal fund 






Construction and equipment 


8729,898.00 

7, 547, 939. 00 

8.50, 000. 00 

852,000.00 




3,247,626.15 


Maintenance and operation 

Sanitation 


$4, 507, 888. 46 


.33,804,603.40 

1,825,013.84 

1,005,233.46 

782. 20 


Civil government 


45,092.88 


Increase of compensation, 1918. . . 


Increase of compensation, 1919... 


18. 33 






511 73 


Increase of compensation, 1920.. 


35,000.00 


.67 




35,000.67 








Total 


8,477,546.30 


10,014,855.33 


17,474,503.68 


4,552,981.34 


40,519,886.65 




Presenting launch Louise to 
French Government 


159.01 

1,500.00 

2.50,000.00 
77,326.85 
38, ,380. 18 








159 01 


Private act, Feb. IS, 1913, Oscar 
F. Lackev 








1 500 00 


Annual payment to Republic of 
Panama 


250,000.00 






500,000.00 
77,326.85 
38,380.18 


Censorship of foreign mails, 1919. . 






Regulating commerce, etc. , 1919 . . 
















Total 


367,366.04 


250,000.00 






617,366.04 













Expenditures. 






Disburse- 
ments. 


1 

1 Transfers 
between 
departments. 


Total. 


Cash balance 
June 30, 1920. 


Canal connecting Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. . 
Panama Canal fund 


$404. 10 

844,48 

522,898.38 

24,233,657.11 

1,299,439.73 

794,633.92 

782. 20 

41.66 

32,435.10 


$25,386.79 
44,314.42 
920, 740. 85 


$25,790.89 

45,158.90 

1,443,639.23 

24,233,657.11 

1,534,916.85 

852,786.31 

782.20 

41.66 

32,435.10 


$398,173.33 
131,992.08 


Coii-itruction and equipment 


1,803,986.92 


Maintenance and operation 


9, 570, 946. 29 


Sanitation 


235,477.12 
58,152.39 


290, 096. 99 


Civil government 


152,447.15 


Increase of compensation, 1918 


Increase of compensation, 1919 . 




470. 07 


Increase of compensation, 1920 




2, 565. 57 








Total 


26,885,136.68 


1,284,071.57 


28,169,208.25 


12,350,678.49 






Presenting launch Louise to French Govern- 
ment 








159.01 


Privateaet) Feb. 18, 1913, O.sqar F. Lackey 








1,500.00 


Annual payment to Republic of Panama . . . 


250, 000. 00 




250,000.00 
24,121.64 
16,813.38 


250,000.00 


Censorship of foreign mails, 1919 




24,121.64 


53,205.21 


Regulating commerce, etc., 1919 




16,813.38 


21,566.80 








Total 


250,000.00 


40,935.02 


290,935.02 


326,431.02 







REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



203 



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THE PANAMA CANAL. 



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205 



Table No. 33. — Statement of collections repaid to appropriations and to individuals and 
companies and collections deposited to miscellaneous receipts during the fiscal year 
ended June JO, 1920. 



Department and classification. 



DEPARTMENT OF OPERATION AND 
MAINTENANCE. 

Gross ivccipts from sales of other 
than Canal construction material. . 

Electrical 

Municipal engineering 

Marine 

Dams and backfill 

Balboa shops 

Quartermaster 

Building 

Washington office 

Undistributed expenditures 

Reserve for losses on obsolete stock. . 

Clubs and playgrounds 

Construction and repairs 

Shop work 

Electric work 

Electric current 

Tram service and use of rolling 
equipment 

Tug service 

Service of other floating equipment. . 

Pilotage 

Wharfage 

Sales of water 

Operation and maintenance of Pan- 
ama water works 

Handling lines at locks 

Handling lines at docks 

Steamship inspection 

Dredging 

Minor services, supplies, and prop- 
erty 

Dry dock, Balboa 

Dry dock, Cristobal 

United States invoices 

Coupon books 

Reserves 



Total, department of opera- 
tion and maintenance 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Subsistence : 

Commissary coupons honored by 

Panama ("anal 

Subsistence 

Meals furnished 

Hotel TivoU 

Hotel Aspinwall 

Line hotels 

Messes 

Minor services, suppUes, and 

property 

Laborers' meal tickets 



Total, fiscal 
vear 1920. 



Total, subsistence. 



Quartermaster: 

Audited bills 

Claims versus carriers 

Quartermaster 

Material from stock 

Rock, sand, and gravel, etc. 

Printing and buiding 

Corral 

Rental of gold quarters 

Rental of silver quarters 

Garage rentals 

Ancon nursery 

Handling fuel oil 

Operation of stores 

Operat ion of quarters 



S366, 152. 19 

556. 25 

8.32 

7.26 

6.00 

2, 028. 04 

568. 66 

8.10 

.97 

2, 815. 11 

92, 578. 19 

9.56 

1,362,456.91 

4,391,518.09 

382, 799. 45 

127,640.28 

540. 49 
309, 793. 90 
78, 274. 12 
73,203.00 
29, 100. 77 
111,503.86 

226, 719. 65 

64,220.50 

1,108.00 

2,824.50 

98,647.45 

21,094.39 
121,681.71 
28,598.92 
21,505.61 
50.00 
1,876.% 



7.919,897.21 



704,554.53 

2.25 

26, 760. 10 

191,206:55 
30,98:5.98 
89,533.74 
16,428.11 

1,496.90 
50,556.42 



1,111,522.58 



14.25 

1,951.29 

1,263.30 

1,226,707.08 

21,480.40 

50,124.59 

138, 852. 89 

832.81 

113,900.51 

8, 607. 84 

5, 683. 52 

137,421.41 

54,027.97 

139,900.00 



Department and classification. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT — Continued. 

Quartermaster — Continued. 

Minor services, supplies, and 

property 

Fuel oil . ." 

Las Cascadas silver settlement. . . 

Total, quartermaster 

Total, supply department 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT. 

Overpayments 

Lost property 

Auditor 

Collector 

Lost metal checks 

Cablegrams 

Proportion of salaries 

Rental of safety deposit box 

Mmor services, supplies, and prop- 
erty 

Total, accounting department 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

E xecuti ve , miscellaneous 

Proportion of salaries 

Photographs and prints 

Motor car services 

Minor services, supplies, and prop- 
erty 

Canal Record 

Lost photo identification checks — 
Annual report 

Total, executive department. 

CIVIL GOVERNMENT. 



PoUce and prisons 

School tuition 

Sale of school books 

Police services 

Minor services, supplies, and prop- 
erty 

Postal services 

Services of customs officers , 



Total, fiscal 
year 1920. 



Sill, 179. 45 

1,139,901.75 

378. 49 



3,152,209.05 



4,263,731.63 



Total, civil government. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Land rental 

Building rental 

Land office expense 

Joint Commission transcripts. 

Equipment rental 

Rental of pier 

Boathousc rentals 



Total, miscellaneous. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



Health 

Santo Tomas Hospital. 
Ancon Hospital: 

Fees 

Mess 

Burials 

Miscellaneous 



209. 26 
658. 65 
134. 00 
115. 75 
3&3. 62 
2,009.65 
206,012.32 
529. 60 

5, 189. 93 



215, 302. 78 



6.50 

80, 720. 56 

1,34.3.07 

8,960.00 

161. 03 

54.49 

346. 44 

.50 



91,592.59 



84.00 

5, 459. 00 

650. 03 

30,020.38 

8, 922. OS 

1,325.00 

762. 00 



17,987.50 

3,293.25 

8,250.00 

7.20 

46. 68 

8, 348. 34 

359. 94 



38,292.91 



107. 81 
707. 47 

199, 895. 55 
17,048.98 
5,819.77 
2,362.12 



1 Credit. 



206 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 33. — Statement of collections repaid to appropriations and to individuals and 
companies and collections deposited to miscellaneous receipts during the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1920 — Continued. 



Department and classification. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT— continued. 

Colon Hospital: 

P'ees 

Mess 

Miscellaneous 

Palo Seco Leper Asylum 

Dispensaries 

Quarantine: 

Subsistence 

Other charges 

Sanitation: 

Panama 

Colon 

Zone 

Street cleaning: 

Panama 

Colon 

Corozal Hospital: 

Produce 

Pasturage 

Burials 

Insane asylum 

Sales from medical store 

District dentist, Ancon Hospital 



Total, health department 

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 

Gross receipts from sale of Canal 
construction material 

Miscellaneous credits due Canal 
construction accounts 

Water rentals, Panama and Colon.. . 

Reserve for losses on obsolete stock . . 

Interest on bank balances 

Averages 

Miscellaneous 

ToUs 

Licenses and taxes 

Court fees and fines 

Postal receipts 

Miscellaneous, Canal Zone 



Total, fiscal 
year 1920. 



Total, miscellaneous receipts . 



$24,248.91 

4, 1.55. 22 

512. 05 

23,147.04 

13,659.02 

39, 592. 19 
8,006.97 

11,142.97 
14,734.98 
16,388.93 

57,416.95 
37,964.46 

12,6.50.90 

127. 10 

647.50 

127,061.02 

65,764.63 
320.00 



683,482.54 



12,034,19 

6,520.00 

63,684.84 

17,781.62 

50,000.00 

3.06 

6,380.11 

,456,472.07 

15,354.05 

27,694.45 

109,117.48 

826.90 



8,765,868.77 



Department and classification. 



COLLECTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS 
AND COMPANIES. 

Paymaster, various individuals and 
companies 

Paymaster, Panama Railroad com- 
missary books 



Total, collections for indi- 
viduals and companies 



Total, fiscal 
year 1920. 



$706. 8? 
29.34 



736. 16. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Department of operation and main- 
tenance 

Supply department: 

Subsistence $1, 111, 522. 58 

Quartermaster... 3,152,209.05 



Accounting department. 
Executive department. . 



Total , maintenance and opera- 
tion 

Total, civil government 

Total, sanitation 

Total, miscellaneous 



Total, repay to appropria- 
tions 

Miscellaneous receipts 

Individuals and companies 



7,919,897.21 



4,263,731.63 
215,302.78 
91, 592. 59 



12,490,524.21 

47,222.49- 

683, 482. 54 

38,292.91 



Grand total for year. 



13,259,522.15^ 

8,765,868.77 

736. 16 



22, 026, 127. 08 



Special deposits on Isthmus 

Special deposits in United States. 



Total, special deposits. 



18,631,811.32 
2,287,783.21 



20,919,594.53 



Table No. 34. — Statement of transactions in the collector's special deposit account 
during the fiscal year ended June JO, 1920. 



IN THE UNITED STATES. 



Month. 



1919. 

July 

Auu'ust 

Septemljer 

October 

Novenil)er 

December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



Deposits. 



Panama Canal 
bills applied. 



$263, 137. 35 
230, 358. 40 
235, 70"). 43 
227,643.77 
241,3:iS.75 
223,:550.00 



244,453.75 
124,002.70 
128,864.75 
190,779.31 
63,249.00 
108,900.00 



$140,325.77 
12), 196. 11 
125,219.85 
139,316.03 
91,488.76 
110, .56.5. 85 



118,397.95 
146,6:«. 08 
91,400.51 
54,293.63 
29, 932. 22 
71,112.04 



2,287,7.83.21 1,243,883.80 



Payments to 

individuals and 

companies. 



$10'),072.55 
80,112.47 
81,666.02 
79, 234. 84 
66, .507. 67 
66,252.29 



79,996.11 
.53,395.43 
34, 938. 46 
32, 057. 77 
62,613.45 
40,121.84 



788,058.90 



Refunds. 



$15, 130. 77 
12,310.90 
19,339.87 
40,282.90 
33,405.78 
74,271.13 



43,382.72 
28,333.58 
51,851.29 
24,210.40 
773.83 
16,510.79 



359,803.96 



' Includes the Panama Railroad Company, All American Cables (Inc.), and other individuals and com- 
panies. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



207 



Table No. 34. — Statement of transactions in the collector's special deposit account 
during the fiscfll year ended June 30, 1920 — Continued. 



ON THE ISTHMUS. 



Month. 



Deposits. 



Panama Canal 
bills applied. 



Payments to 

individuals and 

companies. 



Refunds. 



July 

AufTUst 

September. 

October 

November. 
December.. 



1919. 



January... 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 



$1,039,303.71 
1,202,078.42 
1,103,530.14 
1,377,621.95 
1,142,224.68 
1,788,067.09 



1,850,566.29 
1,405,275.51 
2,041,244.19 

1,957,484.87 
2, 059, 526. .38 
1,664,888.09 



$531,179.20 
622,785.10 
625,002.03 
690,678.12 
737,041.09 
979,639.36 



1,066,110.04 
858,211.27 
1,214,185.48 
1,309,282.83 
1,399,056.77 
1,070,406.42 



$458,385.27 
564,842.40 
.504,673.44 
594, 509. 20 
501,564.24 
843,668.48 



611,935.43 
623,7.36.49 
716,975.17 
.584,204.76 
615,899.73 
616,642.55 



Total ' 18,631,811.32 



11,103,577.71 



7,237,037.16 



82,528.97 
627. 99 
3,835.25 
5,233.33 
1.52. 10 
5,805.10 



6,566.06 
4,023.56 
2, 095. 27 

29,490.63 
1,887.82 

33, 201.. S3 



95, 447. 91 



RECAPITULATION. 



In the United States. 



On the Isthmus. 



On hand July 1, 1919 

Deposits during year 

Panama Canal bills applied 

Payments to individuals and companies 

Refunds 

On hand June 30, 1920 



$190,490.34 
2,287,783.21 



Total. 



2,478,273.55 



$1,243,883.80 

788, 058. 90 

359,803.96 

86, 526. 89 



$244,903.86 
18,631,811.32 



2,478,273.55 



18,876,715.18 



,103,577.71 

, 237, 037. 16 

95,447.91 

440, 652. 40 



18,876,715.18 



Table No. 3 



5. — Statetncnt of audited pay rolls on Isthmus during fiscnl year 1920. 



Operation and maintenance: 
Executive office — 

Executive 

Record 

Personnel 

Correspondence 

Property 

Statistics 

General 

Timekeeping 

Shipping commissioner 

Motor cars 

Clubs and playgrounds 

Total, executive office 

Engineer of maintenance — 
Lock operation — 

Atlantic 

Pacific 

Electrical 

Dredging 

Municipal engineering 

Balboa incinerator 

Office engineer 

Meteorology and hydrography 

Surveys 

Maintenance, Gatun dam 

Total, engineer of maintenance 



Total. 



$20,875.60 
64,180.89 
28,458.21 
38,233.56 
29,532.90 
14,411.87 
30,769.96 
93,102.09 
27,771.11 
12,297.02 

138,335.04 



497,968.25 



286,141.32 

500,017.21 

783,454.81 

980,145.00 

1,249.780.95 

15,696.55 

49,617.51 

28,180.93 

39,277.53 

39,233.88 



3,971,545.69 



Salaries. 



$20,875.60 
63,395.66 
28,458.21 
38,233.56 
29,532.90 
14,411.87 
30,142.45 
93,102.09 
27,771.11 
3,840.00 

123,901.75 



473,665.20 



75,755.05 
119,387.40 
188,237.63 
2.32,250.75 
3.55,807.90 



48,486.49 

22, 802. .53 

24,0.38.52 

9,240.06 



1,076,006.33 



Wages. 



$785.23 



627.51 



8,457.02 
14,433.29 



24,303.05 



210,386.27 

380,629.81 

595,217.18 

747,894.25 

893,973.05 

15,690.55 

1,131.02 

5,378.40 

15,239.01 

29,993.82 



2,895,539.36 



208 



THE PAN^AMA CANAL. 



Table No. 35. — Statement of audited pay rolls on Isthmus during fiscal year 

i9^0— Continued. 



Operation and maintenance— Continued. 
Marine division — 

(^tlice 

Port captain— 

J^alboa 

Cristobal 

Lighthouse division 



Total, marine division. 



Mechanical division — 

Balboa 

Cristobal 



Total, mechanical division. 



Supply department- 
Quartermaster — 

OiP.ce 

Storehouses 

District quartermaster. 

Printin!,' plant 

Fuel-oil plants 



Total, quartermaster. 
Subsistence 



Total, quartermaster and subsistence. 



Accounting — 

Auditor 

Paymaster. 
Collector 



Total, accounting. 

Building 

Fortifications 

Injury and death — 

Old act 

New act 



Total, operation and maintenance. 



Construction and equipment: 

Joint commission 

Special attorney and land office. 



Total, construction and equipment . 



Civil government: 

Civil affairs 

Posts 

Police and prisons . . 

Fire protection 

Schools 

District court 

District attorney . . . 

Marshal 

Magistrate courts . . . 
Censorship of mails . 



Total, civil government. 



Sanitation: 

Office 

Medical store - 

Ancon Hcspital 

Colon Hospital , 

Santo Tonias Hospital 

Palo Seco Leper Asylum. 
Dispensaries 



Quarantine — 

Odice 

Balbr)a , 

Cristobal 

BocasdelToro. 



Coroza] farm 

Cnrozal Asylum. 



Total. 



$7,922.17 

353.522.91 

333,lSi5.12 

51,152.fi-l 



745,783.14 



3,002,003.76 
852,217.31 



3,854,221.07 



Salaries. 



17,697.47 

163,8.53.45 

17-1,234.51 

16,353.28 



362, 138. 71 



310,438.03 
60,249.32 



370,687.35 



39,. 525. 28 

343,019.16 

905,88;?. 30 

88,614.64 

50.064.19 



1,427,106.57 
220, 790. 19 



1,647,896.76 



382, 107. 25 
40,532.33 
36,921.71 



459,561.29 

2,000,287.08 

281,301.77 

1,073.95 
47,325.35 



13,506,964.35 



39,265.41 
18, 262. 16 



57,527.57 



39,525.28 
192,241.24 

235,884.77 

21,870.24 

9,885.59 



Wages. 



S225.00 

189,669.46 
158,9.50.61 
34,799.36 



383.644.43 



2,691.565.73 
79i;967.99 



3,483,533.72 



499,407.12 
85,188.36 



381,369.17 
40,532.33 
36,921.71 



458,823.21 
348,873.51 
105,207.20 



3,756.55 



150,777.92 

669,998.53 

66,744.40 

40, 178. 60 



927, 699. 45 
135,601.83 



1,063,301.28 



738.08 



738. 08 

1,651,413.57 

176,094.57 

1,073.95 
43,568.80 



3,783,753.54 



39,265.41 
18,262.16 



57,527.57 



38 

99 
2 

80 
131 

19 



736. 43 
,753.03 
740.51 
138. 24 
389. 13 
543.67 
631.33 
100.00 
125.32 
220.51 



677,378.17 



10,010.25 
11,214.60 
341,358.14 
53,006.62 
12.460.46 
16,221.70 
31,922.80 




38, 736. 43 

99,753.03 
277,740.51 

80, 138. 24 
131,. 389. 13 

19,543.67 
7,631.-33 
7,100.00 

13, 125. ,32 
2,220.51 



677,378.17 



10,010.25 
10,051.76 
282.127.11 
47,066.66 
12,460.46 
7,454.21 
31,267.80 



9,723,210.81 



1,102.84 
50,231.03 
5,939.96 



680.58 

14,2,30.73 

20,1.53.15 

1,915.99 



36,980.45 

4, 655.. 52 

39,. 392. 08 



8, 767. 49 
655.00 



4,482.53 
4,234.65 



8,717.18 
13,510.57 
8,699.69 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



209 



Table No. 35. — Statement of audited pay rolls on Isthmus during fiscal year 1920 — 

Continued. 





Total. 


Salaries. 


Wages. 


Sanitation— Continued . 
Health oltice— 


$106,481.51 
100,295.73 
144,487.36 


$36,. 582. 20 
40,733.44 
30.148.82 


869,899.31 


Colon 


.59,562.29 




114,338.54 






Total, sanitation 


939,414.66 
15,181,284.75 


.588,930.76 
5,107.590.04 


350,483.90 




10,073,694.71 







Table No. 36. — Statement of accounts receivable registered during the fiscal year ended 

June 30, 1920. 



Month. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 

Total for year ended 
June 30, 1919 



Number 
of bills 
regis- 
tered. 



2,020 
2,082 
2,034 
2,268 
2,173 
2,642 



2,742 
2,480 
2,639 
2,652 
2,543 
2,550 



28,825 
24,210 



Total. 



$2,024,949.45 
2,066,224.14 
1,987,329.54 
2,656,672.26 
2,132,095.25 
2,498,044.81 



2,626,202.53 
2,224,944.83 
2,671,329.49 
2,647,575.65 
2,569,154.60 
2,550,209.09 



28,654,731.64 
25,272,815.50 



Against the 
Panama 
Railroad. 



$282,097.37 
314,198.62 
373,026.33 
331,721.23 
296,082.07 
364,121.80 



386,100.41 
387,497.78 
320, 758. 79 
502,618.20 
378,083.76 
387,391.17 



Against 
Af.^r.Sl!?^:departme^^^ 



Republic 



of Panama. 



States 
Government. 



$15,724.18 
15,975.58 
16,602.10 
16,978.26 
15,827.93 
17,922.27 



20,410.50 
18,687.45 
17, 738. 96 
36,407.14 
19, 106. 18 
25,811.39 



$194,535.44 
229,714.39 
155,193.63 
225,588.62 
127,325.33 
156,078.49 



158,574.37 
168,310.43 
168,996.39 
216,957.04 
213,741.33 
319,924.91 



4,323,697.53 
4,305,595.36 



237,191.94 
204,682.21 



2,334,940.37 
3,352,891.52 



Against 
steamship 
companies. 



126,854.69 
315,0.58.02 
236,332.87 
421,971.74 
489,361.91 
465,870.17 



551,266.33 
373,379.74 
768, 052. 80 
578,117.71 
501,433.17 
541,032.54 



5,371,731.69 
3,239,957.55 



Month. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 

Total for j-ear ended 
June 30, 1919 



Against 

other 

individuals 

and 
companies. 



$414,246.50 
105, 157. 83 
125,710.28 
513,726.58 
140,058.89 
241,920.94 



315,932.90 
181,496.37 
203,319.19 
169,966.90 
245,030.69 
182, 539. 83 



2,839,106.90 
3,256,972.24 



Trust funds. 



For pay roll 
deductions. 



$446,452.69 
470,703.48 
485,042.11 
479, 750. 62 
492,156.74 
348,369.37 



424, 146. 53 
372,454.95 
357,047.53 
328,123.95 
369, 262. 12 
375,294.39 



4,948,804.48 
4,474,814.79 



Other col- 
lections. 



$609.00 

12.50 

50.00 

189. 13 



860.63 
6,925.16 



For various 

collections 

hospitals 

and 



$5,944.42 
5,956.76 
6,378.23 
5,438.34 



12,386.07 



16,905.00 
6,393.53 
7, 569. 46 
8,009.81 
6,946.68 



81,928.30 
64,699.24 



Tolls. 



$538,485.16 
609,446.96 
588,993.99 
661,307.74 
571,282.38 
891,375.70 



766,771.49 
706,213.11 
829,022.30 
807,815.25 
834,487.54 
711,268.18 



,516,469.80 
,181,637.43 



Repay to 
appropri- 
ations. 



$1,039,302.60 

985,661.20 

913,143.44 

1,506,-550.48 

1,065,254.88 

1,251,899.89 



1,424,971.89 
1,146,176.77 
1,357,500.99 
1,492,307.41 
1,354,989.94 
1,454,799.90 



14,992,559.39 
14,393,511.72 



8847—20- 



-14 



210 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 37. — Commissanj hooks issued, fiscal year 1920. 

COUPON BOOKS ISSUED ON PAY ROLL DEDUCTION. 



Month. 


$2.50 silver. 


$5 silver. 


$7.50 silver. 


Number. 


Value. 


Number. 


Value. 


Number. 


Value. 


1919. 
July 


21,553 
21,687 
20,687 
18,875 
20,884 
20,129 

10, 555 
7,131 
6,026 
5,750 
2,240 
2,302 


853,882.50 
54,217.50 
51,717.50 
47, 187.50 
52, 210. 00 
50,322.50 

26,387.50 
17,827.50 
15,065.00 
14,375.00 
5,600.00 
5,755.00 










August 










September 










October 










November 










December 










1920. 
January 










J'ebruary 










March 


12,378 
42,381 
45,903 
44,867 


$61,890.00 
211,905.00 
229,515.00 
224,335.00 






April 


9,137 
10,612 


$68,527.50 
7Q .i^Qn m 


May 


June 


12,918 96,885.00 






Total 


157,819 


394,547.50 


145, 529 


727,645.00 


32,667 245 002 ^n 









Month. 



$5 gold. 



1919 

July 

August , 

September 

October 

November , 

December , 

1920 

January , 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



Number. 



48, 661 
52, 314 
51,072 
52,906 
47, 282 
62, 073 



57, 264 

54,329 

34, 139 

1,521 

1,526 

1,674 



464, 761 



Value. 



$243,305.00 
261,570.00 
255,360.00 
264, 530. 00 
236,410.00 
310,365.00 



286,320.00 

271,645.00 

170,695.00 

7,605.00 

7,630.00 

8,370.00 



2,323,805.00 



$15 gold. 



Number. 



8,114 
8,569 
9,169 
9,709 
10,688 
12, 758 



11,208 
11,410 
11, 751 
12,073 
11,839 
11,819 



129, 107 



Value. 



$121,710.00 
128,535.00 
137,535.00 
145,635.00 
160,320.00 
191,370.00 



168,120.00 
171,150.00 
176, 265. 00 
181,095.00 
177,585.00 
177,285.00 



1,936,605.00 



Total 
value. 



$418,897.50 
444,322.50 
444,612.50 
457,352.50 
448,940.00 
552,057.50 



480,827.50 
460,622.50 
423,915.00 
483,507.50 
499,920.00 
512,630.00 



5,627,605.00 



COUPON BOOKS SOLD FOR CASH. 





Month. 


$2.50 silver. 


$5 silver. 


$7.50 silver. 




Number. 


Value. 


Number. 


Value. 


Number. 


Value. 


July 


1919. 


3,312 
3,244 
3,268 
2,837 
2,656 
2,859 

2,235 
2,306 
2,160 
3, 120 
3, 162 
3,496 


$8,280.00 
8,110.00 
8,170.00 
7,092.50 
6, 640. 00 
7,147.50 

5,587.50 
5,765.00 
5, 400. 00 
7,800.00 
7,905.00 
8,740.00 










August 










September.. 










October 










November 










December. 










January 


1920. 










February 












26 

706 

1,631 

1,819 


$130. 00 
3,530.00 
8, 155. 00 
9,095.00 






April 


204 
266 
248 


$1,530.00 


May 


1,995.00 


June 


1, 860. 00 








Total 


34,655 


86,637.50 


4,182 


20,910.00 


718 


5,385.00 









REPORT OF AUDITOR, 



211 



Table No. 37 — Commissary books issued, fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 
COUPON BOOKS SOLD FOR CASH— Continued. 



Month. 



1919. 



S5 gold. 



Number. Value. 



July 11, 935 

August : 12, 629 

September 1 11, 891 

October | 12, 070 

November ' 10, 755 

December 14, 413 



January. . 
February . 

March 

April 

May. 



1920. 



12,093 
12,01S 
13, 632 
13,083 
12,429 
June 12, 254 



Total 149,202 



$59, 675. 00 
63,145.00 
59, 455. 00 
60,350.00 
53,775.00 
72,06.5.00 



60, 465. 00 
60, 090. 00 
68, 160. 00 
65,415.00 
62,145.00 
61,270.00 



$15 gold. 



Number. 



Value. 



5,478 
5,962 
5,692 
5,916 
5,567 
7,881 

6,590 
7,020 
8, 1.50 
8,332 
8,265 
7,873 



746,010.00 



82, 726 



$82, 170. 00 
89,430.00 
85,380.00 
88, 740. 00 
83,505.00 

118,215.00 



98, 850. 00 
105, 300. 00 
122, 250. 00 
124,980.00 
123,975.00 
118,095.00 



Total 
value. 



1,240,890.00 



$150, 125. 00 
160,685.00 
153, 005. 00 
156, 182. 50 
143,920.00 
197,427.50 



164,902.50 
171,155.00 
195,940.00 
203, 255. 00 
204,175.00 
199,060.00 



2,099,832.50 



Surcharge 
to steam- 
ship com- 
panies.' 



$251.50 
298. 75 
257.50 
256. 25 
271.50 
372. 50 



297.50 
220.00 
316.25 
250. 00 
358. 75 
272. 50 



3, 423. 00 



1 25 per cent surcharge added on coupon books sold to steamship companies for use in purchasing sup- 
plies for vessels — in eflect Apr. 1, 1917. 

Table No. 38. — Commissary coupons honored at commissaries, hotels, messes, nursery, 
marine equipment, clubhouses, and Army and Navy Y. M. C. A. during the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1920. 



Month. 



1919 

July 

August 

September.. 
October . . . . 
November. . 
December . . 

1920, 

January 

February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total. 



Commissary. 



$507, 716. 76 
542, 723. 23 
526,266.71 
556,904.00 
520,869.58 
665, 215. 56 



598,362.04 
532,294.94 
562,455.79 
622, 750. 33 
632, 267. 69 
615,413.43 



6,883,240.06 



Hotels and 
messes. 



$48,924.80 
50,569.03 
51,279.58 
54,498.99 
52,412.49 
57, 737. 88 



58, 303. 50 
55,115.49 
60,022.74 
61,850.47 
61,319.63 
59, 837. 21 



671,871.81 



Ancon 
nursery. 



$116.35 
109. 56 
120. 95 
153. 52 
92.34 
154. 27 



161.81 
144. 16 
102. 93 
91.63 
96.93 
138. 04 



Marine 
equip- 
ment. 



1,482.49 



59.32 
63.51 
58.78 
50.00 
41.18 



66.84 
57.75 
47.71 
30.98 
39.90 
41.67 



626. 40 



Panama 
Canal club- 
houses. 



$6, 739. 54 
6,558.17 
6, 578. 04 
7, 700. 06 
7,991.80 
8,877.74 



9,016.65 
8,841.43 
8,488.43 
9, 723. 39 
10,821.43 
10, 131. 50 



101,468.18 



Army and 

Navy 
Y.M.C.A. 



$2,633.30 
2,891.21 
1,719.75 
2,846.04 
1,325.56 
2,243.30 



1,349.13 
1,336.64 
3,174.50 
1,282.40 
1,877.65 
2, 144. 72 



24,824.20 



Total 
value. 



$566, 199. 51 
602, 910. .52 
586,028.54 
622,161.39 
582,741.77 
734,269.93 



667, 2,59. 97 
597, 790. 41 
634, 292. 10 
695, 729. 20 
706, 423. 23 
687, 706. 57 



7,683,513.14 



Table No. 39. — Meal tickets issued to silver employees for which collections were made 

on pay rolls. 



Month. 



10 cents. 



Number. Value. 



30 cents. 



40 cents. 



Number. 



Value. I Number. 



Value. 



Total 
value. 



July-... 

August 

September. 
October . . . 
November. 
December . 



1919. 



201 
112 
36 
36 



January . . 
February. 

March 

April 

May 

June 



1920. 



$20. 10 
11.20 
3.60 
3.60 



588 
230 
264 
322 
1,337 
1,461 



994 
925 
259 
245 



$176. 40 

69.00 

79.20 

96.60 

534. 80 

584. 40 



397. 60 
370. 00 
103.60 
98.00 



17,761 
16,671 
13, 824 
13,290 
7,094 
7,296 



7,375 
5,003 
6,885 
4,673 



$7, 104. 40 
6,668.40 
5, 529. 60 
5,316.00 
3, .547. 00 
3,648.00 



3,687.50 
2,501.50 
3,442.50 
2,336.50 



$7, 300. 90 
6, 748. 60 
5,612.40 
5,416.20 
4,081.80 
4,232.40 



4,085.10 
2,871.50 
3,546.10 
2, 434. 50 



Total. 



385 



38.50 



6,625 2,509.60 99,872 \ 43,781.40 



46,329.50 



212 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 40. 



-Balances of miscellaneous trust funds on deposit with collector, June 
30, 1930. 



Postal swinETS funds .54,59. 00 

Money order funds '....'..'....'. 702"924. 40 

Trust funds 6^ 950. 90 

Clubhouse funds 53, 803. 17 

Interest 16, 620. 49 

Total 780, 757. 96 

Table No. 41. — Statement of money orders issued and paid hf the Canal Zone and 
Canal Zone orders paid by other administrations, fiscal years 1907 to 1920, inclusive. 



Year. 


Domestic money orders 
issued. 


Money orders paid by Canal Zone post offices. 


Number. 


Value. 


Marti- 
nique. 


Costa 
Rira. 


United 

States. 


Canal Zone. 


1907 


84,441 
1 r>3, 457 
180,389 
207, 220 
214, 780 
227, 680 
238,316 


$2,360,031.49 
4,686,684.98 
5, 166, 749. 46 
5, 228, .5.53. 60 
5,304,906.60 
4,915,077.26 
4 88:^ 694 1^ 






$18, 257. 90 

33,378.45 

52,680.22 

60, 470. 77 

66, 696. 58 

60,398.69 

89, 447. 95 

88, 533. 43 

109,204.82 

129,302.20 

120, 054. 75 

241,461.81 

32.5,9.54.47 

290, 493. 63 


$208,165.48 
1 017 750.97 


1908 






1909 






1,492,144.76 


1910 






1 331 568 20 


191] 


.^3-15. 62 

375.63 

605. 28 

268.85 

226. 93 

3. 047. 64 

1,805.49 

1,821 OS 

1,456.04 




1,337,915.09 

1,280,397.88 

881 7^8 73 


1912 


S8.5. 70 
191.96 
37.5. .38 
637.45 
445. 19 
1,318.12 
507. 00 
2.55. 40 
94G. 47 


1913 


1914 


198,828 ! 4,029.-364.97 
150,906 i 2, 873; 182. 84 
147,042 2,417,033.8,3 
146,121 2, .300, 918. 71 
143,250 2, 138, .328. 69 
118,500 ! 1,963,218.27 
106, .539 I 2,055,764.98 


776 265.68 


1915 


431 004 ''5 


1916 


289 Oil 70 


1917 


231 467.61 


1918 

1919 


224. 0.^7. 94 
209 704 77 


1920 


195 390.53 








Total.. . 


2, 317 769 -50 ^:<9 4.'?a SI 


9, 952. .56 


4,762.66 


1,086,341.67 


9 906 573 59 











DEPOSIT ORDERS ISSUED IN LIEU OF POSTAL SAVINGS. 



1915 


19 652 


$1 075 570.00 






$722 680 00 


1916 


24,054 
27,054 
24, 772 
22, lis 
18,583 


1,101,190.00 
1,481,845.00 
1,244, .3,3.5. 00 
1,145.460.00 
1. 143, 22-5. 00 


1 




1, 10:5, 430. 00 


1917 


1 




1 136 115 00 


1918 






1 441 225. 00 


1919 








1,225.025.00 


1920 








1 043 080.00 












Total 


136, 233 


7,191,625.00 








6,671,555.00 










Grand total 


2,454,002 


57, .524, 064. 81 


89,952.56 


$4,762.66 


$1,686,341.67 


16,578,128.59 




Canal Zone money orders paid by — 


Cash remitted 
to United 


Year. 


Marti- 
nique. 


Costa 
Rica. 


L'nitcd 
States. 


C'anal Zone. 


States Past 
Office De- 
partment. 


1907 






$1.5.81,251.91 
2,875,719.61 
3,.583.419.,57 
1,068; 650. 10 
3,7-2,5,996.12 
3,521, .511. 95 
4,288,948.31 
4, 070, 694. .55 
2, 699, .5,33. 06 
2 10' 740.97 


$208, 165. 48 

1,017,750.97 

1,492,144.76 

1,331.568.20 

1,337,915.09 

1,280,397.88 

881,728.73 

776,265.68 

'1,153,684.25 

'1,392,441.70 

'1,.367,582.61 

'1,665,282.94 

'1,434,729.77 

'1,238,470,53 


$1,8S4 000.00 


1908 






3,0.55,000.00 


1909 






3 392 000.00 


1910 


$2,267.60 
0,022.08 
8. 176. 95 
9,646.65 

11,684.18 
6,183.64 
5,979.45 
3, 500. 97 
2, 446. 50 
2,99.5.11 
1, 412. CO 




3, 535' 000. 00 


1911 


".«!,' 062.' 46' 
3,046.10 
4, 634. .53 
1,250.55 
1,172.02 


4,422,249.17 
3 .58" 000.00 


1912 


1913 


3 408 000. 00 


1914 


3 401 000 00 


1915 


3 053 407. OS 


1916 


2,125,043,89 


1917 


1 420. 12 1 1960 (W7. 67 


1,676,500.00 
1 6.55 000.00 


1918 


1,767.15 
l,.5;n..50 
1,814.10 


2,021,706.75 
1.776,375. ,55 
1,877,402,85 


1919 


1,671,000.00 


1920 


1 501 000.00 






Total 


60,315.13 


17,698.47 


40,152,048.33 


16,578,128.59 


38,419,200.14 




Grand total 


60,315 13 


17 698. 47 


40 1.52 048 33 


16,578,128.59 


38,419,200.14 










' ' 





' Deposii money orders paid by Canal Zone included 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



213 



SUMMARY. 

Total Cannl Zone orders issued $57, .524, 064.'81 Money order funds: 



Total Canal Zone orders pqid 56, SOS, 190. 52 



Total Canal Zone orders out- 
stand ins; unpaid '. 

Due United States by the Canal 

Zone 

Due Costa Riea by the Canal Zone . . 
Due Martinique by the Canal Zone. 
O veraL'e>! '. 



715, 874. 29 

10, 804. 75 

26S. 03 

49.00 

20.05 

727,016.12 



Cash on deposit with collector, 

Panama Canal $702, 924. 40 

Cash due from postmas- 
ters $24, 167. 74 

Less amoimt of fees in- 
cluded 76.02 

24,091.72 



727,016.12 



Table No. 42. — Postal Service — Statement shouing the monthly money order business- 
of the Canal Zone postal service during the fiscal year ended June SO, 1920. 



Month. 



1919. 
July , 

August 

September 

October 10;i22 

November 10,642 



1920. 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Money orders 

issued, including I 

deposit money llnterest 

orders. iPaid on 

I deposit 

money 

orders. 



Num- 
ber. 



9,081 
10, 139 

10,013 



December 13,250 



10,616 
9,945 

11,721 
9,828 
9, 753 

10,012 



Amount. 



$221,760.47 
219,721.76 

244, .573. 64 1 
241,694.2^: 
229,863.09 
2S9, 724. 85 



$637. 92 
9.56. 24 
838. 73 
422.11 
356. 60 
463.08 



Money orders paid by the 
Canal Zone post offices. 



Canal Zone money orders, 
paid by- 



United 
States. 



264,086.51 522.34 
275,802.09, 424.76 
327,360.211 825.40 
294,028.74 779.71 
281,842.16 1,133.66 
278,532.18, 626.53 



$15,936.2 

25. 005. 14 
21,043.9S 
19,600.64 

18. 194. 15 
24,039 "" 



22,333.66 
21,838.0 
26,867.82 
32, 252. 84 
24, 197. 75 
39, 183. 55 



Total 125, 122 3, 198, 9S9. 98; 7, 987. 08 290, 493. 63 946. 47 1, 238, 470. 53 1, 412. OOil, 814, 10 1, 877, 402. 85- 



Costa 
Rica. 



$5. 00 
50.00 



33. 00 



30.00 

50.2 

18.00 

6.2. 

104. 00 

649. 97 



Canal 
Zone.i 



$110,968.55 
126,304.91 
109,001.60 
75, 740. 52 
76, 788. 63 
89, 582. 5~ 



Marti- 
nique. 



Costa 
Rica. 



United 
States. 



73,249.86 
75,976.69 
118,842.70 
113,556.05 
135,709.22 
132,749.23 



I $263.00! 8130,240.3(i 

' i 159,906.41 

$751.50; 249.00 136,739.63 

117.00 129,505.76 

22.00; 125,9^3.39 

227.00 175.601 140,343.03 



135. OOi , 
68.50 . 
42. 00: 
32.00. 
17.00|. 



348. 00 



166,973.81 
157,4.:6.43 
256,608.79 
159,693.01 
1_38,685. 20 
175,267.03 



1 Including deposit money orders. 

Table No. 43. — Postal Service — Statement of audited revenues, fiscal years 1907 to 1920, 

inclusive. 





Receipts. 


Year. 


Miscella- 
neous. 


Money 
order fees. 


Interest 

on money 

order funds 


Stamp sales. 


Box rent. 


Newspaper 
postage. 


Total 
revenue. 


1907 




$9,832.65 
19,309.14 
21,720.93 
22,9i0.96 
23, 457. 98 
22,889.93 
23,366.31 
19, 408. 44 
, 13, 169. 55 
12,878.29 
12,371.28 
11,918.35 
10,424.16 
10,207.59 




$54,803.79 
72, 70?. 67 
74,241.87 
83,765.60 
82, .585. 21 
87, 497. 21 

100,. 599. 15 






$64,636.44 


190^! 








$0.87 

85. .53 

81.50 

28. 51 

144. 24 

31S.S4 

463.67 

988. 50 

1,410.39 

1,703.89 

1,825.38 

2, .553. 88 

1,782.53 


92, 018. 68 


1909 








96, 018. 33 


1910 








105 828.06 


1911 








10n,071.70 


1912 








110, ."31. 38 


1913 








124,284.30' 


1914 






90,792.63 
75, 202. 29 
76,337.08 
74,474.98 
83,939.74 
81,723.76 
87,096.72 




110,664.741 


1915 






$2,973.65 
5,029.50 
8,100.00 
8,147.30 
8,268.20 
8, 776. .55 


92 333. 99> 


1910 




95 655.26 


1917 

1918 


$1,207. .59 
1,344.75 
2,313.25 
1,951.04 


$12,884.57 
32,940.22 
25, 746. 20 
22,141.38 


110,742.31 
140 115.74 


1919 


131 029.4,5 


1920 


131,956.41 






Total 


6,817.23 


23:3, 935. .56 


93,712.37 


1,125,768.70 


41,295.20 


11,387.73 


1,512,916.79' 



214 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 44. — Postal Service — Statement of postal revenues, fiscal year ended June 

30, 19 JO. 



Month. 



Receipts. 



Miscel- 
laneous. 



Money- 
order 
fees. 



Interest 
on money- 
order ' 
funds. 



Stamp 
sales. 



Box ^^^^®' 

renf P^P" 

'^''°''- postage. 



Total 
revenue. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total.... 



$6.3. 84 
155. 39 
153.87 
251. 66 
63.28 
171. 62 



185. 52 
174. 73 
172. 88 
200. 09 
201. 57 
157. 19 



$695. 38 
809. 95 
822. 54 
796. 65 
832. 84 
1,093.23 



829. 06 
785. 09 
1, 033. 28 
827. 97 
821. 67 
859. 93 



$2,614.21 
866. 21 



4, 965. 78 

1, 027. 55 

785. 99 



2, 288. 10 
1,273.58 
1,221.60 
4, 557. 95 
1,246.22 
1, 294. 19 



1,951.64 



10, 207. 59 



22,141.38 



$6, 175. 13 
5, 614. 26 
6, 087. 30 
6, 103. 35 
6, 198. 60 
8, 883. 71 



7, 905. 41 
7, 429. 44 
8, 241. 26 
7, 543. 59 
7, 863. 27 
9, 051. 40 



87,096.72 



$581. 50 

48. 20 

1,326.65 

656. 95 

22.50 

1, 489. 45 



539. 75 

6.25 

1,428.00 

577. 65 

25.95 

2,073.70 



$178. 42 
139. 32 
164. 51 
135. 83 
132. 73 
180. 20 



132. 21 
140. 63 
190. 13 
137. 40 
123. 71 
127. 44 



$10, 308. 48 
7,633.33 
8, 554. 87 

12,910.22 
8,277.50 

12, 604. 20 



11,880.05 
9, 809. 72 
12,287.15 
13,844.65 
10,282.39 
13, 563. 85 



8, 776. 55 



1,782.53 



131,956.41 



Table No. 45. — Postal Service — Statement of postal-savings payments and deposit 
money-order transactions {in lieu ^f postal-savings system) for fiscal year ended June 
30, 1920. 



Month. 



Postal-savings 
certificates. 



Balance 

July 1, 

19i9. 



Paid. 



Deposit money orders. 



Balance 

July 1, 

19i9. 



Issued. 



Paid. 



July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December. , 



1919. 



$509.00 



$50.00 



$419,925.00 



1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Balance unpaid June 30, 1920. 

Total 



$84,540.00 
87, 015. 00 
78,910.00 
86, 790. 00 
72,450.00 
78, 700. 00 



102, 120. 00 
117,540.00 
111,790.00 
118,195.00 
108, 495. 00 
96, 680. 00 



459.00 



$94, 715. 00 
107, 185 00 
94, 175. 00 
61,965.00 
63,000.00 
73,320.00 



56, 255. 00 
63, 400. 00 
99, 440. 00 
95, 630. 00 
119,695.00 
114,. 300. 00 
520,070.00 



509.00 



509.00 419,925.00 



1,143,225.00 



1,563,150.00 



KEPORT OF AUDITOR. 



215 



Table No. 46. — Slatement of income, bureau of clubs and plaijgTounds, July 1, I'^iy, 

to June SO, 1920. 



Soda foiinl ains 

Cigars and candy 

Salable merchandise 

Movmg pictures 

Billiards 

Bowling 

Entertainments 

Tournaments 

Playgroimds 

Swimming pool 

Tennis clubs 

Library deposits , 

Rentals and interest , 

Membership 

Activities 

Supplies and equipment 

Maintenance and general 
expenses 



Total. 



$21,273.22 

25, 062 60 

5, 294. 10 

4, 18.3. 30 

1,741.42 

1,283.12 

746. 1.5 

167. 50 

124.69 



La Boca. 



$9, 752. 32 
11,273.97 



599.65 

442. 72 

63.90 



154. 75 
5.60 

178.61 

36.00 

2.15 

6.79 

13.02 



1.00 
613. 75 



13.34 

7.50 

182.00 



151.95 
14.81 



1.15 



60,273.02 23,118.06 



Balboa. 



$41, 229. 47 

34,855.14 

19,266.65 

20,976.67 

2,000.04 

1, 892. 40 

4, 136. 20 

78.00 

90.00 

6,624.98 

490. 60 

3.60 

467.50 

36.00 

137. 82 

135. 90 

87.19 



132, .508. 16 



Pedro 
Miguel. 



$4,449.64 

3, 869. 39 

234. 31 

2,069.00 

345. 40 

384. 22 

217.10 

27.75 



87.50 

'sg.'so 
"si .'is' 



11,774.96 



Paraiso. 



J6,316.21 

5,027.38 

2.41 

616. 85 

708. 91 

82.75 



/. la 
82.10 



7.00 

.50 

120.00 



12,971.86 



Gatim. 



810,520.13 

8,328.34 

1,734.61 

2, 878. 35 

447. 56 

845.43 

589. 65 



232. 00 
20.00 
60.00 



22.64 



1.15 



25,679.86 



Cfatim, 
silver. 



86, 550. 81 
5,443.04 



984. 65 
1,3.50.43 



1.33.60 
"422." 2.5 



195. 50 
"22.' 50 



3. .50 



15, 106. 28 





Cristobal. 


Cristobal, 
silver. 


Red 
tank. 


Balboa 
boat- 
house. 


Bureau 
clubs and 

play- 
grounds 
stock. 


General 
secre- 
tary. 


Total. 


Soda fountains 


$17,719.53 l$9,367.65 
18,370.58 21.2.S5. 62 


.14,651.61 
3,911 47 


$406.90 

695. 57 

1,393.95 






$132,237.49 
138 073 10 


Cigars and candy 






Salable merchandise 


3,210.92 
2,724.25 








31,136.95 

36 747 87 


Moving pictures 


SSO fi.5 


884.50 
845.50 






Billiards 


1,868.39 ' 1,510.67 
1,374.18 i 66.90 








11 261 04 


Bowling 








5 992 90 


Entertainments 


187. 90 




48,85 








6 059 45 


Tournaments 












282 00 


Playgrounds ' j 1,338.07 


81.20 








2 752 06 


Swimming pool 1 








6 624 98 


Tennis clubs 


234. 25 29. 00 










1 248 44 


Librarv deposits 


3.20 
128. 49 
16 00 
37.20 


15.50 

146.83 

2.00 


.50 
108. 50 








56 40 


Rentals and interest 


930. 80 




$1, 534. 17 


4 111 90 


Membership 




' 90 00 


Activities 


9.00 


448. 25 






862 66 


Bureau clubs and play- 
grounds stock 




$47,452.07 




47 452 07 


Supplies and equipment 












'157.50 


Maintenance and general 
expenses 


19.10 






5.45 
964.90 

876.40 






130 56 


Boat dues 










964 90 


Transfer fimds, Balboa 
Yacht Club surplus 












876 40 















Total 


45,893.99 


34,542.89 


10,541.13 


5,722.22 


47,452.07 


1,534.17 


427 lis 67 







216 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 47. — Statement of expenses, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, July 1, 

to June 30, 1920. 



1919, 



Soda fountain 

Cistars and candy 

Salable merchandise 

Movine pictures 

Billiards 

Bowling 

Entertainments 

Tournaments 

Playgrounds 

Swimming pool 

Tennis clubs 

Office help 

Maintenance and general ex- 
pense 

Books and periodicals 

Supplies and equipment 

Refunds 

Activities 

Bureau of clubs and play- 
grounds stock 

Rentals 

Membership 



A neon. 



045.42 

524. 81 
490. 28 
049. 14 
739. 91 
340.05 
711.65 
128.45 
216. 14 



209.06 
821. 49 

,638.33 
336. 47 

, 874. 42 



56. 82 



La Boca. 



$7,763.27 

9,449.87 



764. 70 
454. 58 
142. 50 
1.76 
11.70 
270. 70 



6.17 
140. 00 

1,521.23 

129.05 

2.3.36 

6.50 

175. 53 



Total 62,001.58 20,860.92 135,721.14 15,358.14 12,025.10 31,871.51 



Balboa. 



$41,378.47 

2', 230. 41 

17,334.54 

15,559.66 

2, 362. 19 

2, 188. 74 

5, 108. 05 

67.99 

412. 96 

7,429.93 

482. 24 

979.06 

7,844.56 

3S4. 14 

3, 779. 04 

3.00 

1, 109. 09 



6.50 
60.57 



Pedro 
Miguel. 



$4,487.94 

3,501.57 

196. 42 

2, 097. 40 

619. 56 

404. 07 

248.77 

14.17 

14.00 



16.58 
518. 75 

1,091.43 

187. 80 

1,679.34 

7.50 

272.84 



Paraiso. 



$5,455.52 
4, 193. 13 



684.63 
285.57 
117. SO 
3.15 
3.24 
155. 11 



180. 38 

623. 51 

93.55 

99.16 

.50 

129. 85 



Gatim. 



$11,373.59 

7,454.76 

1,599.07 

3, 253. 90 

799. 91 

780.26 

639. 80 



80.69 



62.54 
776. 00 

1, 853. 10 
209. 97 

2, 246. 97 

1.50 

739. 45 



Oatnn 
silver. 



$5,546.27 

4, 875. 73 



1, 189. 75 
772. 77 



151.81 
'4ii."76 



5.87 
45.00 

1,292.23 
94.55 

8.89 



14,585.03 



Soda fountain 

Cigars and candy 

Salable merchandise 

Moving pictures 

Billiards 

Bowling 

Entertainments 

Tournaments 

Playgrounds 

Swimming pool 

Tennis clubs 

Office help 

Maintenance and general ex- 
pense 

Books and periodicals 

Supplies and equipment 

Refunds 

Activities 

Bureau of clubs and play- 
grounds stock 

Rentals 

Boat dues 

Membership 



Total. 



Cristobal. 



645.08 
284.84 
387. 31 
969. 29 
856.23 
495. 00 
370. 59 



26.15 



200.18 
823.40 

,569.62 
275. 13 

,200.29 

14.53 

434. 12 



.50 

"ii'og' 



Cristobal 
silver. 



$8,048.72 
17,496.16 



1,011.86 

762. 04 

82.79 

5.78 



909. 21 



21.44 
194. 74 

972. 58 

129. 27 

5.26 

5.50 

146. 15 



Red 
Tank. 



$4, 355. 26 
3,521.06 



886. 87 

529. 87 

.34 

39.06 



75.03 



60.00 

688. 69 
108.56 
110. 74 
.50 
103. 13 



10,479.11 



Balboa 
boat- 
house. 



$302. 79 

539. 31 

1, 469. 25 



18. 00 
'""26." 69' 
1, 163. 92 



173. 97 
'■436.' 24' 



4, 782. 29 



Bureau 
clubs and 

play- 
grounds 

stock. 



152,034.13 



General 
secretary. 



$4.20 



434. 34 
12.00 



Total. 



$129, 402. 33 

117,071.65 

28,476.87 

32,471.40 

10,182.63 

6,551.55 

7,280.42 

225.55 

2,571.69 

7,4-17.93 

1,004.08 

4,565.51 

32,693.54 
1,960.49 

13, 201. 44 

39.53 

4,623.25 

52, 034. 13 

14.75 

652. 12 

129. 48 



525.54 452,600.34 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



217 



Table No. 48. — Suvimary of income and expenses, bvrcan of clubs and playarounds, 
July 1, 1919, to June SO, 1920. 





Ancon. 


La Boca. 


Balboa. 


Pedro 
Miguel. 


Paraiso. 


Gatun. 


Gatun 
silver. 


Soda-fountain inventory, 
July 1, 1919 


$242. 73 

1,5-43.99 

806. 4.5 

62,001.58 
1 1,574.67 


8204.89 
340.86 

20, 860. 92 
2, 280. 38 


$586.96 

1,135.87 

1,624.31 

135,721.14 
I 1,024.22 


$193.98 

219.92 

98.05 

15, 358. 14 
13,436.43 


$243. 71 

345.01 

2.37 

12,025.10 
650.73 


$264.51 

280.97 

68.62 

31,871.51 
16,057.63 


$138.65 


Cigars and candy inven- 
tory, July 1, 1919 

Salable merchandise iu- 
ventorv, Jiilv 1, 1919 . 


122. 52 


Total expenditures, fiscal 
year 1920 . . 


14,585.03 


Earnings, fiscal year 1920. . 


1,040.03 


Total 


63,020.08 


23,687.05 


138,044.06 


12,433.66 


13,266.92 


26,427.98 


15,886.23 






Soda-fountain inventory, 
June 30 1920 


' 340.96 

1,715.09 

690. 41 

60,273.02 


190. 73 
378. 26 


566. 42 

3,004.77 

1,964.71 

132, 508. 16 


240.47 

333.08 

78.55 

11,774.96 


39.78 
255.28 


199.77 

407. 2.5 

141.10 

25,679.86 


195. 80 


Cigars and candy inven- 
tory, June 30, 1920 

Salable merchandise in- 
ventory, June 30, 1920. . 

Total income, fiscal vear 
1920 


584. 15 


23,118.06 


12,971.86 


15, 106. 28 






Total 


63,020.08 


23,687.05 


138,044.06 


12,433.66 


13, 266. 92 


26, 427. 98 


15, 886. 23 









Cristobal. 


Cristobal 
silver. 


Red 
tank. 


Balboa 
boat- 
house. 


Bureau of 
clubs and 

play- 
grounds 
stock. 


General 
secre- 
tary. 


Total. 


Soda-fountain inventory, 
July 1, 1919 . ... 


$305.68 
823.83 
427. 95 


$136.00 
351.38 










$2,317.11 
5, 209. 39 


Cigars and candy inven- 
tory, July 1, 1919 

Salable merchandise in- 
ventory, July 1, 1919 

Bureau of clubs and play- 
groimds stock hiveii- 
tory, July 1, 1919 


$45. 04 














3,027.75 








$7,294.83 

52,034.13 
710.61 




7,294.83 


Total expenditures, fiscal 
year 1920 


62,564.35 
115,468.85 


29,791.50 
5, 026. 04 


10,479.11 
461.35 


$4, 782. 29 
1,186.89 


$525. 54 


4.52. 600. 34 


Earnings, fiscal year 1920. . 


1,008.63 ; 115; 197. 14 


Total 


48,652.96 


35,304.92 


10, 985. 50 


5, 969. 18 


60, 039. 57 


1,534.17 


455, 252. 58 






Soda-foimtain inventory, 
Jime 30, 1920 


571.05 

1,624.02 

563.90 


117.09 

644.94 


104. 49 

339.88 


34.64 
103.05 
109. 27 






2, 607. 20 


Cigars and candv inven- 
torv, June 30, i920 . 






9,390.97 
3,547.94 


Salxt5le merchandise in- 
ventory, June 30, 1920 . . 






Bureau of clubs and play- 
grounds stock inven- 
tory, June 30. 1920 






12,-587.50 
47,452.07 


1,534.17 


12, 587. 50 


Total income, fiscal year 
1920 


45,893.99 


34,542.89 


10,541.13 


5, 722. 22 


427,118.67 






Total 


48,652.96 


35, 304. 92 


10,985.50 


5, 969. 18 


60,039.57 


1,534.17 


455, 252. 28 







1 Loss. 



218 



THE PAIS^AMA CANAL,. 



Table Xo. 49. — Bureau of clubs and plat/grounds, balance sheet, June 30, 19^0. 



ASSETS. 

Cash on hand: 

Secretaries' balances 87, 303. 83 

Deposited with collector.. 53,803.17 

$61,107.00 

Inventories: 

Sola fountain 2, 607. 20 

Cigars and candy 9, 390. 97 

Salable merchandise 3, 547. 94 

Bureau clubs and play- 
grounds stock 12,587.50 

28; 133. 61 

Accounts receivable: 

Registered bills 10, 131. M 

Gatun soldiers 6.44 

Balboa Gun Club 2,020.06 

12,158.00 

Total 101, 398. 61 



LIABILITIES. 

Surplus: 

To June 30, 1919 S7S, 021. 25 

Profit, current fiscal year ' 15, 197. 14 



Accounts payable: 

.\ udited vouchers 38, 374. 50 

Panama Railroad Com- 
pany (swimming pool). 200. 00 



862,824.11 



38, 574. 50 



Total 101,398.61 



1 Loss. 

Table No. 50. — Statements of amounts paid under Executive order No. 1902, dated 
Mar. 20, 1914, as compensation to employees injured and on account of deaths of em- 
ployees injured tvhile directly engaged in actual work with The Panama Canal and 
Panama Railroad Company from July 1, 1919, to June SO, 1920, and a statement of 
amounts paid under act of Sept. 7, 1916, as compensation to employees injured tvhile 
in the performance of duty ivith The Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany from July 1, 1919, to June SO, 1920. 



Payments under the 
act of Sept. 7, 1916. 



Injury. 



Death. 



Payments 

under the 

Executive 

order of 

Mar. 20, 

1914, injury. 



E.xecutive office 

Motor cars, Panama Canal 

Clubs and playgroimds 

Lock operation division 

Electrical division 

Dredging division 

Municipal engineering 

Office engineer and survey 

Meteorology and hydrography 

Marine division 

Mechanical division 

Quartermaster's division 

Storehouses 

Print ing plant 

Fuel-oil plant 

Subsistence 

Accounting department 

Building division 

Fortification 

Health department 

Civil government 

Land office and special attorney 

Maintenance of way 

Panama Railroad stables and baggage transfer. 

Motor cars, Panama Railroad 

Coaling plants 

Hotels 

Commissary division 

Plantations 

Cattle steamers 

Cattle ranches 

Poultry farm 

H og farm 

Dairy farm 

Railroad transportation 

Receiving and forwarding agencies 

Dams and back fills 

Terminals 



Total. 



$3.60 

457. 98 

511.90 

2, 073. 25 

2,932.47 

13.78 

11.55 

324. 27 

7, 108. 06 

567. 96 

340.94 

84.13 



92.01 



7, 776. 55 
252.99 

1, 502. 47 
900. 77 



588.66 



3,449.42 
13.05 

1,015.11 
65.50 
154.23 

1,094.36 



3.00 

24.33 

2, 738. SO 

8, 699. 28 

28.43 



S45. 00 



725.49 
229. 68 



765. 32 



1,493.11 
145.98 



452. 33 



525.87 



113.72 



42,828.85 



4, 496. 50 



$1,073.95 
1,073.95 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



219 



Table No. 5]. — Statement of amounts paid under the act oj May SO, 1908, to employees 
as compensation on account of deaths of employees injured in the course of employment; 
amounts paid under act of Feb. 24, 1909, for injuries lasting 15 days or less; amounts 
paid under Executive order of Feb. 26, 1913; amounts paid under Executive order No. 
1902, dated Mar. 20, 1914; and amounts paid under act of Sept. 7, 1916, covering period 
from Aug. 1, 1908, to June 30, 1920. 





Injuries. 


Deaths. 


Under act 

of Feb. 24, 

1909. 


Total. 


Total payments, by fiscal years: 

Aug. 1 1908 to June 30, 1909 ... 


832,355.71 
96,810.33 
168,416.23 
166, 620. 21 
150,943.79 
111,240.75 
17, 703. 40 
168. 00 


$3,682.79 
21,053.22 
3.5,248.39 
37, 534. 68 
23, 792. 02 
41,015.34 
14, 268. 97 
1,206.00 
545.40 


$8,225.16 
16,010.30 
49,957.80 
55,838.25 
49,335.91 
33,704.92 


$44,263.66 


July 1, 1909, to June 30, 1910 


1.33,873.85 


July 1, 1910, to June 30, 1911 


253, 622. 42 


July 1, 1911, to June 30, 1912 


259, 993. 14 


July 1, 1912, to June 30, 1913 


224,071.72 


July 1, 1913, to June 30, 1914 


185,901.01 


July 1 1914 to Jime 30, 1915 . . : 


31, 972. 37 


July 1, 1915, to June 30, 1916 




1,374.00 


July 1 1916 to June 30, 1917 




545. 40 


July 1, 1917, to June 30, 1918 









July 1, 1918, to June 30, 1919 


163. 54 






163. 54 










Total 


744,421.96 


178,346.81 


213,072.34 


1,135,841.11 






Payments under Executive order of Feb. 26, 1913 








1.3,227.62 

4, 283. 82 
84, 889. 62 


Payments under Executive order of Mar. 20, 1914: 

Apr. 1, 1914, to June 30, 1914 


4,283.82 
41,871.91 
32,341.85 

9,748.10 






July 1 1914 to June 30 1915 


43,017.71 
33,321.07 
11,400.95 

740. 18 




July 1, 1915 to June 30, 1916 . 




65, 662. 92 


July 1, 1916, to June 30, 1917 




21,149.05 


July 1 1917 to June 30 1918 




740. 18 


July 1, 1918 to June 30, 1919 


1,547.34 
1,073.95 

334. 18 




1,547.34 


July 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920 






1,073.95 
334. 18 


Payments under provisions of contracts between 












39,418.37 










Total 








1, 368, 168. 16 










Amounts paid to Panama Railroad employees: 

Apr. 1, 1914, to June 30, 1914 


770.61 

10, 275. 45 

9,056.66 

3,146.70 

185. 98 






770. 61 


July 1, 1914, to June 30, 1915 . .... 


2, 300. 42 
3, 330. 24 




12, 575. 87 


July 1, 1915, to June 30, 1916 




12,386.90 
3, 146. 70 


July 1, 1916, to June 30, 1917 




Julj' 1 1917 to June 30 1918 






185. 98 


Payments made by the Panama Railroad Company for 






614. 60 


Payments under the act of Sept. 7, 1916: 
Sept. 7, 1916 to June 30, 1917 


15,845.04 
42,396.54 
93,412.48 

42,828.85 


13, 961. .57 
3,848.77 

10, 798. 06 
4,496.50 




29, 806. 61 


July 1, 1917, to June 30, 1918 . 




46,245.31 


July 1, 1918, to June 30, 1919 




104, 210. 54 


July 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920 





47, 325. 35 






Grand total 




1 


1,625,436.63 











220 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 52. — Number of injaries, by extent of (Hsability, for each division or depart- 
ment. 







Number of injuries resulting 


in temporary disability of— 






3 

o 


J3 

i 




M 








00 


1 

00 




03 

00 
<N 
U 









60 

FL, 


Executive office 


2 

2 

2 

101 

69 

231 

433 

3 

2 

50 

806 

77 

99 

16 

4 

35 

3 

474 

55 

134 

14 

115 

1 
279 

7 

287 

4 

7 

261 

1 

18 

24 

744 
108 






1 

2 




1 






2 

2 

2 

99 

68 

227 

423 

3 

2 

50 

791 

72 

99 

16 

4 

34 

3 

464 

55 

134 

14 

111 

1 
271 

6 
283 

4 

7 
248 

1 

18 
-23 

730 
108 




Motor cars, Panama Canal. . . . 












Clubs and plavgrounds 






2 
9 

8 
24 
49 

2 










Lock opera! ion 'ii^'lsion 

Electrical division 


1 


1 


69 

44 

151 

245 


5 

7 
25 
68 

1 


11 

5 

16 

4.6 


5 
4 

15 


i 




1 

3 


4 


3 




3. 


Office en'4ncer and surveys... 




Meterolo?v and hydrography. 






i 

29 
500 
31 
57 
10 
4 

17 

2 

288 

36 

82 

3 

62 

1 

178 
1 

191 
1 

4 
88 


1 

4 

53 
10 
9 
2 


3' 

37 
5 
5 
1 










6 

117 

15 

11 

2 


8 
84 
11 
17 

1 




Mechanical division 


3" 


4 


11 


Quartermaster di\'ision 


2 


Printina; plant 








Fuel oil plant 












1 


6 

""m 

6 

20 

3 

20 


1 
48 

3 
12 

4 
12 


4 






-Vccountiu-j department 






3 


2 


26 
8 

17 
3 

10 


22 
2 
3 
1 

7 


5 


Fortification division 




Health department 
















Maintenance of way 


1 




3 


Panama Railroad stables and 
baggage transfer 




Coaling plants 


2 





26 

2 

37 


28 

2 

30 


21 
1 

14 
2 
1 

35 


18 
....... 

1 

1 

23 


6 


Hotels 


1 




1 


4 




1 




Cattle steamers 






""'43' 

1 
5 

7 

113 

4 


1 
59 






3 




10 






Dairy farm 






8 
10 

350 
102 


4 
4 

128 
1 


1 
2 

89 
1 


50 




Railroad transportation 

Receiving and forwarding 
agencies 




1 
2 


12 














Total 


4,468 


17 


15 


2,568 


618 


572 


392 


225 


4,375 


61 







REPORT OF AUDITOR. 221 

Table No. 53.— iVaiure of nonfatal cases, hy department or division. 





§ 
ll 


-3 
"3 

e 

3 

M 


a 
o 

§ 

o 
O 


a o 

3 
O 


1 
ft 

< 


_3 

1 
o 

Q 


3 

2 


Sprains 

and 
strains. 




o 
o 
< 






■2 


O 













1 

1 

2 

28 

23 

106 

213 

1 








1 






2 




1 








1 








2 




















2 


Lock-operation division 

Electrical division 


38 
26 
75 
139 
2 

1 

25 

320 

30 

36 

4 

2 
13 

1 
180 
26 
28 

4 
43 


5 
5 
14 
9 




1 
1 

5 
4 


|l ' 


2 
1 

4 

7 


9 

6 

11 

29 


12 

6 

- 8 

17 


1 

■■"4" 


100 
69 




1 
1 


6 

7 


230 


Municipal engineering 

Office engineer and surveys. 
Meteorology and hy- 


430 
3 










1 
2 
32 
7 
4 










2 




5 
61 


13 






1 
7 


3 

50 
4 
10 

\ 

3 
1 
32 
4 
4 
1 
6 


1 

80 

4 

3 


""3" 
1 
2 


50 


Mechanical division 

Quartermaster's division . . . 


2 


238 

26 

40 

10 

1 

9 


10 
2 

1 


3 


806 
74 


3 
1 




99 




. .1 


16 














4 




9 




1 












35 


Accou nting department 








1 
25 

1 
2 
1 
3 


1 

8 


3 


5 
3 

7 
1 
3 


3 


202 
17 

78 
3 
52 


2 


2 


14 
3 
3 
3 
5 


4 

""2 

1 
1 


471 




55 




2 




134 




14 


Maintenance of way 

Panama Railroad stables 


1 




114 

1 


Coaling plants 


134 
2 

107 

1 

4 

48 


15 
1 

13 


1 


81 
2 

119 
3 
1 

181 
1 
5 
8 

235 
56 


2 




8 


4 
1 

1 


8 

1 

26 


24 




277 


Hotels 


7 


Commissary division 


2 




6 


11 


2 


287 
4 




1 

1 








1 

8 








7 


Cattle ranches 


1 






6 


7 


6 


258 




1 




12 

7 

380 
35 


1 
5 

13 
1 


3 
















18 


Railroad transportation 

Receiving and forwarding 


1 


1 
1 


2 
41 


4 


1 

58 
4 






24 


6 
6 


2 
6 


744 




108 














Total 


1,725 


182 


9 


1,756 


36 


11 


156 


40 


280 


218 


38 


4,451 







222 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 54. 



-Nature of injury in nonfatal cases, vith the amount of expenditures in 
each class. 



Nature of injury. 


Total 
injuries. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


Bruises, contusions, and abrasions 


1,725 
182 

8 
1,757 


«4,369.2& 


Burns and scalds 


1,005.50 


Cuts, punctures, and lacerations 


22.75 


Other 


6,516.15 






Total 


3,672 








Sprains and strains: 

Hernia 


40 
115 

73 
51 
41 


659. IS 


Back 


317.00 


Ankle, foot, or leg 


193.29 


Wrist or arm 


155.67 


Other 


45.17 






Total 


320 








Dislocation 


11 


91.81 






Fractures: 

Arm 


26 
9 
13 
34 
30 
19 
7 
2 
16 


1,933.06 


Hand 


mim.Q& 


Finger and fingers 


T, 466. 33 


Leg 


3,109.13 


Foot 


1,393.95 


Toe or toes 


275.48 


Ribs 


?38.69 


Skull 


' 202.88 


Other 


565.83 






Total 


156 








Eye injuries: 

Loss of both eyes 






Loss of one eve 












Other 


218 


388. 5$ 






Total 


218 








Amputations: 


1 

1 

10 

4 


119.44 


Riglit hand 






179.83 


Right fingers, 2 or more 


1,038.04 


Left arm 




Left hand 








9 
4 
2 


160.32 


I>eft fingers, 2 or more 


11.35 


Leg 


433.51 


Foot . 






5 


231.72 






Total 


36 








Other temporary and permanent injuries: 

Poisoning and occupational diseases 


37 

1 


48.31 




44.44 








38 










4,451 


25,123.68 







REPORT OF AUDITOR. 
Table No. 55. — Cause of injuries. 



223 



t 


8 
o 

> 

3 
I 


C3 

n 
O 

C3 
1 

a 
1 

t-i 
O 

1 


a 

3 

1 
>^ 

a 

OS 

3 

o 


1 

-S 

3 

o 

a 

o 

8 


1 

a 

03 


d 
o 

> 

■3 

1 


.9 

'3 

3 


1 
bo 

.9 

be 
•n 

ft 




> 

.g 

bO 
g 

s 


bO 


-o . 
a >> 

03.3 

p< 

bc^ 

_o 

"o 

i- 


1 


1 

-3 


3 
|> 

•3 
1 

i 
•s 
1 










3 
1 
15 


4 
1 
4 
1 


"■'2' 

5 
1 


2 

15 
57 
10 
3 














10 

43 

5 

10 








35 












2 


6 


125 










19 






1 




1 






6 


25 














1 








1 


9 
5 


8 
40 


5 
..... 


42 

36 

7 


19 

17 


1 


3 
4 


55 


Contact with sharp instruments or 






1 




30 






1 




1 












2 








4 
















1 


















2 
10 


..... 

2 
3 

8 

1 
7 


4 
8 
1 

1 
1 

2 
4 
1 
5 

7 
6 

"'9' 
4 










5 










11 
8 
5 

14 

8 

30 

1 

25 

9 

62 

12 

59 

8 

5 

3 


19 

1 






7 


65 














1 










2 
5 

3 

7 






1 
4 

2 
3 


4 








1 


9 

8 
12 






25 


Hot metals, liquids, inflammable or 










57 




1 










40 
















1 






17 
1 

11 
3 
3 
2 


1.0 
1 
4 
3 
3 
7 


19 






6 


100 












3 










17 
8 

25 
5 
1 
1 


2 




3 
2 

1 


128 










25 














17 














35 














2 


6 
















. 1 . 




Drowning 








1 








1 






Total 


2 


2 


2 


101 


108 


69 


433 


231 


3 1 2 


50 


806 











224 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table No. 55. — Cause of injuries — Continued. 





1 

C3 

3 


3 

o 

1 
o 


.g 


1 
o 

3 


a 
% 
1 

3 


.s 

"S 

3 
o 

o 

< 


d 
o 

'> 
'■5 

hO 

a 
-5 
a 

3 

M 


c 
.2 

'> 

-3 

a 
o 

? 

'■S 

o 


a 
1 

Si 


1 

a 

a 

> 
o 

> 

3 






a 

(3 

n 

.a 

03 


1 

M 

03 - 
bC.O 

s 

m 


Animals, kicks, bites, falls from 


3 


1 










3 

14 

39 

26 

6 


1 

2 

7 


9 
2 
11 


2 






Blow of hammer or other object 










1 

33 
2 




Caught lietween two hard bodies 

Collapse of material 


7 
1 


24 


"i' 

6 


1 


2 

2 






Contact with machinery 


8 ;:;;: 




1 


1 




Contact with gear 














1 


Contact with rough edge or surface. 


2 

7 


6 
11 






4 




28 

31 
2 
1 


3 

8 


5 
46 




6 

10 
2 




Contact with sharp instruments or 
splinters, etc 


2 






Derailment of locomotive or cars 










Explosion of boilers, pipes, gases 










1 








1 




Explosion of powder or dynamite 










1 








Electric current ." 




















1 

6 
3 




Fall from elevations 


5 


1_ 




1 


3 


1 

1 


61 
5 
1 

19 

4 
20 


4 
4 

""e" 

2 
2 


6 
3 
4 
9 

8 
2 






Fall from cars 




Fall into excavations 
















7 


2 
3 


1 
1 


1 


9 

8 

1 




2 

'"'i' 


1 

1 
6 




Hot metals, liquids, inflammable or 
corrosive substance 




Lifting, pushing, pulling 


3 


7 
1 




Operating hand car or speeder 








Struck by flying object.. . 


6 








1 


33 
4 
76 
11 
72 
17 
1 


4 
..... 

..... 

3 


3 

1 

4 
1 
11 
5 
2 
1 


1 
"z 
"i 

'"2 


12 
4 

12 
2 

8 
4 

1 




Struck by engine, cars, collision 


5 3 
11 22 


1 
1 








Struck by falling body 




1 
1 
1 




1 


Struck by swinging or loose object 




6 

5 

..... 




Steoping on nails, thorns, etc 


7 
2 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 


1 




Using simple hand tools 




Vapors, gases or poisonous substance. . . 










Resisting or making arrest, fighting. . . . 


1 




2 










































Total 


77 


99 


16 


4 


35 


3 


474 


55 


134 


14 


115 


1 







EEPOKT OF AUDITOR. 
Table No. 55 — Cause of injuries — Continued. 



225 





1 

a 
6 


4 

1 


1 

a 




1 

1 


^ 

1 

CO 



'S 



1 

i 




w 


a 





1 


.g 

1 

tj) 

.a 


3 


EH 








6 

1 
31 

1 

8 

1 

23 

52 






11 
1 
2 




7 






52 




5 

29 
5 
9 

1 
26 

9 


'"2 
..... 








5 

182 

1 
5 


95 


Caught between two hard bodies 




2 




2 


3 


634 




75 
















90 
















3 








16 
141 


1 


1 
5 


2 
3 


64 
28 


329 


Contact with sharp instruments or splinters, 
etc .... 


1 




488 




16 








1 


..... 


1 










3 


14 
















3 




2 

28 
















1 
20 
19 


IS 




1 


13 
5 
2 

22 

14 
20 




3 


t 

2 
15 

2 

1 






2 
3 


279 








57 




2 
10 

17 
10 


1 
1 


1 








28 






1 

1 


2 
2 


26 

10 
34 


200 


Hot metals, liquids, inflammable or corro- 






155 








212 














3 




26 
2 
75 
12 
5 
1 
1 
3 
1 


..... 


7 

5 

42 

14 

14 

2 

2 

1 






1 






2 


14 

71 

185 

56 

12 

1 

2 

5 


299 












117 






1 


42 
5 

13 
1 
3 
1 






1 

1 


717 








162 




1 








271 










98 


Vapors, gases or poisonous substance 










3 


31 








1 


2? 








3 
























Total 


279 


7 


287 


4 


7 


261 1 


18 


24 


744 


4,468 











Table No. 56. — Receipts, issues, and transfers of stores and purchases charged to divi- 
sions during fiscal year 1919-20. 



Month. 



July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. , 
December . . 

January 

February. . , 

March , 

April 

May 

June 



Eeceipts by- 



Purchases. 



$456, 196. 47 
333,816.41 
674,447.31 
575, 280. 08 
419,535.93 
622,000.10 
765,369.01 
503, 189. 74 
505,229.51 
391,119.50 
625,448.76, 
803,496.72 



Transfers. 



S337,151.93 
317, 678. 34 
439, 916. 26 
539,115.52 
342, 002. 64 
478, 202. 95 
814,293.06 
485,000.06 
392,574.46 
917, 488. 87 
743, 641. 67 
583, 828. 91 



Total 6, 675, 129. 54 6, 391, 494. 67 



Regular stock in storehouses, July 1, 1919 . . 
Obsolete material in obsolete storehouses 

July 1, 1919 

Material in hands of divisions July 1, 1919. . 



Manufac- 
ture. 



847,825.47 
42,014.33 
36,146.34 
36, 326. 03 
41,983.09 
64, 647. 62 
33, 798. 64 
37, 696. 72 
41,637. Hi 
32, 860. 78 
35, 924. 74 
77,213.35 



Issued by- 



Issues. 



Transfers. 



528, 074. 22 



6,312,836.28 

150, 212. 70 
879,022.45 



$607, 455. 19 
659, 204. 13 
637, 492. 43 
707,332.671 
569,777.411 
961,036.82 
989, 219. 74 
622,209.74 
795,200.95! 
765, 843. 95 
715,532.811 
882, 699. 12 



$205,054.74 
217,076.46 
290,317.02 
294, 644. 92 
28,1,563.05 
.301,026.53 
431,153.64 
222,621.65 
286,002.60 
280, 426. 72 
329, 494. 99 
379, 384. 85 



Sales. 



$116,702.52 

91,649.87 

75,314.31 

83, 737. 2.5 

53,293.30 

109,533.6- 

204,709.13 

144,200.92 

229,598.84 

245, 662. 12 

365,334.55, 

201,453.28 



Purchases 
direct to 
divisions. 



$139,527.88 
171,592.34 
214,383.91 
205.610.37 
202, 063. 10 
130, 8.58. 15 
147, 243. 84 
230, 742. 32 
431,242.41 
232. 7.59. 43 
373.051.64 
499, 789. GP 



1,921,189.70 2,978,864.! 



5,913,064.96 3,580,767.17 

I 
Regular stock in storehouses July 

1, 1920 |5, 354, 786. 34 

Obsolete material in obsolete store- i 

houses July 1. 1920 ! 27,365.11 

Material in hanos of divisions July I 

1,1920 546,618.22 



8847—20 15 



226 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table No. 57. — Comparative statement of store balance, July J, 1919, and July 1, 1920. 



Quartermaster store (by commodities). 



July 1, 1919. 



July 1, 1920. 



1. Air-brake material 

2. Alcohol 

3. Alimi and other chemicals for filtering water 

4. Arms and ammunition 

5. Asbestos and magnesia and compoimds 

6. Asphalt, petvoleimi residue and mineral tar, pitch, and rosin 

7. Blocks, chain and tackle 

8. Boilers, steam 

9. Bolts, nuts, rivets, and washers 

10. Books, educational, library, and reference 

11. Bricks, building, fire and paving 

12. Brooms, mops, dusters, and scrub brushes 

13. Building material (not otherwise specified) 

14. Buoys 

15. Cars, hand, push, and inspectors', and velocipedes 

16. Castings, rough— brass and copper 

17. Castings, rough— iron and steel 

18. Cement, Portland (including bags) 

19. Chain 

20. Cleanings and toilet supplies 

21. Construction equipment, accessories, and supplies 

22. Containers, nonexpendable (except cement bags) 

23. Conveying and lifting equipment, accessories, and parts 

24. Diving outfits and parts 

25. Drafting supplies 

26. Drugs, chemicals, vaseline, naphtha, and benzine 

27. Educational supplies 

28. Ejectors, injectors, lubricators, pop valves, blow-off cocks, water gauges 

and parts 

29. Electrical equipment, accessories and parts (ex lock machinery) 

31. Electricians' supplies (not otherwise specified) 

32. Engines, steam, and parts 

33. Explosives and blasting batteries and parts , 

34. Farm, plantation, and cattle ranch implements, supplies and parts 

35. Fire preventing and fire fighting equipment, supplies and parts (not hose) , 

36. Fittings, pipe and valve , 

37. Flags (railroad excluded) , 

39. Floating equipment, parts for 

40. Forage, feed, and bedding , 

41. Fuel, coal, anthracite 

42. Fuel, coal, bituminous , 

43. Fuel, crude oil , 

44. Furnace and foundry supplies (except pig iron) 

45. Furniture and equipment (office) and parts 

46. Furniture, other than o.fice 

47. Gasoline , 

48. Gauges, steam and vacuum 

49. Gla.ss, window, sash and plate 

50. Glue, gelatine, rubber, and asbestos cement 

51. Hair, feathers and moss 

52. Hardware (except nails and spikes) 

53. Harness, saddlers', and other corral equipment and supplies 

54. H ose 

56. Instruments, equipment, and supplies, surgical, medical and laboratory. 

57. Iron, in pigs 

58. Iron and steel, in bars and slieets (ex G. I. roofing) 

59. Iron and steel, reinforcing 

60. Ladders and scaffolds '. 

61. I^aundry apparatus, aece.ssories and parts 

62. Lawn uiowers and rakes (other than hand operated) 

63. Leather and liolting '. ' ' 

64. Lime, plasfer, and clay 

66. Lumlier, jiiiic, fir, and redwood 

67. Lumber, fancy 

68. Magazines and newspapers 

69. Metals, in pigs (excepyng iron) 

70. Medals, in sheets and bars (excepting iron), and steel 

71. Meters, current , and parts 1 

72. Meljers, water, oil, and air 

73. Nads antl spikes 

74. Ollico supplies and stationery 

7.'). (Jilcloth a lid li iioleum .' 

76. Oils, iiliuninating 

77. f)il, liil)ri(ating, and greases, graphite, welding and cu1,^ing compounds. . 

78. Packing, calking, and gaskc(s 

79. Packing r o ;ep(;vcles (expendable) and o^her packing supplies 

80. Paints and |)aint(TS' sup]jlies, putty, varnishes, shellacs, linseed oils, 

drier, Idler, whi^e and red lead, e^c '. 

81. Paper, packing 

83. Phonographic supplies and parts 



$32, 143, 82 

22,429.07 

237. 18 



11,528.63 
63,419.67 

6, l.SO. S3 

1,094.90 
53,004. .')2 

4,300.00 
10, 509. 04 
> 3,SS8.25 
56,724.94 
56, 752. 54 

4,227.79 

318,4.59.33 

23, 106. 89 

16.50 

' Indicates credit balances caused by credit to storehouses for issues of these articles, the charges for 
which were not received until after closing of books for the current fiscal year. 



1,223.14 

12, 187. 58 

9,187.86 

1,332.93 

102, 759. 21 

11,00 

9,830.90 

8,888.62 

23, 022, 01 

950. 27 

1,203.08 

38, 345. 42 

91,067.35 

20, 633. 22 

21,519.82 

12,007.35 

82, 746. 72 

56,958.18 

112,293,62 

68.42 

631. 76 

58,692.77 

78.42 

43,381.40 

368,510.76 

1,591.60 

6,343.02 

61, 379, 79 

8,330.19 

3,781.17 

118,247.27 

4,196.33 

801,967.42 

16, 480, 13 

6,076,32 

2, 775, 07 

205. 88 

66,32,5.10 

4,396.55 

13, 555, 20 

95,023.12 

517.81 

33, 752. 42 

3, 732. 56 

' 1,926,78 

176, .312, 10 

6, 505. 32 

58,436.67 

2,371.74 

30, 569. 66 

570,239.11 

35,500.20 

106. 04 

826, 99 

105.33 

13,574.96 

8, 593. 21 

186, 124. 12 

52,616.99 

136.22 

23,381.92 

79, 784. 54 

3,234.25 

1,037.77 

39, 941. .53 

3,630.96 

4,053.01 

28, 574. 59 

86, 605. 33 

57, 860. 70 

6,023.85 

272,119.46 
1,040.26 



829,356.41 

9,977.73 

856.11 

' 35. 21 

81.65 

2,501.54 

11,614.27 

904.36 

80, 473. 89 

98.98 

6,546.25 

7, 837. 29 

58,44.5.52 

949. 28 

1,885.98 

34,962.85 

88,098.20 

102,982.16 

10, 266. 49 

4, 225. 40 

80,386.87 

96,997.59 

103,741.02 

1, 190. 33 

167. 26 

18, 750. 57 



33,047.61 

478,937.18 

1,241.67 

6,328.87 

30, 086. 94 

303. 76 

16,132.64 

142,141.56 

3,513.50 

,538,636.15 

6,581.62 

2,971.40 

2,263.97 

559, 47 

52,302.24 

5,094.81 

11,873.32 

102,706.14 

1,099.11 

37,929.72 

2,952.21 

16, 785. 52 

170,011.08 

8,662.17 

25, 636, 25 

3,080.80 

24, 736. 71 

250,191.60 

22,6.50.82 

357.91 

455.97 

7S0. 95 

21,327.79 

5,023. ,56 

220, 292. 68 

43,957.46 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



227 



Table No. bl .—Comparative statement of store balance, July 1, 1919, and July 1, 1920— 

Continued. 



Quartermaster store (by commodities). 



July 1, 1919. 



July 1, 1920. 



106. 
107. 
lOS. 
109. 
110. 
111. 
112. 
113. 
114. 
115. 
116. 
117. 
118. 
119. 
120. 
121. 
122. 
123. 
124. 
125. 
126. 
127. 
128. 
129. 
130. 
131. 
132. 
133. 

134. 
135. 
136. 
137. 
138. 
139. 
140. 
141. 
142. 
143. 
145. 
147. 
148. 
149. 
151. 
152. 
153. 



Piling 

Pipe and fittings (vitrified) 

Pipe and tuhinf; (metal) 

Plinnlnng'material (riot otherwise specified) 

Police equipment (except arms and ammunition) 

Polisliiii g and alirading supplies 

Printing-plant equipment and supplies (not including paper). 

Production e^iiiipment, accessories, and parts 

Pumps, and parts, including electric 

Rails. 



Recreation equipment and parts 

Refrigerating equipment, accessories, and parts. 
Refrigeration supplies . . '. 



EOLLING STOCK, PARTS FOR. 



Locomotives 

Freight and passenger train cars. 

Motor cars, railroad . . .". 

Rope. 



Rubber products (except packing and belting and tires) 

Sashes, doors, blinds, molding, and capping, screening, strips, etc. 

Scales and parts 

Scientific equipment and parts (except surgical and surveying) 

Screening, bronze and copper , 

Searchlights and lighthouse equipment and supplies 

Signal material (automatic) '. 

Stone, sand, gravel ,' and slate 

Subsistence equipment 

Subsistence supplies. .'. 

Surveying instruments and supplies 

Tanks. 



Telegraph and telephone equipment, accessories, and parts 

Tents and parts, flies, and tarpaulin's .' 

Thermometers' and barometers 

Ties, cross and switch 1 

Tiles, building ' 

Tools, miscellaneous 

Tools, pneumatic and electric 

Track material'(other thaii rails and ties) 

Trucks, warehouse, etc '. 

Tubes, boiler and condenser 

Vehicles (animal-drawn), accessories, and parts 

Vehicles (motor-drawn), accessories, and parts (railroad motor cars and 

fire equipment excluded) ' .' 

Waste. 



Water cranes and standpipes 

Wearing apparel and sewing supplies 

Wire and wire cables 

Wire, covered and coated 

Woven products and fabrics 

Steel, structural 

Lock machinery and parts 

Dry-dock parts" (not otherwise specified). 

Obsolete material '. 

Magnetos, carburetors, and parts 

Lumber, native '. 

Concrete blocks for breakwater repairs. . . 

Fuel, liiesel oil '. 

Obsolete material 

Obsolete equipment 

Marine hardware 



Total, quartermaster's stores 

Miscellaneous district quartermaster's stores. 

Fuel-oil store ' '. '. 

Medical store .• 

Stationery store 

Panama Canal Press 



Total. 



$6,533.43 

12,149.13 

142,819.08 

39,171.50 

36.70 

5, 234. 60 

377. 13 

53,162.00 

16,570.18 

13,491.57 

757. 56 

2, 638. .32 

4, 192. 03 



71,195.79 

253,427.90 

9, 524. 13 

78,246.54 

352. 85 

7, 820. 50 

928. 36 

1,489.70 

8,145.81 

529. 29 

15,873.43 

1 329. 94 

14,920.16 

1,497.65 

33.37 

426. 65 

27,395.70 

2, 970. 39 

1,022.07 

'331.93 

10,186.41 

76,572.27 

28,413.27 

21,661.53 

1,424.86 

83,821.64 

6,290.94 

86, 565. 88 

33,824.84 

118.13 

1,385.81 

142,106.41 

167,998.67 

68,024.60 

3,267.62 

1,718.73 



36, 049. 69 



19,218.32 

40,498.34 

2,203.95 

3,366.20 



5,741,090.-38 

13,713.54 

285, 744. 32 

153,234.82 

21,301.09 

97, 700. 58 



6,312,784.73 



S9,764.31 

4, 339. 55 

118,748.27 

45,475.35 



8, 515. 22 



59,253.13 
15,656.25 

9,665.99' 
639. 52 

8,537.19 
26, 535. 37 



64,825.56 
122, 789. 44 

9,516.30 
72, 604. 39 

1,715.47 
26, 648. 05 

1,207.84 

1,615.55 
45,287.33 
611.15 
12,8.50.53 
14,915.13 
19,828.75 

1,608.35 

33.37 

386. 15 

28, 892. 00 

3,848.86 

2,067.61 
1 63. 50 

6,757.36 
72,960.29 
30,139.11 
22,241.37 

2,473.14 
88,943.54 

7,255.64 

92,979.15 

10,124.63 

118.13 

2, 873. .52 

106,757.42 

153,419.68 

58,891.86 

123,428.23 

1,718.73 

273. 30 

69,470.71 

4,458.51 

20, 255. 48 

40,498.34 

5,875.86 

2^498. 39 

2,450.00 

39, 650. 19 



5,354,786.34 
10,681.05 
25,959.10 

131,021.15 
22,472.85 

109,605.55 



5,654,526.0! 



'Indicates credit balances caused by credit to storehouses for issues of these articles, the charges for 
which were not received until after closing of books for the current fiscal year. 



228 



THE PANAMA CANAL.. 



Table No. 58. — Supply department, commissary branch, cost of material and supplits 
purchased and sold during the year ended June SO, 1920. 



Class. 



On hand 
June 30, 1919. 



Purchases. 



On hand 
June 30, 1920. 



Sold. 



Groceries 

Hardware 

Dry goods 

Boots and shoes 

Cold storage 

Tobacco , 

Raw material... 

Total 



$572, 132. 48 
161,110.59 
901,634.71 
255,296.87 
186,251.83 
66,361.51 
625,957.60 



12,838,233.80 

339,836.51 

1,575,331.94 

436,227.53 

1,854,227.62 

337,959.87 

12,809,165.87 



1597,464.26 
139, 747. 80 
982, 720. 41 
318,960.85 
152,461.37 
38, 752. 85 
408,608.18 



S2,812,902.02 
361,199.30 

1,494,246.24 
372,563.55 

1,888,018.08 
365,568.53 

3,026,515.29 



2,768,745.59 



10,190,983.14 2,638,715.72 



10,321,013.01 



I Cattle, hogs, and poultry in amount of $2,044,035.16. 
PERCENTAGE OF SURCHARGE EARNED ON COST. 



Class. 


Sold. 


Earned 
surcharge. 


Percentage 

earned on 

cost. 


Groceries 


$2,812,902.02 
361,199.30 

1,494,246.24 
372,563.55 

1,888,018.08 
365,568.53 

3,026,515.29 


$381,983.57 
102,251.08 
494,663.94 
101,563.25 
479, 817. 49 
204,391.47 
34,823.76 


13.58 


Hardware 


28.31 


Dry goods 


33.10 


Boots and shoes 


27.26 


Cold storage 


25.41 


Tobacco 


55.91 


Raw material 


1.15 






Total 


10,321,013.01 


1,799,494.56 


17.43 







United States. 
Foreign . 



LOCATION OF PURCHASES. 



Costa Rica 

Haiti 

Central and South America and West Indies 

Cattle industry 2, 

Local purchases 

Panama Canal 



605,167.59 
312,077.03 

92, 295. 43 
1,232.14 

96,596.54 
182,118.63 
787,663.32 
113,832.46 



Total 10,190,983.14 

CLASSIFICATION BY COMMODITIES. 

Groceries 52, 838, 233. 80 

Hardware 339,836.51 

Dry goods 1,575,331.94 

Boots and shoes 436, 227. 53 

Cold storage 1,854,227.62 

Tobacco 337,959.87 

Raw material 2,809,165.87 

Total 10,190,983.14 

Table No. 59. — Supply department, commissary branch, statement showing distribution 
of sales and selling value for the year ended June SO, 1920. 





1919 


1920 


Increase. 




$2,395,162.73 

1,458,762.36 

838,931.79 

480, 223. 34 

205, 751. 93 

5,858,814.18 


$2,161,118.46 

1,558,588.17 

1,119,852.93 

411,480.95 

272,866.75 

6,883,513.80 


$234,044.27 


Panama Canal.. 


99,825.81 




280,921.14 




68.742.39 




67, 114. 82 




1,024,699.62 








11,237,646.33 


12,407,421.06 


1,161,774.73 






Supplied fOT equipment: 


173,561.79 

1,205.55 

88,514.78 


181,849.04 

1,023.09 

131,108.20 


8,287.25 


General expense . . 


182.46 


Plants for expense 


42,593.42 






Total. 


263,282.12 


313,980.33 


50,698.21 








118,817.40 
66,973.39 


166,282.50 
63,544.59 


47,465.10 




3,428.80 






Total. 


185,790.79 


229, 827. 09 


44,036.30 






Grand total 


11,686,719.24 


12,951,228.48 


1,264,509.24 







APPENDIX F. 

REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY, EXECUTIVE 
DEPARTMENT. 

Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, August 8, 1920. 
Sir: The report of this department for the fiscal year contains, 
in addition to an outline of the work of the various divisions and 
bureaus, statements of the working force; studies of increase in living 
costs; a summary of wage adjustments; reports of the courts, which 
are included in the executive department for administrative purposes 
only; and references to other matters in which this department acts 
in behalf of the whole organization. 

Population of the Canal Zone. 

An enumeration of the population of the Canal Zone was made 
in January, 1920, in accordance with instructions from the Bureau 
of the Census. The results were published in The Panama Canal 
Record of April 28, 1920. It has been the practice to have an enumer- 
ation made each June by the division of police. This is less elaborate 
as to classification than the decennial census; but it is accurate, and 
inasmuch as it is made each year (thus giving an annual check on 
the constantly changing population) it is used as the basis for the 
vital statistics of the Canal Zone. The summary of the police 
census was published in The Panama Canal Record of July 28, 
1920. It shows the following: 





Americans. 


All others. 


Americans. 1 All others. 






Men. 


Em- 
ploy- 
ees. 


Men. 


Em- 
ploy- 
ees. 


Wom- 
en. 


Em- 
ploy- 
ees. 


Chil- 
dren. 


Wom- 
en. 


Em- 
ploy- 
ees. 


Chil- 
dren. 


Total. 




k"4i6' 

|i,'i.38" 


2,305 
'"i,'i28' 

i' 


".3,'ii5 

.3,' 196" 
'"127' 


2,577 
"3,'656 

"ig 


'i,"853" 
'"'55.3' 


315 

"'"'.54' 








60 
'""14" 


"2,' 432" 
'i,'536 


5, 237 


Balboa district 


1,924 


1,770 


13,504 
4,252 


Cristobal district 


612 1 966 


7,995 
20 


Prisoners 






1 






151 


















Total employees 
Total persons... 


3,'572' 


13,4.34 


'6,'4.38' 


5,652 


2," 406 


369 




74 


'3,'962' 


19,529 
21,650 


2,536 1 2,736 



1 Includes 63 American civilian employees of the United States Army and Na-^-y. 

Working Force. 

The working force varied between 20,375 and 22,529 during the 
year. Table No. 1 shows the number actually at work at the close of 
the year, the date of enumeration being June 23, 1920. Table No. 
2 shows the variation from month to month. Table No. 3 gives a 
comparison with previous years. 

229 



230 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



While the forcejchanged but little in numbers, the turnover of 
personnel was, as usual, great. No figures are available for the 
labor force of West Indians (known as silver roll force) ; but it is 
known that emigi-ation to Cuba and the United States increased 
greatly. Immigration was also active, and there was available at 
all times on the Isthmus a larger labor force than the Canal and 
railroad could absorb. Wages paid by the Canal are somewhat 
higher, and living costs are generally lower on the Isthmus than in 
the industrial centers of the West Indies and the Caribbean coast. 

The turnover in force of Americans, represented by new employ- 
ments and separations from the service, was approximately 30 per 
cent, due to American employees having resigned to return to the 
United States. In general, however, the cost of living on the Canal 
Zone is less than in the United States, due to such perquisites as 
free c[uarters, medical care, and vacation with pay, which form 
part of the^contract necessary to attract American men to this 
service. 

Table No. 1.— Force actually at ivorh on June 23, 1920. 





Monthly. 


Silver employees' wages specified 


in United States currency. 




Artisans. 


Laborers. 




Spe- 
cial. 


31 
cents. 


29 
cents. 


26 
cents. 


24 

cents. 


27 
cents. 


25 
cents. 


24 
cents. 


23 
cents. 


22 
cents. 


21 

cents. 


Operation and mainte- 
nance: 
Office 


42 
99 
73 

300 
503 
843 
135 
431 
50 


1 

1 






















Building division.. 


15 
2 

44 


283 
15 

69 

4 

20 

55 


315 

17 

80 

6 

28 

219 


333 
105 

95 
11 
33 

457 










323 
52 

140 

18 

117 

569 


179 


Electrical division. . 










24 


Municipal engi- 




1 






421 


Lock operation 

Dredging division.. 






50 








1 






77 


Mechanical division 


13 

58 

3 


31 






234 


Marine division 












Fortifications 


26 


31 


29 


24 










37 


73 












Total 


2,476 


76 


118 


477 


694 


1,058 




2 






1,256 


1,058 










Supply department: 

Quartermaster .' 

Subsistence 


848 

388 

1,104 

263 
100 
10 
464 
238 

133 

182 

126 

387 




52 


103 
2 

18 

5 
1 


71 

"'ie' 

6 
2 


115 

1 

15 

7 






2 




80 


615 








Commissarv 

Ca^^le industry- 
plantations 

Hotel Washington. 
Accounting department 

Health department 

Executive department . 
Panama Railroad: 

Superintendent 

Transportation 

Ueceiving and for- 
warding agent 

Coaling stations 


1 

483 


2 




7 


12 


5 


5 


67 
39 
































29 


3 


6 
3 

24 


5 
2 

8 


7 
2 

28 










19 


300 










3 




4 


6 


1 






5 


355 






99 
15 


49 
52 


"""21' 


73 
20 






486 


1,114 








23 


641 






4 












Total 


4,243 


627 


162 


183 


203 


198 


647 


494 


1,128 


5 


109 


1,383 






Grand total 


6,719 


703 


280 


660 


897 


1,256 


647 


496 


1,128 


5 


1,365 


2,441 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 231 

Table No. 1 — Force actually at work on June 23, ^9f (9— Continued. 





Silver employees' wages specified in United States 
currency. 


Total. 






Laborers. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


Grand 
total. 




19 
cents. 


17 
cents. 


16 

cents. 


15 

cents. 


14 

cents. 


13 

cents. 


12 

cents. 


11 
cents. 


Task. 




Operation and mainte- 
nance: 
Oflice 




















43 
1,554 

288 

1,169 

592 

1,120 

1,720 

489 

277 


39 
519 
248 

113 
169 
191 

988 
ISl 
55 


82 














2 




3 


1 


2,073 


Electrical division 












536 


Municipal engi- 












6 




13 




1,282 


Lock operation 














761 
















i 

5 




1,311 














2 




2,708 


Marine division . . . 












670 


Fortifications 


4 
















332 



















Total 


4 










10 


22 


1 


7,252 


2,503 


9,755 














Supply department: 
Quartermaster . 












1 


5 


2 


1,894 

391 

1,605 

803 

103 

10 

837 

248 

578 
182 

1,947 
1,173 


216 
36 
313 

28 

10 

250 

245 

567 

74 
148 

98 
120 


2,110 


Subsistence '. 












427 


Commissary 

Catjtle industry- 


4 


4 


22 


53 


99 


15 


72 


69 


15 


1,918 
831 


Hotel Washington . 














1 




113 


Accounting department 
Health department 














1 




260 










2 


2 






1,082 


Executive department . 














815 


Panania Railroad: 

Superintendent 












6 


8 




652 


Transportation'. 












330 


Receiving and for- 
warding agent... 














i 




2,045 


Coaling stations 












10 


I 




1,293 














1 






Total 


4 


4 


22 


53 


101 


34 


72 


82 


17 


9,771 


2,105 


11,876 






Grand total 


8 


4 


22 


53 


101 


44 


72 


104 


18 


17,023 


4,608 


21,631 



Table No. 2. — Force reports, by months, fiscal year 1919-20. 



Year and month. 



The Panama 
Canal. 



Gold. 



Silver. 



Panama R.R.Co. 



Gold. 



Silver. 



Grand 
total. 



1919 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



3,076 
3,560 
3,639 
3,697 
3,704 
3,707 



3,753 
3,863 
4,105 
4,189 
4,196 
4,165 



14,729 
14,645 
14,590 
14,080 
13,501 
14,405 



14,697 
14, 593 
13,288 
13,871 
13,6;50 
13,272 



362 
396 
392 
351 
343 
360 



375 
381 

425 
448 
435 
437 



3,209 
3,497 
3,646 
2,247 
3,032 
3,586 



3,573 
3,041 
3,892 
4,021 
3,472 
3,709 



21,376 
22,098 
22,267 
20, 375 
20,580 
22,058 



22,398 
21,878 
21,710 
22,529 
21,733 
21,583 



232 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 3.— High and low force records, December, 1906, to June SO, 1920, by fiscal 

years. 



December 


190C. 




October 


1907. 




January 


April 


1908. 




November 


October 


1909. 




January 


March 


1910. 




December 


December 


1911. 




June 


January 


1912. 




August 


August 


1913. 




December 


January 


1914. 




June 


July 


1915. 




February . 


July 


1916. 




September 


January 


1917. 




June 


July 


1918. 




Juiie 


February 


1919. 


-■ 


September 1 


April 


1920. 




October 



The Panama Canal. 



Gold. 



3,881 



4,992 
4,033 



4,950 
4,161 



4, 376 
4,295 



4,553 
4,705 



4,420 
4,292 



4,332 
4,122 



4, 087 
3,744 



3, 944 
3,790 



4,198 
3,088 



3, 208 
3,129 



3,552 
3,229 



3,186 
2,763 



.3,032 
2,639 



4,189 
3,697 



Silver. 



15,604 



20,836 
16,987 



21, 168 
19,803 



23,411 
20, 583 

26,284 
24,383 



25,4.39 
21, 795 



25,818 
24,860 



30,918 
23, 209 



23,824 
21,499 



22,846 
17,023 



17,982 
17, 160 



17,989 
16,381 



17, 152 
12, 798 



14,660 
12,812 



13,871 
14, 080 



Total. 



19,485 



25, 828 
21,020 



26,118 
23,964 



27, 787 
24, 878 



30, 837 
29, 098 



29,859 
26, 087 



30,150 
28,982 



35, 005 
26,953 



27, 768 
25,289 



27,044 
20,111 



21, 190 

20,289 



21,541 
19,610 



21,338 
15,561 



17,692 
15,451 



18,060 
17, 777 



Panama 
R. R., 

gold and 
silver. 



4,416 



6, 139 
4,796 



7,052 
5,863 



7,618 
6,393 



7,829 
6,044 



7,967 
6,603 



8,024 
5,855 



4,957 
5,195 



5,502 
4,343 



5, .314 

2,978 



5,349 
2,447 



4,453 
3,368 



4,645 
3,067 



4,200 
3, 056 



4, 469 
2,598 



Total 

Panama 
Canal 
and 

Panama 
R. R. 



23,901 



31,967 
25,816 



33,170 
29, S27 



35,495 
31, 271 



38,676 
35,142 



37, 826 
32,690 



38, 174 
34,837 



39,962 
32, 148 



33, 270 
29,632 



32,358 
23,089 



26,539 
22, 736 



25,994 
22,978 



24,983 
18,628 



21, 892 
18,507 



22,529 
20,375 



Note— Figures do not include contractor's forces. 
force ever reported was 44,733 on Mar. 26, 1913. 



If taken into consideration, the greatest working 



Living Costs. 



Various studios were made during the year to determine how 
groat had been the advance in the cost of living since 1914. The 
most exhaustive of these applied expressly to the West Indian, or 
labor force, but as an index of price changes this holds good, also, 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 233 

for the whole communitv. It was found that the percentage increase 
in four groups from July 1, 1914, to July 1, 1920, was as follows: 

Food 101.11 Household 105.30 

Clothing 71.59 Personal 65.47 

Weights assigned to these percentages indicated a gross increase 
of 87.39 per cent in the case of West Indian employees; and this 
would not vary greatly for American employees on the basis of 
"necessities" only. 

Complaints of American Employees, 

As a result of a number of conferences with committees of the 
organized American emplovees, it was decided before the close of 
the year to constitute a grievance board to advise the Governor on 
complaints of American employees. Although the decision was 
made during the fiscal year 1920, it was not actually put in force 
until July 13, 1920, when the Governor made the following announce- 
ment: 

1. A board is hereby appointed to make investigations and appropriate recommen- 
dations to the Governor in the matter of such complaints of employees concerning 
working conditions as may be from time to time referred to it. The board will 
be composed of the engineer of maintenance, two employees as representatives of 
organized labor, viz., Messrs. W. C. Hushing and Harvey McConaughey, and, in each 
case, the head of the department or division in whose jurisdiction the complaint 
originates. 

2. The functions of the board are wholly advisory, and its findings and recommen- 
dations will not be effective until approved by the Governor. 

3. Complaints against administrative policies of the Canal and Panama Raikoad 
will not, in general, be referred to the board ; but the Governor may require the board 
to make recommendations to him on any matter involving the general welfare of 
employees. 

4. The following procedure will be followed preliminary to the reference of com- 
plaints to the board: An individual employee or a group of employees belonging to 
a labor organization affiliated with the American Federation of Labor will present 
the complaint to the proper local union or shop committee, who will endeavor to 
adjust the matter with the immediate superiors of the employee or employees con- 
cerned, including division or department heads. Unless adjusted, this complaint 
will then be submitted to the Panama Metal Trades Council or Central Labor Lnion, 
as the case may requii'e, in complete form, and if the proper officers or committees 
of these bodies can not arrange satisfactory settlement, the case will be forwarded by 
them to the Governor, with request for reference to the board. Cases which from 
their nature require immediate action may be submitted to the Governor by the 
President and Secretary of the Metal Trades Council or Central Labor Union, with 
the facts and reasons clearly stated. The complaint may then be referred to the 
board by the Governor, if practicable. 

5. The board is authorized to formulate its methods of procedure. 

6. It will be noted that the board is to act on the complaints of members of labor 
organizations affiliated Avith the American Federation of Labor only. The right of all 
employees, individually or collectively, whether members of a labor organization or 
not, to make complaint to the Governor, will be continued. 

7. The bureau of statistics will keep a record of all meetings and proceedings of the 
board. 

8. Additional instructions will l)e Issued from time to time as may be necessary. 

Compensation of American Employees. 

The wages of ^Vmerican employees are fixed with relation to tliose 
of similar classes of workers in the United States; and each of the 
many changes experienced there has been reflected here in some 
degree. In the United States the problems of employment affect 



234 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

mMuy more poo])le than here; but they are spread over larger territory 
and are handh^l by many agencies. In the Canal Zone the Govern- 
ment is the only employer. Its employment problems embrace the 
features of government, transportation, manufacture, and distribu- 
tion. It must deal with all of these in such a way as to maintain a 
pro])er relationship between industrial conditions of the Canal and the 
United States, and also among the various classes or units of the Canal 
organization. The problem of coordination between like classes of 
workers here and in the United States is complex according as con- 
ditions of employment A'ary in the States and on the Isthmus ; but the 
additional prol)iem of maintaining a proper balance among the va- 
rious unrelated classes in the Canal organization is always complicated 
and difficult. For instance, what relation should there be in the com- 
pensation of machinists, doctors, clerks,, and bakers? 

Heads of departments and diA^isions find such problems as these 
occupying a large amount of time. To assist in a proper administra- 
tive handling of questions bearing on the compensation of clerks, and 
related classes, the Governor has referred such cases to a committee 
composed of the executive secretary, the auditor, and the chief quarter- 
master. This committee has acted on scores of cases, and it is be- 
lieved has succeeded in keeping a proper balance in the rates of pay 
of employees in administrative work. Such matters as can not be 
settled by heads of departments and divisions, or by committees of 
these officials, have been referred to the wage board. 

The wage board continued to function in accordance with the rules 
laid down in the circular letter of March 31, 1919, which was quoted 
in full in my annual report for 1919. The work of the board is referred 
to here because the statistical and clerical service necessary for its 
functioning have been rendered by this department. The equiva- 
lent of the time of two employees has been devoted exclusively to this 
work. The board has been composed of the engineer of maintenance, 
Col. Jay J. Morrow, representing the administration, and Mr. W. C. 
Hushing, chosen by the central body of the various labor organizations, 
to represent the employees. Of the many cases considered, the fol- 
lowing few are instanced, as revealing the variety of classes affected; 
and the character of determination reached by the board or by the 
Governor after the board had made reports to him. 

Building trades. — Rates paid on "cost-plus" contracts under the 
construction division of the Army in the United States were used as 
bases for adjustment of rates of bricklayers, carpenters, painters, 
plasterers, plumbers, metal lathers, and tile setters in the Canal service 
most of whom were employed in the construction of concrete ])uildings 
at the new Army posts at Miraflores and Gatun. On account of the 
constant advance of these rates in the United States, an adjustment 
was made every two months on the Isthmus, beginning August 1,1919. 

Metal and shop trades. — On June 8, 1920, the Navy Department 
announced that the compensation of employees in the navy yards 
would be increased July 1, 1920, by$240 a year, theso-called "bonus." 
The ])ay of all Americans on the Isthmus doing work similar to that 
of navy yards, and of employees drawn from the shoj^s trades is based 
on rates paid in the navy yards. An adjustment of the rates of 
these employees, numl)ering"f ully one-third of the force, was in progress 
at the close of tlie fiscal year. Fifty distinct occupations or crafts are 
affected l)y this one adjustment. 



REPOET OF EXECUTIVE SECEETARY. 235 

Municipal engineering foreman. — These rates were adjusted on the 
basis of a differential of 5 and 10 cents less an hour than the average 
of rates for foremen of carpenters, masons, and plumbers, and lead- 
ingmen of pipe fitters and ironworkers; all of which classes of work 
are supervised to some extent by these foremen. 

Chauffeurs. — An adjustment was made on the basis of an average 
of rates paid by the American Kailway Express Co., Post Office 
Department, Motor Transport Corps, and Rock Island Arsenal, 
because the work on the Canal Zone includes some of each of these 
classes. 

Balceri/ foremen. — These rates were adjusted with relation to rates 
in 26 bakeries in the United States in 19 cities and 14 different States, 
from which comparable data were received, consideration being given 
to conditions of employment as well as rates. 

Pilots. — The rates for this class were based on pay of pilots at Cape 
Cod Canal while that waterway was being operated by the Govern- 
ment. 

Railroad positions. — The decisions regarding wages of employees 
on the railroads of the United States are necessarily complex, because 
the service is complex. To apply these rates to conditions on the 
Isthmus adds other complications. Yet this must be done. The 
rates for transportation and car-shop employees are determined on 
this basis. During the year the schedules for hostlers and car-shop 
employees were adjusted on the basis of changes in the United 
States. At the close of the year an announcement of a further, and 
general, adjustment in the United States, effective May 1, 1920, was 
made and this will be the basis for further adjustment on the Isthmus. 

Construction and, engineering foremen. — This term covers a large 
class on the Isthmus, including foremen who are not actually engaged 
in construction work but are coordinated with this class. The scale 
of rates was determined with reference to wages paid by the Engineer 
Department, United States Army; the Reclamation Service; Light- 
house Service; and the District of Columbia. 

Stevedore foremen. — The rates for this class were made with relation 
to the rates fixed by the National Adjustment Commission for long- 
shore service at North Atlantic ports, due regard being paid to proper 
coordination on the Isthmus. A readjustment following changes in 
the United States was in progress at the close of the year. 

Other cases. — Among other cases considered were the following: 

References of cases appealed to the Secretary of War and sent by 
his request to the wage board, plumbers, carpenters, heavy forgers. 

Application of bonus of !'i;240 to certain administrative positions 
and proper coordination of such positions with similar ones in the 
United States. 

New rates for nurses on account of 20 per cent increase in the rates 
for Army nurses. 

Apprentices of mechanical trades, blacksmiths, bureau chiefs, 
butchers, cement finishers, chauffeurs, chemists, clerks of various 
classes, cold storage plant employees, cost accountant, cremator and 
em})almer, customs inspector, dispensary assistant, dredgemen, 
electricians, entomologist, filter operator, fire truck operator, floating 
crane officers, foremen of various classes, inspector of hulls and boilers, 
inspector of motor cars, instructor of apprentices, laundrymen, mill- 
men, marine draftsmen, marine officers, patternmakers, pharmacists, 



236 THE PANAMA CANAl.. 

physicians and surgeons, planners, pontoon bridge operators, postofTice 
positions, poultry experts, pumpman, quarantine custodians and 
inspectors, restaurant managers, sanitation inspectors, school teachers, 
station engineers, superintendent of leper asylum, technician, tele- 
phone inspector, weighmaster. 

Compensation of West Indian Employees. 

In continuance of the policy of adjusting the wages of West Indian 
employees at such times as changes in the cost of living seem to 
justify this course, two increases were made during the fiscal year, 
and a third was authorized, effective July 1, 1920. In these adjust- 
ments the rates effective in 1914 are taken as the ])ase, and the mini- 
mum rates and earnings are given primar}^ consideration, since it is on 
the lowest paid classes of workers that the burdens of increases in 
living costs are heaviest. Tlie following statement shows the general 
trend of wages for the common labor class since 1914: 

Common laborers' rates. 

Cents an hour. 

May 1, 1914 10 

Jan. 1,1917 12 

Oct. 1, 1917 13 and 14 

May 1, 1918 15 

Nov. 1, 1918 17 

July 1, 1919 ." 19 

Feb. 1, 1920 21 

July 1, 1920 (new fiscal year) 23 

In 1914 the men worked 9 hours a day and their earnings were 
therefore, 90 cents: since that time all of the force has been placed 
on the eight-hour basis, so that in determining tlie present rates the 
daily earnings are compared rather than the hourly. 

In December, 1919, a committee representing an organization of 
the West Indian employees called on the Governor and stated that the 
wages paid at that time were not sufficient to maintain the employees 
at that standard of reasonable decency and comfort which he had 
recognized as incumbent upon the Government and the Panama 
Railroad Company to insure. The Governor referred the matter to 
a board composed of the heads of departments and divisions, which 
has acted on such questions for years past. Meanwhile he directed 
that a special inquiry be made by the labor inspector, and that data 
of bring costs ])e })rouglit up to January 1, 1920. 

The board mot on January 2, 1920, and considered the report of the 
labor inspector and such data as were available on living costs. On 
Janiniry 9, the board heard a committee of West Indian employees 
and stenographic notes were taken of the salient parts of the testimony. 
The committee was asked to submit data in support of the clairrs 
made by it, and also was asked to meet with the chief quartermaster to 
discuss features of a lease for land and quarters at Las (^'ascadas, where 
The Panama Canal is endeavoring to establish an agricultural colony 
of West Indians to be used as a reservoir to supply laborers for inter- 
mittent or casual work. No data were submitted, the committee 
stating that those in the hands of the Canal authorities were sufficient. 
The committee did not avail itself of the opportunity to meet with the 
chief quartermaster to discuss the terms of the leases. 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 237 

On the basis of the information in its possession the board recom- 
mended to the Governor on January 24, and the Governor. approved, 
the following advances: Hourly rates, 2 cents; monthly rates, S5; 
per diem, 15 cents. 

Tlie Governor also directed the board to meet thenceforth on the 
15th of the last month of each quarter for the purpose of determining 
whether changes in living costs during that quarter were such as to 
indicate changes (either advances or reductions) in rates of pay. The 
board, in turn, directed that a method of figuring living costs and 
changes therein be adopted on the basis of actual purchases by West 
Indian employees at the commissaries for a period of three months. 
Such a study was made and the results of this form the basis on wliich 
rates are now determined. It is pertinent that the new and more 
elaborate studies confirm the conclusions formerly reached, when a 
few leading articles of food and clothing were used as indices of changes 
in prices. 

On the basis of changes in living costs no adjustment was found 
necessary as of April 1 ; but an adjustment for July 1 was recom- 
mended by the board at its meeting in June. This adjustment is an 
advance of 2 cents on hourly rates, $2.50 on monthly rates, and 10 
cents on per diem rates. 

Strike of West Indian Employees. 

At the time it was found that an increase of 2 cents an hour in 
rates of pay should be given on February 1, 1920, the organization 
of West Indian employees had demanded an increase of 7 cents an 
hour, and certain other changes in conditions of employment. The 
refusal to grant these demands was met with a strike on February 
24, when approximately 15,000 to 17,000 quit work. 

The employees had been incited to this action by some white men 
from the United States who organized them, took their money, and 
then deserted them. Such men know nothing about conditions in 
the Tropics, are not familiar with standards of living in the countries 
bordering the Caribbean, and entirely ignore the fact that wages are 
higher at The Panama Canal and prices of necessities lower than in 
any of the cities of the Caribbean coast and islands. There are two 
distinct classes of workers in the Canal force — American citizens, who 
live according to the standards of their home communities, and West 
Indian negroes, whose standards of living, although higher, are fairly 
comparable with those of their home communities. The wages of 
each class are representative of a liberal allowance for maintainilig 
its accustomed standards. 

Realizing that the mass of these men had been misled and misin- 
formed, the Governor announced that all who were not back at work 
on February 26 would be considered as having voluntarily left the 
service without due notice. Rules of long standing provide that in 
such cases reemployment may be only at a lower rate of pay than 
that received at the time of quitting. Meanwhile steps were^ taken 
to clear the Canal quarters of persons not employed, and to fill the 
places of the men who had quit work. On March 2 the strike 
leaders officially ad^'ised the men to return to work; and a few days 
later the force was at its normal strength. 



238 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Except for about 2,000 West Indians and native laborers who 
remained loyal to the work, the strike of silver-roll employees was 
complete. Thanks to the readiness of the American employees to 
turn to whatever work was given them to do, it was possible to keep 
the Canal in o])eration, to feed and provide^, the force with water and 
light. 

Shortly after the strike a request was made to the British Govern- 
ment by some of the West Indian employees for an investigation. 
Such an investigation was conducted with the full consent of the 
United States Government. The Panama Canal placed at the dis- 
posal of the special agent of the British Government all of the facts 
in its possession, and in every \\'ay facilitated the inquiry. The re- 
port had not been made public at the close of the fiscal year. 

Employees and the Land. 

The concentration of Canal work at the two termini, the difficulty 
of moving large numbers of men by railroad ea"h morning and 
evening from interior points to the termini, and the policy of depopu- 
lating the Canal Zone based upon sanitary and military considera- 
tions, have resulted in taking the West Indians from the small farm 
and hamlet conditions which existed during the construction of the 
Canal and crowding them into the cities of Panama and Colon. This 
condition was called to the attention of the Congress in 1917 with a 
request for funds to construct quarters for the employees in the Canal 
Zone; but so far no appropriation has been made for this purpose. 
The result is that between ten and fifteen thousand men and their 
families, a'-customed to country life and to raising a part at least of 
their food, are unable to assist themselves by gardening, and at the same 
time feel forced to adopt the city standards of dress and entertain- 
ment. The board on rates of pay for silver employees recommended 
to the Governor that steps be taken to en<"ourage gardening on the 
part of those employees who live near unfenced lands in the Canal 
Zone; and this has been done. In addition, the project for estab- 
lishing a reservoir of laborers at Las Cascades in the old buildings 
of the depoi)ulated village, and allotting to the tenants plots of land 
adja"ent for gardens, has been worked out. So far, however, the 
West Indians seem reluctant to avail themselves of the opportunity 
offered. 

Publicity. 

During the year more effort has been devoted to advertising the 
Canal and the facilities at its termini for meeting the needs of 
ships. Authority was secured from the Secretary of War to expend 
not more than $75,000 in the placing of advertisements in represent- 
ative shii)]>ing and comnKU-cial i)a]iers in lilurope and Japan. Ac- 
tion was deferred, by direction of the Governor, on account of the 
coal shortage, but beginning in November a quarter-page advertise- 
ment has been placed in the London Times Trade Supplement and 
6-inch advertisements (3 inches deep by 2 columns wide) in each 
of the following: Lloyd's List, and Fairplay in England; Courant, 
Holland; Lloyd Anvorsois, Belgium; Lloyd Francais, France; Mer- 
cantile and vShi]) Gazette, Norway; Diario del Comercio, S])ain; and 
B0rsen, Denmark, at a total annual cost of $18,990.61. The form 



REPOET OF EXECUTIVE SEOKETARY. 239 

of the advertisements is being changed approximately once a month; 
a series of advertisements is now running, featm*ing, successively, the 
various facilities for shipping. 

Material has been furnished to shipping magazines, commercial 
papers, and the general press for articles on features of the Canal and 
the traffic through it and at its termini. Most of this has been in 
the form of completed arti'^les, with photographic illustrations, 
though in other cases material has been furnished for the comjnlation 
of arti''les either in re3])onso to requests or voluntarily offered to 
magazines. Cable dispatches to news-gathoring organizations on 
events of particular interest have been sent regularly. 

A folder containing con' ise descriptive, statistical, and historical 
information about the Canal, with a relief map, was published in an 
edition of 10,000 for general distribution. A folder devoted to the 
Canal in its relation to the foreign trade of the United States was pub- 
lished in an edition of 5,000 for distribution at the Seventh Annual 
Foreign Trade Convention. Preparation of a new OfTicial Handbook 
was completed and it will be published on the arrival of the photoen- 
gravings from the United States. A folder entitled ' 'Panama, a Place 
to Visit," has been published in an edition of 5,000, under the direc- 
tion of the tourist committee, and given general distribution, prin- 
cipally through travel bureaus. 

The tourist committee was established primarily as a means of 
publicity, with the idea of availing of the word-of-mouth commen- 
dations which are gi\^en and the articles written by those who have 
visited the Canal. Its ])urpose is to encourage visitors and to see that 
they are cared for comfortably while on the Isthmus and given facili- 
ties for seeing the Canal and its appurtenam-es. Its personnel con- 
sists of the master of transportation of the Panama Railroad, the 
manager of the Washington Hotel, the manager and assistant man- 
ager of the Tivoli Hotel, and the publicity man of the Canal. The 
committee has engaged activeh" in its task and is securing good 
results. 

Direct mail advertising forms a considerable part of the publicity. 
The Panama Canal Rc'ord, the Sailing Directions, the Tariffs, and 
all circulars and notices affecting marine interests are mailed to ship- 
ping interests all over the world, through this and the Wasliington 
office, and espcial attention is paid in this office to furnishing in- 
formation to the managing olTicos of newly established comiianies 
whicli may make use of the Canal. The answering of all but routine 
inc[uiries about ship]iing and traffic is handled as a part of the pub- 
licity service. 

The Panama Canal Record has been continued as the weekly 
official bulletin of '^Fhe Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad, 
publishing all of the circulars with general bearing issued by both, 
the monthly reports of the Governor, and a variety of news and 
statistical articles bearing on the operation of the Canal and its ad- 
juncts. Free distribution is made to steamshi]) and commercial 
interests, public libraries, the em])loyees of the Canal and railroad on 
the gold roll, consular officials all over the world, and other govern- 
mental interests on the Isthmus and in the United States. Distri- 
bution on and from the Isthmus has been about 5,500 copies a week; 
distribution through the Washington office, about 2,400 copies, with 
100 extra copies of numbers containing special articles for which there 



240 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



is likely to be demand ; and 350 copies are reserved for binding in the 
permanent volumes. The subsori];)tion rate to private interests has 
been continued at SI a year for those reached under domestic postal 
rates, and SI. 50 for those for whom foreign postage is paid. Re- 
ceipts from subscriptions and sales during the fiscal year amounted 
to S205.1S. 

Organization of Executive Department. 

The organization of the department has remained unchanged 
during the year, although there have been many changes in personnel. 
The gold roll force compared with the two previous years was: 



June 30, 
1918. 



Jvme 30, 
1919. 



June 30, 
1920. 



General 

Record bureau 

Personal bureau 

Bureau of pay rolls 

Correspondence bureau 

Property and reciuisition bureau. 

Biu-eau "of statistics 

Bureau of clubs and playgrounds 

Total 

Division of civil affairs .'. . . 

Division of police and fire 

Division of schools 

O ffice of special attorney 

Courts 

Joint commission 

Total 



539 



547 



164 


181 


213 


113 


96 


81 


174 


174 


182 


65 


72 


78 


5 


5 


5 


14 


14 


14 


4 


5 







573 



THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE. 



The work of the executive office was continued under direction 
the chief clerk, Mr. J. IT. Smith, with a total gold roll as shown above. 
A summary of the work done by the various bureaus follows: 



BUREAU OF CLUBS AND PLAYGROUNDS. 

Clubhouses were operated for gold employees at Balboa, Ancon, 
Pedro Miguel, Gatun, and Cristobal ; also a boat house at Fort Amador. 
Clubhouses for silver employees were operated at La Boca, Red Tank, 
Paraiso, Gatun, and Cristobal. Playgrounds were operated at Bal- 
boa, Ancon, Pedro Miguel, Gatun, Cristobal, and Colon Beach for the 
children of gold employees. 

During the year changes were made on the buildings at Balboa 
and Cristobal. The reading room at the Balboa clubhouse was 
enlarged, the side walls of the building removed, book cases installed 
in the library, a librarian put in charge of the reading room and 
library. With the completion of these changes, the main floor^ of 
the Balboa clubhouse has been made considerably more attractive 
and useful. 

The main floor of the Cristobal clubhouse has been enlarged, the 
side walls of the building removed, the billiards and bowling located 
close together. The entertainment hall on the second floor has been 
removed from one end of the building to the other, making the enter- 



REPORT OP EXECUTIVE SECEETARY. 241 

tainment hall more comfortable on account of the prevailing breezes 
being from this end of the building. 

New equipment has been received in the various gold clubhouses, 
consisting of phonographs, furniture, and billiard tables. 

Two bowling alleys are being removed from the silver club at 
Paraiso, where they are little used, to the gold clubhouse at Pedro 
Miguel, where there has been a great demand on the part of the bow- 
lers for two additional alleys. 

Local entertainments were given as usual, and, in addition, enter- 
tainers have come down from the States about once in two months. 
Moving pictures are exhibited in all clubhouses; song services on 
Sunday nights at Ancon, Gatun, and Paraiso; study clubs at La Boca. 

A boys' work director was added to the personnel, and has the 
work well in hand at Balboa. 

The Y. W. C. A. is handling the girls' clubs in Balboa and Cristobal, 
assisted by this bureau. 

Following is the report of the director of physical education and 
play. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

(a) Classroom worlc. — A change in the character of the program of physical work 
conducted in the five white Canal Zone grammar schools by the bureau of clubs and 
playgrounds, for the division of schools, was instituted at the beginning of the 19 L9 
school year, last October, to take the place of the 2o-minute supervised recess held on 
the school playgrounds the previous year. The new program provides for lessons in 
marching, graded mass calisthenics, rythmic steps, in the school room 10 mintites each 
day, or, when the weather permitted, on the lawns near the school buildings. The 
new lessons were demonstrated to each class by the physical director of the local 
clubhouse once every two weeks, and reviewed daily by the classroom teacher. At 
the close of the school year over 200 children took part in a special school program on 
the lawn in front of the Balboa school building. This program consisted of a flag 
drill, circle games, pyramid work, apparatus work, tumbling, and push ball. 

(6) Gymnastic exercises. — Gymnastic classes for grammar school boys were held in 
the clubhouses, and consisted of setting up exercises, apparatus work, and games. 

(c) Tennis. — The uppar grade boys and girls were permitted to use the tennis 
courts, under supervision, several afternoons each week. All balls and rackets were 
furnished by the bureau. 

{d) Athletics. — The annual inter-class track and field meet for boys and girls held on 
the Balboa athletic field, May 29, 1920, was a great success, the seventh grade com- 
peting against the eighth, the fifth against the sixth, the third against the fourth and 
the first against the second. 

(e) Baseball. — A four-team baseball league for older boys was organized and a series of 

fames played on Saturdays and hoHdays during the months of January, February, and 
farch, and a playground league for boys of 90 pounds and under was organized, and 
games played off on Wednesdays and Fridays, after school, during the same period. 

HIGH-SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

(a) Physical training. — Classes for high-school students were held in the clubhouse 
gymnasium after school, from 3,20 to 4,20, two periods a week. The program for boys 
consisted of marching, calisthenics, apparatus work, wrestUng, and team games. The 
program for girls consisted of formal gymnastic apparatus work, gymnastic and esthetic 
dancing, and team games, special emphasis being placed in posture. An examination 
on posture was held at the close of the school year, and each girl was required to illus- 
trate her ideas of good and bad posture, by means of a chart. Some very clever work 
was done, and the best charts were placed on exhibition in the Balboa high-school 
auditorium. 

(6) Tennis. — The students of the high schools were given an opportunity to learn 
how to play tennis, free of charge, on courts operated by this bureau. Several weeks 
were spent in teaching the rudiments of the gxme, and as soon as the beginners were 
able to handle the rackets an inter-class tournament was held, consisting of singles of 
boys and girls, doubles, and mixed doubles. 

8847—20 16 



242 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

(c) Baseball. — Teams were organized in both the high schools, but were handicapped 
as usual by lack of opportunity for competition. A few games were played with teams 
composed of boys employed in the shops, older grammar-school boys' teams, teams 
composed of men from the Army and Navy stationed on the Zone, and an occasional 
game with crews from visiting ships. A large number of Balboa and Cristobal high- 
school boys played on teams in the Sunset and Twihght leagues. 

(d) Athletics. — The annual inter-class track and field meet for boys and girls was held 
on the Balboa athletic field, April 10, 1920, and a dual track meet between the two 
high schools on June 10, 1920. 

(e) Stvimming. — Swimming is one of the most important branches of physical edu- 
cation, £bnd classes were held in the Balboa pool twice a week throughout the season 
for grammar-school and high-school boys and girls, under the personal supervision 
of tiie swimming instructor. All members of the senior class of the Balboa High School 
were required to pass a rigid test before graduation, consisting of swimming, life- 
saAang, and resuscitation. 

In addition to the regular free swimming classes conducted for school children, the 
Balboa swimming pool continues to attract a steady stream of paid patronage from 
the Balboa, Ancon, and Corozal districts, and is increased from time to time by crews 
from visiting ships in transit through the Canal. Every effort is made to make the 
work interesting. An exhibition was staged for the benefit of approximately 1,000 
officers and men from a Japanese war vessel. Exhibitions of water polo games, diving, 
and s\vimming were arranged between the local high school and Adsiting crews of 
United States and British naA^al vessels. By special arrangement with the bui'eau of 
clubs and playgrounds, the Army and Navy Y. M. C. A. has furnished free swims, 
averaging approximately 800 per month, to United States ser\dce men stationed on 
the Zone, and crews of English and American war vessels in transit through the Canal. 
Gen. Pershing presented the Grieser silver trophy cup to a group of children who had 
qualified in swimming, diving, and life-saving. 

In Adew of the large participation in this more or less hazardous exercise, it is pleasing 
to note that there were no serious accidents in the Ball)oa pool during the year. 

Bowling. — Grammer-school and high-school boys and girls were permitted to use 
the clubhouse bowling alleys, free of charge, before 4 p. m. daily, and Saturday morn- 
ings, under super\dsion. Local mixed duck pin leagues were rolled off after 6 p. m., 
for men and women in the various communities, under the direction of the bowling 
alley manager, and a Pacific duck pin leagae, consisting of four teams, bowled a 
series of games during February and March. The alleys in the terminal clubhouses 
are always in great demand by crews from \dsiting ships. 

PLAYGROUNDS. 

New playsheds were added to the equipment at Pedro Miguel and Gatun, and one 
shed was erected near the Folks River Beach in New Cristobal, for the children living 
in that community. These sheds are approximately 42 by 80 feet, enclosed with 
chicken wire. Dirt floors have proven to be very unsatisfactory, and experiments 
were made Avith floors of asphal^t and concrete, at Balboa and Pedro Miguel, and it 
was found that a steel float finished floor would be satisfactory for all purposes in 
this climate. We propose to install these in all of our sheds, as soon as funds are 
available. 

Sand shelters and wading pools were also added to the equipment at Pedro Miguel 
and Gatun. These additions are very popular with the younger children, and we 
propose to build one of each on the playgrounds at Ancon and New Cristobal. 

The communities of Pedro Miguel and Gatun celebrated the opening of their new 
playsheds with appropriate exercises. Several hundred people were in attendance 
at each place. 

The playground programs were as follows: 

1. Children 3 to 6 years of age were in attendance from 9 to 10.30 a. m. daily, and 
were taught singing, games, dances, action plays, paper folding, and crayola work, 
and a half hour or more was devoted tp story telling and free play. Special comnaunity 
parties were held from time to time, in which the children took an active part in the 
programs, and assisted in preparing for and entertaining parents and visitors. 

2. (irammar school children from 6 to 12 years of age were assigned two to three 
periods a week, from 3 to 4 p. m. Instructions were given in dramatic action plajs, 
gynmastic drills, ball games, and free play. 

3. (irammar school boys and girls over 12 years of age, were given two or three 

Periods per week, on the playground, and in the clubhouse in inclement weather, 
he program for this group consisted of gymnastic drills, apparatus work, group and 
team games. 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 243^ 

SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE ON PLAYGROUNDS NOT INCLUDED IN CLUBHOUSE 

ACTIVITIES. 

Playgrounds supervised, approximately, 312 days per year. 

Average daily attendance of children 3 to 6 years of age, on 5 playgro.mds 164 

Average daily attendance of children 6 years and over, on 5 playgrounds 552 

Total average daily attendance all groups, on 5 playgrounds 717 

TOTAL ATTENDANCE. 

Balboa: 

Younger children 25, 507 

Older children 41, 391 

Ancon: 

Younger children 9, 357 

Older children mi, 673 

Pedro lligael: 

Younger children 2, 754 

Older children 2,534 

Gatun : 

Younger 5, 243 

Older children 7, 779 

Cristobal: 

Younger 8, 553 

Older children » 18, 993 



Total for year 223, 784 

OUTINGS, CAMPS, EXHIBITIONS, ETC. 

Two separate boys' camps of from ten to fifteen days each were conducted under 
supervision of the bureau at Boquette, in the Province of Chiriqui, Republic of 
Panama, and one girls' camp, in cooperation with the Y. W. 0. A., at Taboga Island, 
Repu])lic of Panama, last year. All-day hikes, and one-day camps were conducted 
on Saturdays and holidays throughout the dry season. Children's entertainments 
were promoted on the playgrounds Hallowe'en; Decoration Day was observed 
on all playgi-ounds by appropriate, patriotic children's exercises. A community 
Christmas pageant, with over 1G5 children and 50 adults participating, was directed 
and staged on the lawn in front of the administration building Christmas Night by 
emploj'-ees of the bureau. 

RECORD BUREAU. 

The work of the record bureau was carried on with a force of 23 
gokl and 2S silver employees. 

In addition to maintaining the current files and the permanent 
records of The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad, the bureau 
has charge of the accumulation and classification of records turned 
in by field offices; the publication of all rules and regulations, rates, 
circulars, etc.; the custody of documents and publications; the 
custody of timekeeping records; the indexing and recording of 
engineering records, iu'luding maps, drawings, and photographs; 
the receipt, distribution, and dis])atch of correspondence and mail 
matter for all ofii-es in the administration building other than the 
accounting department; the furnishing of messenger service for 
entire administration building; the operation of the Canal Zone 
library system. 

The library has five branches in the five Panama Canal 
clubhouses, each in charge of a library attendant. The clubhouse 
library attendants arc on the payrolls of the bureau of clubs and 

' The attendance on the Ancon and Cristobal playgrounds was increased materially by reason of the 
playRroiinds bi'in? close to the school and used by the school children imder supervision at recess times, 
and before and after school. 



244 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

playgrounds, but under the supervision of the librarian. There is 
also a juvenile librar}" at Balboa grade school. 

There have been 5,111 volumes accessioned, shelf -listed, classified, 
catalogued, and prepared for circulation. On «Tune 30, 1920, there 
were 1,139 registered borrowers, with a circulation of 1,625 volumes 
per month. 

PERSONNEL BUREAU. 

This bureau maintained the personnel file of each gold employee, 
accounting for the history of each employee's service, salary status, 
credits for leaves of absence, transportation, the organization status 
of (he different divisions and bureaus, and the records of all new 
employees requisitioned from the United States. Individual reports 
of leave of absence totaled 28,000. Printed leave orders issued for 
the files of both the Isthmian and Washington offices numbered 159. 
Approximately 4,000 requests for free or reduced rates of transporta- 
tion for employees and members of their families were issued by the 
bureau. Detailed records, approximating 5,000, of every position 
accredited to the organization of each division or bureau within the 
Isthmian organization were kept, showing the status of the position, 
whether filled or not, its record of salary status and incumbency. 
There were 538 authorities issued for free steamship transportation; 
2,671 for reduced rates on the Panama Raihoad Steamship Line; and 
60S for employees' rates on various other steamship lines. As in 
many cases the authorization issued covered transportation for both 
the employee and family, the total number of persons for whom 
transportation was authorized greatly exceed the number of authori- 
zations. Additional free or reduced railroad transportation on the 
Isthmus included approximately 4,000 employees' free 24-hour trip 
tickets over the Panama Railroad, 1,575 employees' 120-trip official 
business passes, and a miscellaneous number of school passes and 
individual card passes. 

Under the provisions of an act passed by the Sixty-sixth Congress 
for the retirement of employees in the classified civil service, the 
bureau arranged to commence the work of examining personnel files 
for the necessary report on employees who may be entitled to the 
benefits of the act. 

The increasing number of changes in rates of pay, and the numbers 
of transfers within the Canal organization tended to increase the work 
of this bureau for the year. The actual rate of turnover for the year 
was, however, less than for 1917 or 1918 during which periods the 
separation and return of employees who entered military duty caused 
an unusual amount of detailed work. 

PROPERTY BUREAU. 

Four of the five sections into which this bureau is subdivided 
handle the actual propeity accounting for the entire Canal and 
railroad organization; the other handles work requests, requisitions, 
expendable invoices, correspondence and files. Accounts are carried 
with all responsible officials, approximating 160 for the fiscal year. 
The supervision of these accounts involves the renewal of memo- 
randum receipts, and a ])hysical check of property twice annually. 



REPOET OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 



245 



In addition the accounts of any responsible ofTicial entering on leave, 
under transfer or resijjnino- ai'e checked in each instance. This work 
includes the Canal and railroad, for both of which the transfer of 
office equipment, and the preparation of requisitions and specifi- 
cations for the purchase of new equipment are handled. Based upon 
a count of the average of the different items shown for a period of 
six months' business, the following statement covers the principal 
items handled during the fiscal year : 

Handled, posted, and filed: 

Property vouchers 20, 294 

Surveys 1, 580 

Foremen's orders 6, 838 

Transfer receipts 1, 624 

Prepared : 

Work requests 2, 760 

Requisitions 6, 018 

Expendable invoices 3, 006 

Property invoices 5, 440 

Memorandum receipts renewed 1, 112 

Changes in responsible officials 652 

Accounts requiring recheck 182 

Entries on property returns 73, 030 

Inspection trips and inventories 930 

Letters written 4, 214 

Form letters and tracers 5, 796 

Forms of all kinds used - 274, 848 

Pages of property returns transferred to new returns semiannually 91, 156 

BUREAU OF PAY ROLLS. 

The work of this bureau is best presented in the following tabular 
form: 

Table No. 4. — Statement of work of the bureau of pay rolls, July 1, 1919, to June 30, 

1920. 



1919 

July 

A U'.'Ust 

Sept em her 

Oclol)pr 

Novomlipr 

December 

1920. 

Jaminry 

Feliru:iry 

M:irch 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



Coupon books. 



Collectpd for rent and 
electric current. 



Number, 
issued. 



78,390 
82,tvtl 
81,016 

81.n25 

78, 901 
95,022 



79,118 
75, ti74 
64,1.117 
71,021 
72, 20.-, 
78, li29 



933, 809 



Value. 



Pay roll 
deduction. 



S419, H.'i. 00 
444,(i(i2..''iO 
44."),0."..'^.00 
4.57, h%Q. 00 
448, 91(). 92 
551,930.95 



4S0.923.fi0 
4i.0, 74.'). 81) 
42:-!. 975. 10 
483, 050. :i2 
499, S.5.5. 02 
512,850.97 



310,192.39 
9,91.0.47 
9, 991 i. 18 
10,127.21) 
10, 004. 15 
9, 928. 05 



9,951.03 
2S2. 09 

13,8.54.25 
9, 445. 84 
9,X(i4.S9 

10,048.23 



5,(328,691.24 \ 113,654.83 



Cash. 



$171.04 
137. .57 
149. 19 
157. 73 
149. 80 
151. 72 



209. 93 
219.63 
22.i. 70 
240. 20 
23ti. 55 
215. 36 



2,262.42 



246 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 4. — Stateynent of luork of the bureau of pay rolls, July 1, 1919, to June SO, 

^9^0— Continued. 



Pay receipts prepared— Panama Canal. 



Gold. 



Num- 
ber. 



Gross 
amount. 



Silver. 



Net amount. 



Num- 
ber. 



Gross 
amount. 



Net amount. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



3,585 
3,077 
3,691 
3,794 
3,781 
3,771 



3,891 
3,936 
4,230 
4,218 
4,213 
4,160 



S633, 915. 77 
640,909.20 
642, 450. 96 
660, 703. OS 
650,611.09 
698,258.81 



708, 803. 62 
748,375.48 
795,322.95 
788, 820. 91 
760,510.14 
804, 834. 44 



S380, 209. 02 
389,811.19 
384, 105. 13 
400,411.55 
501, 858. 12 
526,520.93 



553,503.92 
590, 135. 48 
634,578.77 
022,488.69 
598,151.87 
639, 779. 18 



46, 947 



8,539,516.45 



6,221,553.85 



16,583 
15,289 
14,718 
14,471 
13, 151 
13,996 



14,019 
15, 330 
16,514 
14,382 
13,974 
13, 195 



S575, 009. 14 
573, 868. 42 
554,570.90 
573, 160. 50 
499, .327. 85 
544, 732. 46 



660,200.84 
479,8.55.55 
530, 345. 27 
564, 294. 37 
546, 262. 86 
546,489.24 



$337,051.99 
319, 680. 79 
312,691.22 
328, 602. 99 
281,440.00 
274,027.14 



323, 185. 21 
268,405.83 
340,231.36 
340,966.89 
313, 68.5. 62 
304, 959. 05 



175, 622 



6,548,117.40 



3,744,994.69 



Pay receipts prepared— Panama Railroad. 



Gold. 



Num- 
ber. 



Gross 
amount. 



Net amount. 



Silver. 



Num- 
ber. 



Gross 
amoimt. 



Net amount. 



1919. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1920. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



879 
749 
779 
757 
729 
788 



755 
797 
905 
878 
852 
840 



$143,826.06 
139, 973. 49 
137, 172. 14 
131,340.22 
127,307.47 
134,599.34 



135,028.22 
136,2(53.43 
149, 101. 23 
150, 644. 84 
144,840.06 
143, 652. 87 



S89, 829. 08 
84,971.05 
82,293.71 
76,371.79 
94,244.08 
95,323.87 



100, 967. 73 
102, 625. 03 
112,869.72 
114,-537.54 
108,695.49 
108,020.98 



12,700 
14,876 
14,593 
13,338 
12,840 
10,951 



17, 133 

15,254 
19,509 
18,024 
15,999 
15,432 



S240, 791. 89 
284, 707. 48 
277,299.05 
245, .520. 18 
237, 171.. 50 
320, 179. 59 



303,869.29 
261,024.42 
328, 421. 36 
330, 077. 93 
317, 689. 91 
311,117.91 



$169,014.93 
200, 124. Si 
196, 503. 94 
103, 547. 50 
158, 329. 91 
222,241.47 



219,393.44 
184, 490. 57 
259, 148. 21 
244,202.10 
222, 875. 38 
212,597.16 



9,708 



1,073,809.37 



1, 170, 750. 07 



186,709 



3,404,470.57 



2,452,469.52 



BUREAU OF STATISTICS. 



This bureau continued its routine work of compiling vital statistics, 
which form part of the report of the chief health officer; statistics of 
navigation, which form part of the report of the marine superintend- 
ent; the handling of wage authorizations; and the compilation of 
matter for The Panama Canal Jiecord. Numerous special studies 
of the Canal services were made for publication, or in answer to pri- 
vate inquiries. 

Publicity, wage adjustment, cost of living studies, and the super- 
vision of the decennial census formed part of the work carried on by 
this bureau. 



REPORT OP EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 



247 



SURVEYING OFFICER. 

The surveying officer is charged with the inspection and making 
recommendation to the Governor as to disposition to be made oi 
equipment or material which has become unserviceable, to make 
recommendations for relief of accountability for lost or damaged 
property, and to pass upon the responsibility of officers and em- 
ployees for such loss or damage. He acts as chairman of the board 
of appraisal, property board, and board on destruction of public 
records; and handles loans of property on a rental basis, except 
leases of land. During the year the following surveys and appraisals 
were passed: 

Two thousand nine hundred and ten formal requests for disposition 
on surplus, obsolete, unserviceable, and deteriorated property, which 
were disposed of by destruction, scrap recovery, sales to individuals 
and companies, and transfers to other departments of the Govern- 
ment. Total value, $1,324,350.18. 

Two hundred and twenty-one individual appraisals of plant, sal- 
vaged material, etc. Total value, $496,101.65. 

Thirty-four requests for destruction of obsolete public records, all 
of which were burned, the paper having no salvage value. 

Twenty-two requests for loan of property (since February, 1920), 
revenue, $747.28. 

DIVISION OF SCHOOLS. 

The division continued under the superintendence of Mr. A. R. 
Lang. 

A survey of the schools during the past four years is given in the 
following; statement : 



1917 


1918 


1919 


19 


17 


16 


3 
70 




2 
95 


81 


2 


3 


3 


S87,000 


$140,000 


$149,000 


$100,000 


$.560,000 


$560,000 


2,373 


2,774 


3,006 


1,518 


1,764 


1,778 


855 


1,010 


1,228 


$36.66 


$50.83 


$49. 67 


295,697.0 


350, 619. 


371,602.5 


209,782.0 


239,527.5 


242, 678. 5 


85,915.0 


111,091.5 


128,924.0 


1,709.2 


1,963.2 


2,178.5 


1,212.6 


1,322.9 


1,423.3 


496. 6 


640.3 


755.2 


234.5 


312.5 


374.5 


$109. 52 

$&5.00 

$3,510.19 


$125. 58 

$67. 67 

$4,364.64 


$141.88 

$71.50 

$4,057.00 



1920 



Number of school buildings 

Buildings erected and converted 

Number of employees in division 

Number of supervisory force 

Total expenditures (approximate) 

Estimated value of school property 

Net enrollment 

White schools 

Colored schools 

Per capita expense of maintenance (approximate) based 

on net enrollment 

Total days of attendance 

White schools 

Colored schools 

Average daily attendance 

White schools 

Colored schools 

Absence of teachers on account of sickness, days 

Average monthly wages of teachers: 

White 

Colored 

Tuition collected 



16 



100 

3 

$192,000 

$560, 000 

3,485 

2,004 

1,481 

$55.10 

397,970.0 

271,143.0 

126,827.0 

2,453.4 

1,588.5 

864.9 

441.0 

$158. 46 

$76. 00 

$5,358.00 



248 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

The enrollment by schools was as follows : 



Balboa hisrh 

Cristobal hisrh 

A nroii — grades 

Ball'oa — frrndes 

Peilro Miguel— grades. 

Gatun— grades 

Cristobal— grades 

Paraiso— grades 

Empire— grades 



Total. 



Total white and colored. 



White schools. 



Gross. 



181 
03 
400 
814 
ir,0 
Vh 
489 



2,278 



1 4, 400 



Net. 



179 
02 
347 
722 
133 
120 
435 



Colored schools. 



Gross. 



500 
297 
305 
351 
381 
288 



2,188 



Net. 



393 
208 
231 
223 
233 
193 



1,481 



1 Compared with 3, 405 forthesphool year 1918-1919. 

2 Compared with 3, 000 for the school year 1918-1919. 



The enrollment by grades was as follows : 





Schools. 










Grade. 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


Total. 


White 




338 
001 


258 
218 


254 
231 


274 
194 


197 
147 


109 
39 


150 
.38 


123 
13 


88 


75 


38 


40 


2,004 


Colored . 


1,481 
















Total. 


939 


470 


48.5 


4(i8 


344 


208 


188 


130 


88 


75 


33 


40 


3,485 







In addition to the regular school work, which was conducted accord- 
ing to the highest standards in schools in the United States, the 
following matters seem of special importance or interest. 

Physical examinations were conducted during the year in both the 
white and colored schools and proper remedies were prescribed for 
defects. 

Manual training and household art classes were held at Cristobal 
for the white pupils of Gatun and Cristobal Schools and at Balboa 
for the white pupils of the Pedro Miguel, Ancon, and Balboa Schools. 

Physical training and athletics were continued in the schools, 
under the supervision of the bureau of clubs and playgrounds. A 
more extended reference to this work will be found in the report of 
that bureau. The physical instruction applies to both girls and boys. 

Music was continued and satisfactory progress was made, the 
improvement in the grade schools })cing especially marked. 

At Cristobal a night school for vSpanish was conducted, and at 
Balboa a ni^ht school for English, French, history, Spanish, shorthand, 
and manual training. 

The Palmer method of business Avriting has been supervised for 
two years in the Canal Zone schools. Classes for teachers and 
pupils were held twice every three weeks. The improvement in 
writing during the past year has been marked, especially in the 
lower grades. 

Junior Red Cross work was continued in the white schools, where 
every pupil is a member. This work was begun in the colored 
schools. 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 



249 



EDUCATION OP APPRENTICES. 



On July 1, ]019, there were 44 apprentices taking the apprentice 
courses. Fourteen new apprentices were eiu"olled during the year, 
10 graduated, 3 resigned ]>efore completing their apprenticeship, and 
1 was discharged due to failure to progress satisfactorily. At the 
close of the year there were 48 apprentices, distributed as follows: 



Blarksmiths 2 

Boilermakers '. 5 

Coppersmiths 1 

Chemi-t^ 1 

Elef Lricians 4 

Machinists: 

General 16 

Automohile 1 

Molders 1 



Pattern makers 1 

Pipefitters 4 

Shipfi tiers 5 

Shipjoiners 3 

Shipwrights 3 

Welders 1 

Total 48 



The 10 apprentices who graduated were distributed as follows: 



Machinists... 
l^lai ksniiths. 
Draftsman. . . 



Ship fitter.. . 
Boiler maker. 
Pipe fitter... 



The "Rules for the Employment of Apprentices," which were 
issued in printed form September 15, 1917, were revised, efi'ective 
May 1, 1920. Tlie main change consists in the method of making 
appointments. There are so many more applications for appren- 
ticeships than there are vacancies that appointment after com- 
petitive examination was considered the most satisfactory way to 
handle the matter, and it is believed that those appointed in this 
manner will be more suitable. The new rules increase the maximum 
age at the time of appointment from 19 to 20 j-ears, thus enabling 
the boys to get one more 3'ear of schooling before taldng up the 
apprenticeships. 

POLICE AND FIRE DIVISION. 



Tliis division continued under the direction of Mr. Guy Johannes. 
The following statement shows the force of the division June 30, 1920: 



stations. 


Police. 


Fire. 


Paid. 


Volunteers. 


Total. 


Headqtinrters. . 


2 

7 
42 
22 
27 


2 




2 










15 




15 








I'cdro -VliKuel 


4 


20 
9 
20 
26 
31 
29 
29 


24 




9 


Kcd Tank 






20 









26 








31 








29 


(Jil 1 liiit 






29 




47 
15 
2 
3 


18 
4 


18 


Ciu til n . . . 


20 
2 

11 
3 

36 

33 


24 
2 






11 






3 








36 


Tim Tabeniiilu 






33 




16 














Total 


183 


43 


269 


312 







250 THE PANAMA CANAL. 



POLICE SECTION. 



In addition to the routine work of this division numerous confi- 
dential investigations and reports in connection with the protection 
of The Panama Canal and the general interests of the United States 
on the Isthmus were made. Labor troubles, resulting in a strike 
of the silver employees, also caused a great amount of extra work 
for the division during the latter half of the fiscal year. 

During the year 4,202 persons were arrested, of whom 4,026 were 
males and 176 females, an increase of 220 as compared with the 
previous year. Two thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight 
arrests were made without warrants, 636 were made with warrants, 
and 668 were disposed of without trial. 

A monthly average of 92.25 prisoners served sentences in the 
common jails during the year, and all those physically able were 
employed in tlie construction and repair of roads, and others were 
employed on janitor and miscellaneous work at police and fii'e sta- 
tions. The total value of the labor performed by the prisoners 
amounted to $19,486.94. 

Five hornicides were committed and in all cases but one the 
ofi'enders were brought to trial. 

Only one arrest was made for violation of the opium act, and 
due to the vigilance of the police this traffic was practically sup- 
pressed. 

Monthly patrols of the interior sections of tlie Canal Zone were 
continued throughout the year to determine if any new clearings or 
cultivations were being made, or if any new buildings were being 
constructed by private parties in the depopulated areas. Twenty- 
three arrests for trespass on Canal Zone lands were made during the 
year, and 21 convictions were secured. 

Fift3^-four persons were deported from the Canal Zone by the 
police during the year. Of this number 49 were convicts who had 
completed terms of imprisonment, and 5 were persons who had 
been convicted of misdemeanor charges or who were deemed unde- 
siral)le persons to be permitted to remain on the Canal Zone. 

Plain clothes officers continued extensive and numerous investi- 
gations in connection with the protection of the Canal and enforce- 
ment of the travel regulations, m addition to the usual police work. 
Plain clothes officers effected 345 arrests on misdemeanor and 
felony charges, and investigations were also conducted in 255 cases 
which did not require arrest and many cases in which defendants 
could not be found. 

A house-to-house canvass of the population of the Canal Zone was 
taken by the poUce force between August 20 and August 31, 1919, 
and again between June 10 and June 30, 1920. The enumeration 
consisted of an accurate count of the entire civilian population for 
the information of local officials, giving number of males, females, 
and children, and whether employees or nonemployees, but no 
detailed data, which would have required too much extra work for 
the police. 

Sixty-five convicts were received at the penitentiary during the 
year. The aggregate sentences imposed on convicts amounted to 
83 years 9 months and 21 days. Fifty-one convicts completed 



BEPORT OP EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 



251 



terms of imprisonment and were discharged from prison, as com- 
pared with 64 discharged the previous year. These convicts had 
earned 4 years 10 months and 4 days "good time". Discharged 
convicts were deported in all cases permissible by law. At the 
close of the year 53 convicts remained m custody, as compared with 
39 at the close of the previous year. 

Most of the convicts were employed during the year on the con- 
struction of the new Paraiso-Gamboa road. A few were employed 
on a small farm adjacent to the penitentiary, and for the mainte- 
nance of the prison buildings and grounds, manufacture and repair 
of prison clothing, and other maintenance labor. 

A considerable quantity of produce was raised on the small farm 
adjacent to the penitentiary and used in supplementing the food 
ration allowed the convicts. This produce aided considerably in 
offsetting the increased cost of food. 

Number of arrests, hy fiscal years, made on Canal Zone since organization. 



Period. 



Number of 
arrests. 



June 2, 1904, to June 30, 190.5 
July 1, 1905, to June 30, 1906, 
July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907, 
July 1, 1907, to June 30, 1908 
July 1, 1908, to June 30, 1909, 
July 1, 1909, to June 30, 1910 
July 1, 1910, to June 30, 1911 
Julv 1, 1911, to June 30, 1912 
JuiV 1, 1912, to June 30, 1913 
JulV 1, 1913, to June 30, 1914 
July 1, 1914, to June 30, 1915 
July 1, 1915, to June 30, 1916 
July 1, 1916, to June 30, 1917 
JulV 1, 1917, to Jnne 30, 1918 
July 1, 1918, to June 30, 1919 
Julv 1, 1919, to Jnne 30, 1920 

Total 



2,130 
3,748 
5,831 
6,075 
6,275 
6,947 
5,959 
7,055 
6,627 
4,911 
5,157 
4,480 
4,881 
4,426 
3,982 
4,202 



82, 696 



Number of arrests, by months, made during fiscal year ended June 30, 1920. 



Months. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


With 
warrant. 


Without 
warrant. 


Disposed 
of with- 
out trial. 


1919. 
July 


296 
274 
327 
305 
289 
311 

411 
276 
307 
362 
416 
452 


27 
25 
10 

18 
15 
9 

14 
15 

7 
8 
17 
U 


323 
299 
337 
323 
304 
320 

425 
291 
314 
370 
433 
463 


61 
33 
55 
71 
39 
47 

65 
48 
52 
52 
55 
58 


235 
239 
247 

188 
235 
229 

293 
223 
189 
202 
272 
286 


27 




27 


September 


35 




64 


November . . ... 


30 


December 


44 


1920. 


67 




20 


March 


73 




56 


May 


106 




119 






Total 


4,026 


176 


4,202 


636 


2,898 


668 







252 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 
Arrests by stations, fiscal year ended June SO, 1920. 





Station and substation. 


Number of 
arrests. 


Balboa Central Station 




1 251 


Ancon 


304 


Pedro ^ti<;llel 


224 


Cristobal Ceutral Station 


2 251 


Gatu 1 


121 


Mo:Ue Lino 


5 


Gamboa 


46 








Total 


4,202 






Statement of disposition of persons arrested, fiscal year ended June 80, 1920. 



Disposition. 

Tried i n courts: 

Convi -ted 

Di^mi^sed 

Continued on June 30, 1920 

Otherwise disposed of on proper authority 

Total persons arrested 



FIRE SECTION. 

Periodica] inspections of all government buildings, docks, store- 
houses, yards, etc., were conducted by the fire section throughout 
the year. Fire hose and fire extinguishers were maintained in 
good condition at all locations where such equipment was installed 
for special protection, and installations were made in many new 
buildings constructed during the year. 

Fifteen volunteer fire companies were maintained on the Canal 
Zone until March 1, 1920, wdien this number was increased to 22 
companies, being an increase of 7 companies over the number in 
existence at the close of the previous year. This increase was 
distributed as follows: Three new companies each for the tugs 
Gorgona and Tahernilla, and one additional company for the tug 
Porto Bello. Each company was composed of a maximum of 20 
men, employees of The Panama Canal or Panama Railroad. 

One hundred twenty-nine fires and 14 false alarms were reported 
during the year. Eighty-eight fires occurred in property of The 
Panama Canal, 21 in Panama Railroad property, 3 in L'nited States 
Army property, 2 in United States Navy property, and 15 in private 
and United States Shipping Board property. Infty-nine fires were 
in dry grass, brush, scraj), and rubbish. 

The total losses from all fires during the year amounted to S3, 567,- 
083.85. of which $1,970,000 represents loss due to a fire on the 
United States Shipping Board steamer Mnrne; $1,502,000 on the 
United States Shipping Bonrd steamer Olodson; $47,000 loss to 
Army storehouse at Empire; $8,000 to United States Army 
launch in Cristobal Harbor; $12,000 to United States Navy bonthouse 
at Darien; and $15,000 to steamship Cromi of Ualacia in Cristobal 
Harbor. Aside from these fires, it will be noted that fire losses on 
the Canal Zone were very low. 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 

Statement of fires and losses and property. 



253 



Fiscal year. 


Number 
of fires. 


False 
alarms. 


Total 
damage. 


Total 
property 
involved. 


1QTV1007 


45 

71 

92 

123 

233 

31.5 

202 

207 

142 

86 

104 

69 

90 

129 




$100,000.00 

40, 170. .-O 

10,934.92 

3,237.04 

53,077.44 

12, 653. 58 

22, 520. 97 

21,376.96 

153,2S6.95 

28,418.47 

3,19.1.25 

259,351.60 

40,805.13 

3,567,08.3.85 


81,300,000.00 


1917-1018 


12 

6 

10 

14 

IS 

18 

8 

13 

11 

9 

5 

8 

14 


1,007,619.45 


190S- IOf)0 


1,624,803.65 


1C)(1()_1910 


1,212,335.19 


1010-1911 


2,2.56,210.01 


1011-1012 


1,826,995.68 


loi2-ioi:{ . . 


1,041,4.50.19 


1913- 1014 


1,993,012.61 


1914-101.5 


2,465,654.18 


1915-lOir, 


1,651,122.11 


19in-1017 


1,044,7.52.59 


igi7_l()tS 


6,ir«.5,991.38 


10i8-i;u9 


9, 2.56, 369. 35 


1919-1920 


8, 906, 017. 28 







DIVISION OF CIVIL AFFAIRS. 

This division continued under the direction of Mr. C. H. Calhoun. 

BUREAU OP POSTS. 

The total receipts from the postal service were $138,391.60, as 
compared with $136,627.40 for the preceding year, an increase of 
$1,764.20. The postage sales amounted to $87,096.72, as compared 
with $81,343.78 for the year ended June 30, 1919, and $1,782.53 were 
collected for second-class matter, as compared with $2,553.88 during 
the preceding year. Interest received on deposit money order funds 
amounted to $22,141.38 during the year, as compared with $25,746.20 
during the preceding year. Table No. 8 accompanying the report 
of the chief of the division of civil affairs shows in detail the re- 
ceipts during the present year as compared with the year ending 
June 30, 1919. 

The Canal Zone postal service is still required by the Executive 
order of December 3, 1904 — one of the Executive orders of the 
so-called "Taft agreement" — to purchase from the Republic of 
Panama all postage stamps sold in the Canal Zone post offices at 40 
per cent of their face value. This 40 per cent subsidy to the Pana- 
man Government amounted to $33,783.97 during the fiscal year. 
The revenues from the postal service would have exceeded the 
expenditures for the fiscal year by $70,178.86 if the 40 per cent 
subsidy on stamp sales had not been paid and if all mail matter 
had been paid for at regular rates. 

There were 125,123 money orders, including deposit orders, issued 
during the year, amounting to $3,199,996.98, on which fees amount- 
ing to $10,207.85 were collected. Compared with the preceding 
fiscal year, there was a decrease of 15,495 in the number of orders 
issued, an increase of $91,295.32 in the amount and a decrease of 
$216.31 in the fees collected. 

Deposit money orders issued during the year had a total value of 
$1,143,225, and pajonents of deposit money orders during the same 
period aggregated $1,043,080. The balance on deposit to this 
account on June 30, 1920, was $520,070, as compared with $419,925 
on deposit at the close of the previous year. 



254 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

In the registry division of the post offices 273,778 letters and 
parcels were handled, as compared with 292,698 for the previous 
hscal year. Of this number 146,523 registers were dispatched, 
subdivided as follows: Twenty-eight thousand seven hundred and 
seventy-nine domestic letters, 3,808 domestic parcels, 25,642 foreign 
letters, 4,804 foreign parcels, 79,991 official letters and parcels regis- 
tered free, 88 c. o. d. parcels, and 3,411 domestic parcels insured. 
Compared with the preceding year there was an increase of 10,168 
registered letters and registered and insured parcels dispatched. 

Customs duty was paid to the Republic of Panama to the amount 
of $33,452 on 14,302 mail parcels for nonemployees and on dutiable 
articles imported by employees, as compared with $25,289.71 on 
9,591 parcels during the preceding year. 

Under arrangements entered into with the United States Post Office 
Department in 1916 all transit United States mail and foreign closed 
mail destined to the west coast of Central and South America is 
consigned to the director of posts of the Canal Zone. This arrange- 
ment continues to produce most gratifying results both as to the 
more rapid onward dispatch of the mails and a very material economy 
in the cost of its transportation. In this connection the following 
excerpt from the report of the Postmaster General for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1919, is quoted below: 

The arrangement which became effective November 1, 1916, whereby all mails 
dispatched from the United States for the west coast of South America via the Isthmus 
of Panama are consigned to the director of posts of the Canal Zone, who supervises 
their onward dispatch, continued to operate with gratifying results and f xirther reduced 
the cost of the Isthmus transit of United States mails, the cost for the fiscal year 1919 
being $12,773.94, or 14,609.12 less than the cost for the fiscal year 1918 and $94,820.51 
less than the year 1916. 

Attention is called to the fact that by this arrangement the cost 
of transporting and handling transit United States mails at the 
Canal Zone for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1919, was $136,958.98 
less than in the year 1913, before the opening of the Canal in 1914, 
although the volume of mail has increased. The figures for the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1920, are not yet available. 

During the year ended June 30, 1920, there was received and dis- 
patched a total of 107,161 sacks of transit mail from New York and 
New Orleans, an increase of 16,070 sacks, or nearly 18 percent, over 
the previous fiscal year. Of this total, 94,733 sacks originated in the 
United States and 12,428 in foreign countries. 

A count of all mail matter received, dispatched, and handled in 
transit in the Canal Zone was made during the period from October 
16, 1919, to November 15, 1919, inclusive. During the same period 
all mail matter handled free under "official business" frank was 
weighed. The result showed that 848,626 pieces of all classes of 
mail were handled. 

Of the total of 848,626 pieces of mail handled, 228,153 pieces, or 
26 per cent, were handled under ofiicial frank without postage. 

BUREAU OF CUSTOMS. 

The bureau of customs has been conchu^ted under regulations em- 
bodied in Governor's Circular No. 679 of July 14, 1914, as revised on 
November 21,1914. The work is closely allied to that of the marine 
division, the quarantine service, the division of police, and the 
Panama Railroad Company, and the bureau of customs cooperates 



EEPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 255 

with all these branches in order to avoid unnecessary duplication 
of work in connection with the handling of shipping and cargoes. 

There has been a large increase in shipping at Canal ports during 
the past year. The total number of vessels entered was 6,023 and 
the total number cleared was 6,016, as compared with 4,604 entered 
and 4,590 cleared during the previous fiscal year. 

The total number of American vessels entered was 2,779 and the 
total number of American vessels cleared was 2,778, as compared 
with 1,959 entered and 1,940 cleared during the fiscal year 1919. 

The increase in the total number of vessels entered during the 
year — an increase of approximately 118 per month, or almost 4 
a day— has resulted in a large increase in the work of the customs 
force. 

SHIPPIlSra COMMISSIONER. 

The chief of the division of civil affairs is also shipping commis- 
sioner and the chief customs inspectors are deputy shipping com- 
missioners. According to law the shipping commissioner and his 
deputies have the same powers as shipping commissioners in United 
States ports and American consuls in foreign ports with respect to 
American seamen. 

The ports of the Canal have a peculiar status, as under some cir- 
cumstances they are considered American ports and under others 
they are considered foreign ports, which makes it necessary for the 
shipping commissioner and deputy shipping commissioners in the 
Canal Zone to be familiar with the duties of American consuls in 
foreign ports and shipping commissioners in American ports. 

The nicrease of 820 American vessels entered and 838 cleared 
from Canal Zone ports during the present year, as compared with 
the year 1919 — more than 2 each day — ^has created a great deal 
of additional work. There were 4,281 seamen shipped on American 
vessels and 3,278 seamen discharged, as compared with 4,182 
shipped and 3,453 discharged during tlie preceding year. There were 
624 American seamen lodged or subsisted in the Canal Zone during 
the year. Of this number, 288 were returned to the United States 
at the expense of the appropriation for the relief of destitute American 
seamen, and the remaining 336 were signed on vessels as seamen or 
workaways and returned to the United States without expense to 
the Government. 

ADMINISTRATION OP ESTATES. 

During the year 258 estates of deceased and insane employees of 
The Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad Company were 9,d- 
ministered, as compared with 161 estates during 1919, and there 
were 26 estates in course of settlement on June 30, 1920. 

The amount involved in the settlement of the 258 estates was 
$16,314.77, of which $15,446.87 belonged to decedents' estates and 
S867.90 to the estates of insane persons. 

THE COURTS. 

The district courts, one each at Cristobal and Balboa, handled 
fewer cases this year than last. There were 359 cases pending at 
the beginning of the year; 875 were filed, 952 settled, and 282 pend- 
ing on June 30, 1920. Of the cases pending the first of the year 158 
were civil, 119 probate, and 82 criminal. Cases filed included 157 



256 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

civil, 348 probate, and 370 criminal. Those settled included 189 
civil actions, 101 of which were decided, 83 dismissed, 4 transferred, 
and 1 reported off; 337 probate cases; and 426 criminal actions, 51 
of which were acquitted, 253 convicted, 67 nol prossed, 52 dismissed, 
and 3 transferred. There were 195 sessions of court. A total of 
879 marriage licenses was issued and 5 deeds recorded. Collection 
of costs, lines, forfeitures, fees, etc., amounted to $9,431.17. 

The magistrates' courts, one each at Cristobal and Balboa, had 
13 civil and four criminal cases over from last year s business. There 
were 3,835 cases docketed during the year, 3,744 criminal and 91 
civil; 3,838 cases were disposed of, leaving 3 civil and 11 criminal 
actions pending at the close of the year. Collections from all sources 
amounted to $17,863.91. 

Under the provisions of an Executive order of May 10, 1911, peti- 
tions were issued during the year from the magistrate's court to the 
district judge for the commitment of 61 persons to the Corozal 
Asylum for observation; these included 32 white persons, males 
(including 20 soldiers) ; 29 negroes, 24 male and 5 female. 

SPECIAL ATTORNEY AND DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

The reports of the special attorney and district attorney are 
printed as appendixes of the Governor's report. 

MARSHAL FOR THE CANAL ZONE. 

The marshal for the Canal Zone received 755 writs, subpoenas, and 
other processes for service during the year, of which 694 were 
served and 61 unserved, as the parties concerned could not be located 
on the Zone. The marshal, or his deputy, attended at Balboa district 
court 135 daj^s and at Cristobal district court 60 days. Fees collected 
and turned over to the collector of The Panama Canal totaled $448.60, 
and the amount of fees paid witnesses for the Government during the 
year was $212. 

Relations with Panama. 

Negotiations by correspondence or personal conference between the 
executive secretary of The Panama Canal and the Secretary of 
Foreign Relations "of the Republic of Panama included the following 
subjects, in addition to routine matters: 

Conferences between representatives of the Republic of Panama and The Panama 
Canal regarding alleged abuse of commissary privileges. 

Sales of road-buildiug material, unobtainable elsewhere, to Panaman Government. 

Inspection of condition of Bolivar Asylum, Panama. 

Requests of Panaman Government for the appearance of Panama Canal employees 
as witnesses in Panama courts. 

Panama advised regarding fjuality of meat from castrated and uncastrated cattle. 

Adoption of uniform regulations for issuance of chauffeurs' licenses. 

Reinspection by customs employees of Panama of baggage already inspected by 
Canal Zone inspectors. 

Bonded warehouses in Republic of Panama. 

Preference to Panaman Government in the leasing of certain lots in Colon. 

Requests for data regarding material and supp ies sold by The Panama Canal to 
private concerns for purpose of constructing buildings in Canal Zone. 

Transfer of the United Fruit Company's wireless station from Bocas del Toro to 
port of Almirante authorized by Panaman Government without prior approval of the 
Governor of The Panama Canal. 

Tariff rates for telegraphic and telephonic messages sent over wires operated by the 
Panaman Government. 

Request of the board of directors of the Santa Tomas Hospital for removal of the 
superintendent. 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 257 

Complaints of planters of Taboga regarding alleged regulation prohibiting their 
shipping fruits on southbound steamers. 

Advice of Secretary of Foreign Relations requested regarding pardon of Convict 
Francisco Zaldivar. 

Docking charges on Republic of Panama boat San Bias at Pier No. 2. 

Proposed arrangement of West India Oil Co. with Panaman Government for 
securing drawback. 

Transportation of liquors through Canal Zone for towns in interior of Panama con- 
tiguous to the Canal Zone. 

Clearing boundary line between Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama. 

Acquisition of certain territory for military purposes at Largo Remo, near mouth of 
the Chagres River. 

Inspection of cattle as sanitary measure. 

Operation of a saloon near Canal Zone boundary in Colon in violation of decree ol 
Republic of Panama. 

Proposed construction of storm sewer in the vicinity of the market, Panama City. 

Exportation of Panaman silver currency by Panama Canal employees. 

Deportation of foreign prostitutes from Panama to their native land. 

Increased payments necessary to cover cost of cleaning streets and collecting garbage 
in Panama City. 

Construction of new Santo Tomas Hospital. 

Articles of wearing apparel stolen from Army stores and sold to a nlerchant in 
Panama. 

Passports for alien enemies through Isthmus from foreign ports. 

Collection of duty on timber exported from Panaman forests. 

Petition of Colon coachmen for increase in rates. 

Resolution No. 378 of Republic of Panama denying refund of customs duties. 

Condition of lights on Pier 2, Colon. 

Transfer of lease rights of lot 13 , block 19, Colon , for fii-e station instead of post-office site . 

Suit against Panama Railroad for portion of Javillo fill. 

Water supply for the town of New Chagres. 

Authentication of documents emanating from the judicial authorities of the Canal 
Zone for the Republic of Panama. 

Cooperation of Republic of Panama with Panama Canal in matter of strike of silver 
employees. 

Payment requested of Republic of Panama of amount due health department, 
$160,000. 

Request of Panaman Government for telephone line to Taboga Island. 

Charges for inspection of cattle and meat at the municipal slaughter houses in Panama 
and Colon. 

Panaman Government objects to use as silver quarters of certain buildings on 
Panama Railroad stable lots on account of inflammables being stored near by. 

Land required for military purposes on Taboga Island. 

Special commissioners of Republic of Panama to take up matters of interest to 
Panama with Secretary of War. 

Report on physical condition of Henry N. Schneider, an American soldier, wounded 
in Panama. 

Final report of the joint commission. 

Free entry of certain goods for the Knights of Columbus for free distribution among 
enlisted men. 

Suggested change in Panaman customs regulations to allow nonemployees to bring 
in reasonable amount of cigars, cigarettes, or tobacco for their own use. 

Memoi'ial protesting against extradition of certain merchants of Colon implicated in 
thefts from Panama Railroad docks. 

Legislation. 

The various acts of Congress and Executive orders affecting The 
Panama Canal and the Canal Zone appear as an appendix to the 
Governor's report. 

Respectfully submitted. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 
Brig. Gen. Chester Harding, United States Army, 

Governor, The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. 
8847—20 17 



Appendix to Appendix F. 

KEPORT OF CHIEF OF DIVISION OF CIVIL AFFAIRS, EXECU- 
TIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, July 29, 1920. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the division 
of civil affairs for 1920: 

Bureau of Posts. 

The total receipts from the postal service, including box rents, pay- 
ments from the Panama Railroad Company, payments from the Pan- 
aman Government for handling its mail between Panama and Colon, 

Payments from the United States Post Office Department for hau- 
ling United States transit mails, interest on deposit money order 
funds, sales of postage stamps and other stamped paper, collections 
for second-class mail matter, money-order fees, and miscellaneous re- 
ceipts, were $138,391.60, as compared with $136,627.40 for the pre- 
ceding year, an increase of $1,764.20. The sale of postage stamps 
and postal cards, including the receipts from the sale of stamp books, 
amounted to $87,096.72, as compared with $81,343.78 for the year 
ended June 30, 1919, and $1,782.53 were collected for second-class 
matter, as compared with $2,553.88 during the preceding year. In- 
terest received on deposit money order funds amounted to $22,141.38 
during the year, as compared with $25,746.20 during the preceding 
year. There is attached hereto a detailed statement showing the 
receipts during the present year as compared with the year ending 
June 30, 1919. 

The Canal Zone postal service is still required by the Executive 
order of December 3, 1904 — one of the Executive orders of the so- 
called "Taft agreement" — to purchase from the Republic of Panama 
all postage stamps sold in the Canal Zone post offices at 40 per cent 
of their face value. This 40 per cent subsidy to the Panaman Gov- 
ernment amounted to $33,783.97 during the fiscal year. The Panama 
Railroad Company and commissaries are permitted to use the official 
business frank in the Canal Zone for a consideration of $100 per month; 
whereas an actual count of all mail matter handled during one month 
of the year showed that, if postage had been required at the regular 
rates, the amount of $1,699.13 would havo'been collected during that 
month for postage. The bureau of posts carries free the official mail 
of The Panama Canal and the Army and Navy within the Canal Zone, 
and pays transportation charges to the United States. There is at- 
tached hereto a statement showing that the revenues from the postal 
service would have exceeded the expenditures for the fiscal year by 
$70,178.86 if the 40 per cent subsidy on stamp sales had not been 
paid and if all mail matter had been paid for at regular rates. 

258 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 259 

NUMBER OF POST OFFICES. 

The number of post offices in operation (16) remained unchanged 
during the year, except during the period from August 1 to 15, 1919, 
inckisive, when the post offices at Fort Amador, Fort Randolph, Par- 
aiso. Empire, and Coco Solo were closed temporarily due to the fact 
that the funds at first allotted for the postal service for the fiscal year 
were insufficient to continue all post offices in operation, 

LOCK BOXES. 

During the months of May and June, 1920, 1,778 additional lock 
boxes were received and installed in post offices. The total cost of 
the new lock boxes was .'55,923, and it is estimated that the total 
revenue from rentals for the period of one year will amount to 
$4,836.40. 

The box rents collected during the year amounted to $8,776.55, as 
compared with $8,268.20 for the previous year. 

MONEY ORDERS. 

There were 125,123 money orders, including deposit orders, issued 
during the year, amounting to $3,199,996.98, on which fees amount- 
ing to $10,207.85 were collected. The average amount of each order 
was $25.57. Compared with the preceding fiscal year, there was a 
decrease of 15,495 in the number of orders issued, an increase of 
$91,295.32 in the amount, and a decrease of $216.31 in the fees col- 
lected. 

Deposit mone}" orders issued during the year had a total value of 
$1,143,225, and payments of deposit money orders during the same 
period aggregated $1,043,080. The balance on deposit to this account 
on June 30, 1920, was $520,070, as compared with $419,925 on deposit 
at the close of the previous year. On June 30, 1920, there were still 
open old postal savings accounts aggregating $509. The total amount 
on deposit at all post offices on June 30, 1920, including deposit money 
orders, old postal saAangs accounts, and unpaid fee-paid money orders 
in favor of the remitter, was $530,267.56, as compared with $437,- 
534.50 on June 30, 1919. 

Interest amounting to $7,987.08 was paid on deposit money orders 
cashed during the fiscal year, as compared with $8,604.24 for the year 
ended June 30, 1919. Interest received from banking institutions for 
money-order funds on deposit amounted to $22,141.38, thus leaving 
a net balance of $14,154.30 in the money-order interest account dur- 
ing the fiscal year. 

REGISTERED, INSURED, AND C. O. D. MAIL. 

In the registry division of the post offices 273,778 letters and par- 
cels were handled, as compared with 292,698 for the previous fiscal 
year. Of this number, 146,523 registers were dispatched, subdivided 
as follows: 28,779 domestic letters, 3,808 domestic parcels, 25,642 
foreign letters, 4,804 foreign parcels, 79,991 official letters and par- 
cels registered free, 88 c. o. d. parcels, and 3,411 domestic parcels 
insured. Compared with the preceding year, there was an increase 
of 10,168 registered letters and registered and insm-ed parcels dis- 
patched. 



260 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

There were delivered during the year at all post offices 104,728 
registered letters and 22,527 insured and c. o. d. packages, a total 
of 127,255, as compared witli 156,343 for the previous fiscal year. 
Balboa was designated as an exchange office for the receipt and dis- 
patch of registered and other matter for the west coast of Central 
and South America on November 1, 1919. iVncon, Balboa, and 
Cristobal, as exchange offices, handled 84,286 registered articles, a 
decrease of 167,243 from the previous year. Of these, 2,406 passed 
through the Ancon office, 6,937 through Balboa, and 74,943 through 
the Cristobal post office to and from foreign countries. This de- 
crease is accounted for b}^ the removal of censorship of mail matter 
which, during the war, necessitated the handling of all transit regis- 
tered matter through the post office at Cristobal. 

Approximately 80 per cent of the local registered mail received at 
Canal Zone post offices was mailed under official cover of The Panama 
Canal, Panama Railroad Company, and the United States Army 
and Navy for which no fees were paid. 

DUTIABLE PACKAGES. 

Customs duty was paid to the Republic of Panama to the amount 
of $33,452 on 14,302 mail parcels for nonemployees and on dutiable 
articles imported by employees, as compared with .$25,289.71 on 
9,591 parcels during the preceding year. During the year 16,226 
parcels were delivered at Canal Zone post offices on submission of 
form P. C. 1160, as compared with 14,640 during the previous year. 

DUPLICATE MONEY OKDERS AND INVESTIGATIONS. 

In addition to the direction and supervision of post offices and 
general correspondence pertaining thereto, the office of the director 
of posts issued 540 duplicates of lost or stolen money orders, investi- 
gated approximately 300 cases of the loss, rifling or nondelivery of 
registered, insured and c. o. d. mail, undertook special investiga- 
tions for the United States Post Office Department relative to mail 
in transit through the Canal Zone, made inspections of all post offices, 
and issued 70 numbered circulars of instructions to all postmasters. 

DEAD LETTER SECTION. 

All unclaimed mail matter of local origin is opened in the bureau 
of posts and disposed of in accordance with the Postal Laws and 
Regulations. Unclaimed first-class matter other than that mailed 
in the Canal Zone is returned by the dead letter section to the coun- 
try of origin for disposition. Unclaimed matter of other classes 
is disposed of by sale or, if of no value, destroyed. Insufficiently 
addressed letters are advertised in The Panama Canal Record and 
delivered, or returned to the senders. 

VIOLATIONS OF POSTAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS. 

During the year one case was reported of the misuse of canceled 
postage stamps. The case was not prosecuted for the reason that 
the identity of the sender of the letter on which the stamp was used 
could not be learned. 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 261 

There were five cases detected of the misuse of penalty envelopes, 
but no arrests were made in connection therewith. 

One arrest was made during the year for the rifling of ordinary 
letters by an employee. The ofi'ender was convicted on a charge of 
petit larceny and fined $5. 

One arrest was made for an attempt to open a mail box in the 
Ancon post office without proper authority, for which the ofi'ender 
was prosecuted on a charge of disorderly conduct, found guilty, and 
sentenced to pay a fine of $25 and to serve 30 days in jail. 

One arrest was made for the forgery of a name on a request for 
the free entry of a mail parcel in an attempt to secure the release of 
the parcel from a Canal Zone post office without thepayment of the 
proper customs duty to the Republic of Panama. The offender was 
arraigned in the magistrate's court, and ordered held for trial in the 
district court. The case was dismissed when it came up for trial in 
the higher court. 

DISPATCHES TO UNITED STATES AND OTHER COUNTRIES. 

During the fiscal year a total of 2,619 dispatches were made to 
100 different exchange offices by the post office at Cristobal, and 
1,076 dispatches were made to 40 different exchange offices by the 
post office at Balboa, which was designated as an exchange office 
for the west coast of South and Central America on November 1, 1919. 

DELIVERY OF MAIL TO SHIPS IN TRANSIT. 

The delivery of mail for crews and passengers of ships in transit 
through the Canal and for ships touching at Canal ports was continued 
during the past year \\dth certain modifications. Mail matter for 
vessels of certain steamship lines operating on a more or less regular 
schedule is delivered to the local agents of the line. Delivery of mail 
to all other vessels is effected directly to the vessel through boarding 
officers or pilots, upon arrival of ships at Cristobal or Balboa, and 
tlirough the Gatun and Pedro Miguel post offices while ships are in 
transit through the Canal. 

Boarding officers of the customs service are prepared to sell stamps, 
accept letters for registration, and take applications for money orders 
from passengers and crews of vessels in transit, issuing receipts in 
eaf'h case and transacting the business for them through Canal Zone 
post offices. 

UNITED STATES TRANSIT MAIL. 

Under arrangements entered into with the United States Postal 
Department in 1916 all transit United States mail and foreign closed 
mail destined to the west coast of Central and South America is 
consigned to the director of posts of the Canal Zone. Tliis arrange- 
ment continues to produ<"e most gratifying results both as to the more 
rapid onward dispatch of the mails and a very material economy in 
the cost of its transportation. In this connection, the follomng 
excerpt from the report of the Postmaster General for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1919, is quoted below: 

The arranojement which became effective November 1, 1916, whereby all mails 
dispatched from the United States for the west coast of South America via the Isthmus 
of Panama are consigned to the director of posts of the Canal Zone, who supervises 



262 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

their onward dispatch, continued to operate with gratifjdng results, and further 
reduced the cost of the Isthmus transit of United States mails, the cost for the fiscal 
year 1919 being $12,773.94, or $4,609.12 less than the cost for the fiscal vear 1918, and 
$94,820.51 less than the year 1916. 

Attention is called to tlie fact that by this arrjingement the cost of 
transportino; and handling transit United vStates mails at the Canal 
Zone for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1919, was .$136,958.98 less 
than in the year 1913, before the opening- of the Canal in 1914, although 
the volume of mail has in-^Teased. The figures for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1920, are not yet available. 

During the year ended June 30, 1920, there was received and dis- 
patched a total of 107,161 sa"ks of transit mail from New York and 
New Orleans, an increase of 16,070 sa-ks, or nearly 18 per cent over 
the ])revious fiscal year. Of this total 94,733 sacks originated in 
the United States, and 12,428 in foreign countries. This mail was 
received from 196 steamers, and was dispatched on 329 steamers. 
A total of 11,673 sacks was forwarded by rail to connecting steamers 
at Balboa, and of this total 10,466 originated in the United States 
and 1,207 in foreign countries. 

COUNT OF MAIL MATTER. 

A count of all mail matter received, dispatched, and handled in 
transit in the Canal Zone was made during the jieriod from October 
16, 1919, to November 15, 1919, in'dusive. During the same period 
all mail matter handled free under ''official business" frank was 
weighed. 

The result showed that 848,626 pieces of all classes of mail were 
handled, of which 325,040 were dispatched, 380,436 received, and 
143,150 handled in transit. 

Of the 325,040 pieces of mail matter dispatched, postage was paid 
on 157,275 ordinary letters, 26,252 cards, 14,412 papers and packages, 
4,444 registered letters, and 758 other pieces of registered mail, a 
total of 203,141 picves. The remaining 121,899 pieces of mail were 
dispatched under offi'ial frank, and included 106,631 ordinary letters, 
4,134 cards, 4,480 packages, 3,800 registered letters, and 2,854 
registered parcels. 

Of the 380,436 pieces of mail matter received, postage was ]>aid on 
176,438 ordinary letters, 94,748 other pieces of onhnary mail, 2,619 
registered letters, and 1,851 registered and insured parcels, a total 
of 275,656 pieces. The remaining 104,780 pieces were received imder 
official frank, and in luded 93,374 ordinary letters, 5,371 ordinary 
packages, 4,368 registered letters, and 1,667 registered and insured 
parcels. 

Mail matter in transit comprises all (Masses of mail matter received 
and dispat'-hed by the exchange offices at An"on and Cristobal to 
the cities of Panama and Colon, and to all countries in the Postal 
Union. Of the 143,150 pieces of mail matter handled in transit, 
postage was paid on 118,814 ordinary letters, 1,096 parcels, 17,197 
other pieces of second and tliird 'lass matter, and 4,569 registered 
pieces, a total of 141,676. The remaining 1,474 pieces of mail matter 
were received and dispat<'hed under official frank, and included 1,107 
ordinary letters, 53 parcels, and 314 pices of registered mail. 

Of the total of 848,626 pieces of mail handled, 228,153 pieces, or 
26 per cent, were handled under official frank without postage. 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 263 

Fifty-seven per cent of the local ordinary mail received at Canal 
Zone post offices, was official matter; and SO per cent of the local 
registered mail received at Canal Zone post offices was mailed under 
official frank. 

The total weight of official matter handled dm-ing the month, 
including letters, packages, and sacks, was 31,964 pounds 13 ouncea. 
The weight of the official letters and cards dispatched was 11,320 
pounds, and the weight of the official packages dispatched was 
20,644 pounds. Had postage been paid on the official matter dis- 
patched S3, 550.62 would have been collected on the letters and cards, 
$1,067.74 on the packages, and the registry fees on the registered 
matter dispatched would have amounted to $666.30, a total of 
$5,284.66. 

Bureau of Customs. 

The bureau of customs has been conducted under regulations 
embodied in Governor's Cbcular 679 of July 14, 1914, as revised on 
November 21, 1914. The work is closely allied to that of the marine 
division, the quarantine service, the division of police, and the 
Panama Railroad Company, and the bm'eau of customs cooperates 
with all these branches in order to avoid unnecessary duplication of 
work in connection with the handling of shipping and cargoes. 

MOVEMENTS OF VESSELS. 

There has been a large increase in shipping at Canal ports during 
the past year. The total number of vessels entered was 6,023, and 
the total number cleared was 6,016, as compared with 4,604 entered 
and 4,590 cleared during the previous fiscal year. 

The total number of American vessels entered was 2,779, and the 
total number of American vessels cleared was 2,778, as compared 
with 1,959 entered and 1,940 cleared during the fiscal year 1919. 

The increase in the total number of vessels entered during the 
year — an increase of approximately 118 per month or almost four a 
day — has resulted in a large increase in the work of the customs force. 

MERCHANDISE FOR REPUBLIC OF PANAMA. ^_ 

All merchandise arriving at Cristobal and Balboa, destined to 
persons or firms in the Republic of Panama not connected with The 
Panama Canal, the Panama Railroad Company, or the United States 
Army or Navy, is in the custody of the Canal Zone customs until 
submission of the necessary papers from Panaman officials showing 
that duty has been paid. Permits for 6,635 releases were granted 
at Cristobal during the year, and 48 releases were authorized at 
Balboa, where the greater part of such cargo is forwarded by railroad 
to Panama City, there to be taken in charge by the Panaman customs 
officials. 

FREE ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE. 

Prior to September 8, 1919, after requests for free entry on Form 
P. C. 164 had been approved by this office for the executive secretary, 
final approval was given by Panaman customs officials in Colon, but 
now they are finally approved by the secretary of finance and 
treasury of the Republic of Panama. During the fiscal year 1920 the 
number of requests accomplished was 1,461, as compared viith. 1,128 
for the previous year. 



264 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

ATTEMPTED SMUGGLING. 

There were two arrests during the year for attempted smuggHng. 
In one case the defendant was found guilty and fined $20, and in the 
other case a demiu-rer was filed by the attorney for the defendant 
claiming that no violation of the Canal Zone laws had been com- 
mitted inasmuch as no customs duties are collected in the Canal 
Zone, and that, if any violation of the law had been committed, it 
was against the laws of the Republic of Panama. The demurrer was 
sustained by the court and the case dismissed. The question of 
legislation to meet this situation is now under consideration. 

OPIUM TRAFFIC. 

No attempts to smuggle opium through the Canal Zone into the 
Republic of Panama were detected by employees of the bureau of 
customs during the year. 

HOUSEHOLD INSPECTIONS. 

Under an agreement wdth the United States Treasury Department 
the bureau of customs is authorized to inspect and seal miscellaneous 
goods of American manufacture and household effects which have 
been pm-chased and used abroad for more than one year belonging 
to employees of The Panama Canal, the Panama Railroad Company, 
and the United States Government, which are intended for shipment 
by freight to the United States. These goods are then admitted into 
the United States free of duty without further inspection. There 
have been 288 such inspections during the fiscal year, covering 1,550 
pieces of freight, as compared with 583 inspections and 4,467 pieces 
of freight in 1919. 

As this particular inspection service is only for the pm'pose of 
assisting employees in returning household goods to the United 
States, and is of no real or incidental advantage to the bureau of 
customs, Panama Canal Circular 679-7 was issued under date of 
June 21, 1919, directing that, effective July 1, 1919, in addition to 
the charge of $1 for declaration of inspected household goods, a 
charge of SI per hour should be made for the time spent by customs 
inspectors away from their regular duties on the inspection of house- 
hold goods. During the year the sum of $557 was collected for the 
time devoted to the inspection of household goods by the customs 
inspectors at Balboa, and $356.50 for the time of customs inspectors 
at Cristobal while engaged on this work. 

The decreased number of inspections during the year, as compared 
with the number for 1919, is due to the fact that post supply officers 
of the United States Army on the Isthmus were authorized, efl'ective 
October 30, 1919, to make such inspections of goods intended for 
shipment by freight to the United States by Army officers. 

CERTIFICATION OF INVOICES. 

The bureau of customs certifies invoices covering ordinary ship- 
ments from the Canal Zone to the United States, using forms identical 
with those prescribed for certification by American consuls in foreign 
ports. Including the invoices for household inspections, above 



EEPORT OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 265 

mentioned, there were 1,420 invoices thus certified during the year, 
as compared with 1,323 in 1919. Fees for this service amounted to 
$240 at Balhoa, and to $461 at Cristobal Invoices for the Panama 
Raih-oad Company and departments of The Panama Canal are certi- 
fied without charge. 

SPECIAL CUSTOMS SERVICE. 

In order to facilitate the discharge of passengers from vessels after 
the usual working hours and on Sundays and holidays at the terminal 
ports of the Canal, Circular 679-8 was issued by tlie Governor under 
date of August 7, 1919, providing that,-effective September 1, 1919: 

1. The bureau of customs shall furnish customs inspectors for inspection of passen- 
gers' baggage between the hours of 6 p. m. and 7 a. m. and on Sundays and holidays 
only upon the request of the master or authorized agent of any vessel calling at the 
ports of Balboa and Cristobal. 

2. A charge will be made for such service against the vessel for which the service is 
rendered on the basis of .$5 for each customs inspector engaged between the hours of 
6 p. m. and 11 p. m., or fraction thereof, on any work day, and $10 for each inspector 
engaged after 11 p. m. ; and for service on Sundays and holidays a charge of $10 will 
be made for each inspector engaged between the hours of 7 a. m. and 6 p. m. and 6 p. m. 
and 11 p. m. 

3. The number of customs inspectors who may be required to inspect passengers' 
baggage of any vessel ■wall be determined by the chief customs inspectors, or desig- 
nated subordinate officers, based on their information and knowledge of the require- 
ments. 

Since the above-mentioned circular became effective, there has 
been collected from vessels requesting such special service the sum 
of S830 at Balboa and the sum of $2,105 at Cristobal. 

PROHIBITED ALIENS. 

Panama Canal Circular 714-1, of April 25, 1917, charges the 
bureau of customs with the exclusion of Chinese from the Canal 
Zone. During the fiscal year, 363 Chinese arrived as passengers at 
Balboa and 127 at Cristobal in transit to the Republic of Panama 
and other countries, making a total of 490, as compared with 251 
for the previous fiscal year. Of this number 184 were admitted to 
the Republic of Panama by authority of that Government, and the 
others, with the exception of nine awaiting transportation at the 
end of the year, either proceeded on their journej^ or were returned 
to the port of embarkation. Chinese in transit can make arrange- 
ments to be released in the Canal Zone under bond, and 97 such bonds 
were accepted at the port of Balboa, and 7 at the port of Cristobal, 
during the year. 

Chinese crews are also checked before a ship leaves a Canal Zone 
port, in order to see that no illegal landings have been made, and 379 
crews have been so checked during the year, as compared with 324 
for the previous fiscal year. 

The number of prohibited alien passengers handled was almost 
double, and 55 more Chinese crews were checked during the year than 
during the previous fiscal year. 

Shipping Commissioner. 

The chief of the division of civil affairs is also shipping commis- 
sioner, and the chief customs inspectors are deputy shipping corn- 
missioners. According to law the shipping commissioner and his 



266 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

deputies have the same powers as shipping commissioners in United 
States ports and American consuls in foreign ports with respect to 
American seamen. 

The ports of the Canal have a peculiar status, as under some circum- 
stances they are considered American ports, and under others they 
are considered foreign ports, w^hich makes it necessary for the ship- 
ping conmissioner and deputy shipping commissioners in the Canal 
Zone to be familiar with the duties of American consuls in foreign 
ports and shipping commissioners in American ports. 

The shipping commissioner and his deputies supervise the signing 
on and signing off of all Amei'ican seamen (i. e., seamen on American 
vessels) engaged or discharged in the Canal Zone, including the 
payment of the wages of such seamen, the approval of allotments, 
deductions, fines, and claims for overtime; receive wages of deceased 
and deserting seamen for deposit and proper disposition according 
to law; procure seamen for vessels at Canal Zone ports; discharge for 
hospital treatment sick and injured seamen and attend to their 
maintenance and return to the United States after their discharge 
from the hospital ; maintain and return to the United States destitute 
American seamen found in the Canal Zone and also those sent to the 
Canal Zone by American consuls for shipment to the United States; 
take charge of the wages and effects of deceased seamen and make 
disposition thereof according to law: keep a register of the names 
and characters of seamen; supervise the operation of the seamen's 
institutes which are conducted by the Salvation Army at Balboa and 
Cristobal, and arrange for the care and subsistence of seamen at 
these institutions; inspect the log books, crew lists, and shipping 
articles of vessels to see that the provisions of law have been carried 
out; prepare shipping articles and extend and amend them; investi- 
gate complaints of seamen against the officers of vessels and oi 
officers of vessels against seamen; and arbitrate disputes and dis- 
agreements with regard to the provisioning of vessels, conditions of 
employment, treatment, wages, advances and allotments, conduct 
of seamen, and all other differences between officers and seamen 
which may arise. 

The increase of 820 American vessels entered and 838 cleared from 
Canal Zone ports dming the present j^ear, as compared with the year 
1919 — more than two each day — has created a great deal of addi- 
tional work. There were 4,281 seamen shipped on American vessels 
and 3,278 seamen discharged, as compared with 4,182 sliipped and 
3,453 discharged during the preceding year. There were 624 
American seamen lodged or subsisted in the Canal Zone during the 
year. Of this number, 288 were returned to the United States at the 
expense of the appropriation for the relief of destitute American 
seamen, and the remaining 336 were signed on vessels as seamen or 
workaways and returned to the United States without expense to 
the Government. 

During the year the total amount of wages earned by seamen who 
were discharged at Canal Zone ports amounted to .1378,460.35; the 
amount approved for deduction on account of advances, allotments, 
fines, slop chest account, etc., was .1106,781.66, and $271,678.69 was 
either paid to sc^amen under the su])ervision of the deputy shipping 
commissioners or received on deposit for the seamen by the deputy 
shipping commissioners. The wages and effects of 13 American 



BEPOET OF EXECUTIVE SECRETABY. 267 

seamen who^dicd in Canal Zone hospitals were handled during the 
year and remitted to the proper courts in the United States. 

Until July 1, 1919, this work was performed by customs inspectors 
in the bureau of customs. Due to the increase in the work and the 
lack of customs force to perform it, the bureau of the shipping com- 
missioner was created by the Governor, effective on the above date, 
in accordance with section 9 of the Executive order of January 27, 
1914, which reads as follows: 

9. The duties herein prescribed for the foregoing departments, offices, and agencies 
will be assigned to di^dsions or bureaus thereunder by the Governor of The Panama 
Canal, as the necessities therefor arise. Each of the foregoing departments shall 
discharge such further duties as may be assigned to it from time to time by the Gover- 
nor; and the Governor, \vith the approval of the President, may transfer from time to 
time specific duties from one department to another. 

This bureau has an authorized personnel of 14 men, who are desig- 
nated as deputy shipping commissioners and boarding officers. 

Administration of Estates. 

Dm'ing the year 258 estates of deceased and insane employees of 
The Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad Company were ad- 
ministered, as compared with 161 estates during 1919, and there were 
26 estates in course of settlement on June 30, 1920. 

Of the 258 estates settled during the year 148 were delivered to 
the consular or diplomatic representatives in the Republic of Panama 
or the United States of the countries of which the deceased or insane 
persons were citizens or subjects; 55 estates were settled direct with 
heirs, upon satisfactory evidence of hehship being furnished; 7 estates 
were settled with guardians of heirs; 3 estates were settled with 
administrators; 5 estates were delivered to insane employees who 
recovered their sanity; 4 estates were delivered to dependent rela- 
tives of insane persons for their maintenance and support; and the 
net proceeds of 36 estates were used to settle claims against them. 
No estates were escheated during the fiscal year, but a petition for 
the escheat of one estate was pending in the district court on June 
30, 1920. 

The amount involved in the settlement of the 258 estates was 
$16,314.77, of which $15,446.87 belonged to decedents' estates and 
$867.90 to the estates of insane persons. 

In addition to the 26 estates remaining unsettled on June 30, 1920, 
12 additional cases were being investigated in which no money or 
property had yet been received. 

There is attached hereto a statement showing the number of 
estates received and settled during each month of the year, including 
the amount of funds handled, together with a statement giving the 
number, by nationalities, of the estates of deceased and insane 
employees settled during the fiscal year. 

Paragraph 571 of the tariff act of October 3, 1913, on imports into 
the United States, provides for the free entry of "personal effects, 
not merchandise, of citizens of the United States dying in foreign 
countries." As a result of correspondence during the year with the 
United States Treasury Department regarding shipments of personal 
effects of deceased American employees from the Canal Zone to the 
United States, the collectors of customs at New York and New 
Orleans have been instructed by that department that such effects 



268 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

may be passed without examination, free of customs duty, provided 
they are accompanied by a certificate signed by the Canal Zone 
ofTicer who supervises the packing of the effects to the effect that the 
packages were packed under his personal supervision and contain 
nothing but personal articles which were the property of the deceased 
employee, and that the decedent, at the time of his death, was a 
citizen of the United States. 

Licenses and Permits. 

^ Motor vehicle and bicycle licenses were issued by the division of 
civil affairs, as well as permits for hunting and ' the keeping and 
carrying of firearms and the peddling of foodstuffs. During the 
fiscal year there were 3,898 such licenses and permits issued, oJf 
which 1,780 were for motor vehicles, 792 for bicycles, 723 for hunting 
and the keeping or carrying of firearms, and 603 for the peddling of 
foodstuffs. Agreements are in force with the municipalities of 
Panama and Colon providing for reduced reciprocal license fees on 
motor vehicles. The sum of $10,748.05 was collected by this office 
during the past year for license fees, as compared with $7,681.94 in 
the previous year. 

The duty of issuing permits for hunting and the keeping and 
carrying of firearms was transferred to the police and fire division 
effective July 1, 1920. 

Insurance Companies and Corporations. 

Correspondence with insurance companies licensed to do business 
in the Canal Zone is handled by this office for the executive secretar}^ 
and the annual report of insurance business transacted in the Canal 
Zone during the calendar year is made up by this office. The seven 
insurance companies which were licensed to transact business during 
the previous fiscal year renewed their licenses during the fiscal year 
1920. One other company, which was formerly licensed to do busi- 
ness in the Canal Zone and which still has insurance in force here, 
is required to keep securities on deposit and to pay the insurance 
tax of H per cent on the gross premium receipts collected by it in 
the Canal Zone. There is attached hereto a statement giving a 
summary of the insurance business transacted in the Canal Zone 
during the calendar year 1919, taken from sworn statements con- 
tained in the annual reports of the companies licensed to do business 
here. 

The division of civil affairs handles for the executive secretary 
correspondence relating to foreign corporations which do business 
or desire to do business in the Canal Zone, under the provisions of 
the Executive order of March 20, 1913. The one corporation which 
was authorized to do business in the Canal Zone July 1, 1919, 
renewed its license during the year. Two other corporations were 
licensed to do ])usiness during the je&T. 
Respectfully, 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 

Executive Secretary, 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. 



EEPOET OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 



269 



Table No. 1. — Vessels entered and cleared, seamen shipped and discharged, and seamen 
lodged, subsisted, and repatriated, fiscal year 1920. 





Vessels entered. 


Vessels cleared. 


Seamen shipped. 




Bal- 
boa. 


Cris- 
tobal. 


Total. 


Bal- 
boa. 


Cris- 
tobal. 


Total. 


Bal- 
boa. 


Cris- 
tobal. 


Total. 


1')1>I. 


227 
228 
192 
215 
200 
282 

273 
245 
260 
242 
250 
219 


244 
244 
214 
241 
233 
323 

316 
295 
282 
278 
269 
251 


471 
472 
406 
456 
433 
605 

589 
540 
542 
520 
519 
470 


224 
231 
186 
220 
195 
285 

269 
245 
262 
242 


250 
237 
211 
239 
230 
322 

310 
286 
292 
285 


474 
468 
397 
459 
425 
607 

579 
531 
554 
527 
525 
470 


Ill 
106 
63 
177 
112 
152 

132 
91 

120 

176 
84 

147 


239 
277 
138 
129 
211 
253 

311 
323 
230 
170 
312 
217 


350 


August . . 


383 


September... 


201 


October 


306 


November 


323 


December . 


405 


1920. 
.Tanuarv 


443 


February. . 


414 


March 


350 


April 


346 


Mav 


252 


273 


396 


.Tune 


220 1 250 


364 






Total 


2,833 


3,190 


6,023 


2,831 


3,185 


6,016 


1,471 


2,810 


4,281 








Seam 


en discb 


irged. 


Seamen lodged, sub- 
sisted, and repatri- 
ated. 


Seamen repatriated at 
expense of United 

States. 




Bal- 
boa. 


Cris- 
tobal. 


Total. 


Bal- 
boa. 


Cris- 
tobal. 


Total. 


Bal- 
boa. 


Cris- 
tobal. 


Total. 


1919. 
July 


24 
60 
51 

143 
93 

132 

93 

36 
241 

69 
129 

77 


186 
169 
88 
96 
141 
230 

260 
201 
115 
201 
295 
148 


210 
229 
139 
239 
234 
362 

353 
237 
356 
270 
424 
225 


is' 

26 
13 

31 
29 
51 
21 
14 
20 


25 
30 
27 
30 
13 
16 

52 
39 
43 
46 
37 
46 


25 
30 
27 
45 
39 
29 

83 
68 
94 
67 
51 
66 


2 

1 

13 
2 
1 

7 
3 
1 


11 
9 
5 
14 
12 
13 

48 
23 
36 
29 
36 
22 


11 


.\ugust 


9 


September 


5 


October 


14 


November 


14 


December 


14 


1920. 
Januarv 


61 


February 


25 


March 


37 


.\pril 


36 


Mav 


39 


June 


23 






Total 


1,148 


2,130 


3,278 


220 


404 


624 


30 


258 


288 











Tabt-e Xo. 2. — Number of estates of deceased and insane employees, by nationalities, 
settled by administrator of estates during fiscal year ended June 30, 1920. 



Native of— 


Deceased. 


Insane. 


Total. 


Chile .. 




1 


1 


Colombia . 


is 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 

"2 

34 
3 
1 

15 
1 

149 

1 
2 

16 


13 


Costa Rica 




2 


France 




1 






1 


Guatemala 




1 


Haiti. . 




3 






2 


Panama 




34 


Peru 




3 


Spain 


1 
2 

8 


2 


United States 


17 


Vene/'.uela . 


1 


West Indies: 

British 


157 


Danish 


1 


Dutch 


2 


French . 


1 


17 






Total 


245 


13 


258 







270 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



Table No. 3. — Number of estates received and settled, and amount of funds handled, 
during fiscal xjear ended June 30, 1920. 



Month. 



Balance of unsettled estates on hand on July 1, 1919, 
and amount collected in same 



July 

August. . . . 
September. 

October 

November. 
December. . 



1920. 



January.. 
February . 
March . . . 

April 

May 

June 



Total estates and cash handled . 



Number 
received. 



Number 
settled. 



.\ mount 
of funds 
collected. 



i, 758. 27 



873. 99 
664.44 
1,346.05 
2,388.78 
721.70 
819. 15 



479.17 
208. 98 
649. 82 
2, 426. 50 
1,274.54 
527. 79 



21,139.18 



^"alue 
of estates 
settled. 



54,362.78 

952. 84 

1,845.71 

1,736.88 

1,562.70 



1,018.49 
1,464.63 

581. 74 
1,349.10 
1, 120. 83 

319.07 



16,314.77 



Number of unsettled estates on hand June 30, 1920 26 

Amount collected in unsettled estates on hand June 30, 1920 S4,824. 41 

Table No. 4. — Number of mail parcels released free of duty, number on which duty has 
been paid to the Government of Panama, and the amount of duty as shown by receipts 
on file, by offices, during the fiscal year ended June SO, 1920. 



Name of post office. 



Number 

admitted 

free of 

duty. 



Niunber 

on which 

duty was 

paid. 



Amount 
of duty. 



Ancon 

Balboa 

Balboa Heights. 

Corozal 

Coco Solo 

Cristobal 

Culebra 

Empire 

Fort Amador... 
Fort Randolph. 
Fort Sherman . . 

Gamboa 

Gatun 

Monte Llrio. . .. 

Paraiso 

Pedro Miguel... 

Total 



2,525 

4,164 

1,872 

614 

58 

4,491 

260 

115 

368 

81 

124 

61 

857 



7,996 

321 

14 

25 



$18,073.23 
534. 83 
63. 42 
111.02 



5,816 
36 



14,463.53 
16.85 



45.00 



120. 78 



24 
612 



14.72 
8.62 



16,226 



Table No. 5. — Number of insured and C. 0. D. parcel-post parcels and registered articles 
delivered, by offices, during fiscal year ended June SO, 1920. 



Name of post office. 


Number 
of insiu-ed 

and 
C. 0. D. 
parcels. 


Number of 
registered 
articles. 


Total. 




5,352 

2,587 

3,145 

821 

740 

5,977 

383 


16,757 
8,836 

19, 498 
3,399 
1,575 

32,647 
1,464 
1,320 
1,268 
349 
429 
2,431 
6, 424 


22,109 


Balboa 


11,423 




22,643 




4,220 




2,315 




38,624 




1,847 




1,320 




730 
189 

285 


1,998 




538 




714 




2,431 




1,034 


7,458 








145 
1,1.39 


2,007 
6,324 


2,152 


Pedro Miguel.' 


7,463 


Total 


22,527 


104,728 


127,255 







EEPOKT OP EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 



271 



Table No. ('i. — Letters and parcels registered and insured, by offices, durimi the fiscal 

year ended June SO, 1920. 



Name of post oflite. 


Domestic 
letters 
regis- 
tered. 


Domestic 
parcels 
regis- 
tered. 


Foreign 
letters 
regis- 
tered. 


Foreign 
parcels 
regis- 
tered. 


Official 
regis- 
tered 
free. 


Insured 

and 
C. 0. D. 


Total. 




7,291 

3,734 

1, 796 

958 

1,560 

9,819 

566 

200 

424 

113 

187 

275 

921 

12 

115 

808 


1,312 

248 

124 

606 

50 

1,124 

14 

50 

11 

56 

8 


7, 595 

1,473 

194 

182 

15 

14, 770 

145 

24 

98 

1 

21 

195 

176 

31 

234 

488 


2,375 
80 
22 
40 

""'2,' 224' 


4, 4.58 

3,779 

48,836 

613 

300 

11,984 

885 

100 

178 

76 

70 

- 1,137 

3,622 

31 

1,1N2 

2,740 


531 
758 
22} 
23 
189 
GOO 
334 


23,562 




10,072 


Balboa Heights 


51,196 


Corozal 


2,4 22 




2,114 


Cristobal . 


40, 52! 




1,944 






374 


Fort Amador . 


7 


297 
51 

231 

2 

49 


1,015 




297 






517 






1,C09 


Gatun 


192 


38 

3 

15 


4,998 




74 






13 
197 


1,-547 


Pedro Miguel 


is 


4,261 






Total 


28, 779 


3,808 


25,642 


4,804 


79,991 


3,499 


146,523 







Table No. 7. — Number and amount of monei/ orders issued, and amount of money on 
deposit at post offices, bi/ offices, as reported by postmaMers , for fiscal year ended June 
30, 1920. 



Name of post office. 



Ancon 

Balboa 

Balboa Heights. 

Corozal '. 

Coco Solo 

Cristobal 

Culebra 

Empire! 

Fort Amador... 
Fort Randolph. 
Fort Sherman.. 

Gamboai 

Gatun 

Monte Lirio 1 . . . 

Paraiso 

Pedro Miguel . . . 



Total. 



Number of 
orders. 



27, 555 
25,064 
9,987 
2,984 
1,629 
37,140 
2,590 



1,541 
398 
623 



7,368 



1,598 

7,187 



Amount. 



$614,616.44 

831,370.59 

262, 288. 73 

79,531.40 

44,604.28 

862,211.02 

55, 178. 58 



.50, 710. 95 
10,604.60 
21,392.42 



164,784.30 



21,811.39 
179,746.14 



'3,198,850.84 



Fees. 



§2,113.11 
2,115.63 
888. 88 
201.80 
164.92 
3,212.44 
172. 50 



107. 01 
29. IS 
48.04 



510. 50 



S4.42 
511.38 



* 10, 192. 81 



Amount of unpaid 
money orders June 30. 



Deposit. Fee paid 



$105,230.00 

165, 785. 00 

39,3''^0 00 

7, 005. 00 

2,410.00 

111,800 00 

7,300.00 



6,0''.5.00 

205 00 

2,505.00 



31,530.00 



4,575.00 
30, 830. 00 



6 514,620.00 



?115 50 
165 GO 



,025. CO 
61. CO 



310.06 



12.00 



9,688.56 



1 Not money order office. 

2 Figures taken from advices by postmasters and include spoiled and canceled orders, 
show 125,123. 

3 Figm-es taken from advices by postmasters. Auditor's records show .53.199.99(.98. 
* Figures taken from advices by postmasters. Auditor's records show 810,207.59. 

6 Figures taken from advices by postmasters. Auditor's records show .5520,070. 



Auditor's records 



272 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Table No. S.— Receipts. 



Interest on deposit money order funds 

Sales of posta.^o stamps and other stamped paper 

Second-class miil 

Money-order fees 

Paniin I Railroad raiil 

Handling miil between Panama and Colon for Republic of Panama 

Handling of United States transit mail and credit from other departments of 

the Government 

Box rents 

Miscellaneous receiots ■ 



136,627.42 



1920 



$25, 740. 20 


$22,141.38 


81,313.78 


87,096.72 


2,553.88 


1,782.53 


10, 426. 16 


10,207.59 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 


600.00 


I 1,075.00 


4,175.93 


4,700.19 


8,268.20 


8,776.55 


2,313.25 


751.64 



138,391.60 



1 Also includes payments from the Republic ol Panama for the handling of mail for South and Central 
America at the Balboa exchange post oi^ce. 

2 Includes credits from other Departments of the Government. 

Table No. 9. — Surnmary of insurance business transacted in the Canal Zone during the 

calendar year 1919. 

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



Number. Amount 



Policies in force Dec. 31, 1918 

Policies issued during 1919 

Policies lapsed during 1919 

Policies in force Dec. 31, 1919 

Los.ses and claims incurred during 1919 

Losses and claims settled during 1919 

Losses and claims unpaid Dec. 31, 1919 

Premiums collected by life insurance companies during 1919. 



225 
54 

659 
1 
2 
1 



8872,251.00 

808, 443. 00 

105,649.00 

1,375,045.00 

1,000.00 

3,000.00 

1,000.00 

50, 449. 95 



MISCELLANEOUS INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



Premiums 
received 
in 1919. 



Losses 

paid in 

1919. 



Accident 

Auto and teams property damage 

Burglary and theft 

Fidelity 

Health 

Liability 

Surety 

Workman's compensation 

Totol 



$12, 171. 86 

1 28. 27 

' 102. 60 

31.3. 18 

918. 46 

2,567.57 

4,50.5.13 

557. 89 



20, 903. 22 



$2, 721. 92 



1,089.36 
325. 11 
379.29 



10.98 



4,526.56 



1 Return premiums. 

Table No. 10. — Surplus of postal receipts over expenditures if 40 per cent subsidy on 
stamp sales had not been paid to Republic of Panama and if postage had been paid on 
official inatter which luas carried free during Jiscal year 1920. 

Actual postal revenues $138, 391. 60 

Estimated loss in postal receipts due to official matter being carried free, based on 
actual count of mail for 1 month— $5,281.66 per month for 12 months 63, 415. 92 

Total $201,807.52 

Expenditures for salaries and wages 98, 744. 88 

Expenditures for other than salaries and wages less 40 per cent subsidy on stamp 
sales amounting to $33,783.97 32,883.78 

Total 131 , 628. 66 

Surplus receipts over expenditures 70, 178. 86 

Total 201,807.52 



APPENDIX G. 
EEPORT OF THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY FOR THE CANAI ZONE. 



Ancon, Canal Zone, July 1, 1920. 

Sir: There is attached hereto a tabulated statement of all criminal 
prosecutions in the district court of the Canal Zone for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1920. 

There was a total of 500 cases disposed of in the district court, 
with the results shown in the table. 

Of the criminal cases pending at the beginning of the fiscal year 
1919-20, all have been disposed of except the two charges against 
E. F. Bataille arising out of the failure of the Continental Banking 
& Trust Company, which have been referred to in previous reports at 
length. Warrants of extradition granted by the Governors of New 
Jersey and New York are still in the hands of the Department of 
Justice. 

In addition to these 2 cases, there were 18 other cases pending at 
the close of the fiscal year, 13 of which had been continued by the 
court and 5 of which had not been set for trial. 

There were four applications for writs of habeas corpus during the 
year, as follows : 

Maxim Ford. 
Ormond Donawa. 
Ashton Mottley. 
John Neverson. 

Maxim Ford was a fugitive from justice from the State of Massa- 
chusetts and was apprehended on the Canal Zone. Upon presenta- 
tion of a request for extradition by the Governor of Massachusetts 
and the granting of the same by the Governor of The Panama Canal, 
Ford sued out a vnAi of habeas corpus and was released on bail 
pending a hearing on the return of the writ. Before a hearing could 
be had the petitioner left the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone and has 
not as yet been apprehended. 

The remaining three writs of habeas corpus were granted to peti- 
tioners whose deportation had been ordered hj the Governor of 
The Panama Canal. The Donawa case was dismissed of record by 
agreement of the petitioner and the district attorney. No hearing 
has been had as yet on the other writs. 

The following civil cases were disposed of during the j^ear: 

Medrano de Idiaquez v. Mauremus Petersen et al.: This was a libel in admiralty 
for the recovery of ?2,323.20 in gold coin which had been seized while aboard a vessel 
for an alleged .dolation of the provisions of the espionage act. It was the contention 
of the Government that Idiaquez was attempting to export gold coin in \'iolation of 
.the act. Idiaquez was tried before a jury in Septeml)er, 1918, and found not guilty. 
A libel in admiralty was then instituted to seciire the return of the property in ques- 
tion. After a hearing on the pleadings the court ordered the coin returned to the 
libellant. 

Jose Fernandez v. W. B. Meares, jr.: This was a suit for damages arising out of a 
collision between an automobile driven by the plaintiff and a Government car driven 
by the defendant. Inasmuch as the defendant was engaged in the performance of 

8847—20 18 273 



274 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

his official duties at the time of the accident, the district attorney defended the snit 
at the reqiiest of the Governor of The Panama (Janal. Trial was had before the court 
without a jury and judgment foi' plaintiff rendered in the siun of ?125 and costs. 

Jose H. Stilson v. Santiago Samudio: The plaintiff in this action instituted a suit 
for a foreclosure of an al!os:ed mortgage against the defendant. A decree in fore- 
closure was rendered and execution was hid thereon. The marshal of the (]anal 
Zone leA-ied upon and sold as the property of Samudio certain lands situated within 
the Camacho watershed which had I'een in the possession of the United States since 
1905. Prior to the confirmation of the sale the district attorney filed a suggestion on 
hehilf of the Government, setting forth that the lands in question were owned by the 
United States Government and could not 1~e levied upon and sold as the property of 
the defendant. After a hearing u])on the motion to confirm the sale and tlie sugges- 
tion of tho district attorney, the court ordered the sale confirmed and the deed of the 
marshal to issue. 

The following civil cases were pending at the close of the fiscal 
year: 

David Osborne r. Charles Hill: This is an action for trespass, alleging false imprisoii- 
ment and malicious prosecution. The defendant is a Zone police officer, and the 
district attorney is representing him at the request of the Governor of The Panama 
Canal. The issues are joined and the case is ready for trial. 

Charles Hinds v. J. H. Farquharson: This is an action similar to the Osborne v. 
Hill case and is now awaiting trial. 

Luis Reina v. Panama Railroad Company: This is an action by the plaintiff to 
establish his interest in certain real estate which the defendants contend is owned 
bv the United States Government and has been in its possession for a number of years. 
The district attorney filed a suggestion on behalf of the United States setting xip the 
ownership and possession of the United States. To this suggestion the plaintiff filed 
certain exceptions, which were disallowed by the coiut. No answer has as yet been 
filed to the suggestion, nor has the court ruled upon the Government's motion to 
dismiss the action. 

John F. Mountain v. Chester Harding. Governor of The Panama Canal: The plain- 
tiff in this suit secured from the court a temporary injunction restraining defendant 
from suspending plaintiff's license as a pilot in Canal Zone waters. The defendant 
made a return to the writ asking that the temporary injimction be dissolved. The 
suit is pending awaiting an answer to the return of the writ. 

Louise Bennett v. Panama Railroad Company et al.: This is an action for dam- 
ages in the sum of §5.000 on account of personal injuries sustained by reason of a bal- 
cony falling at house 406 Colon Beach, occupied as Panama Railroad employees' 
quarters, and where plaintiff was employed as a servant. After the filing of the origi- 
nal complaint plaintiff petitioned the court for leave to join the chief quartermaster 
of The Panama Canal as a partv defendant. This petition was granted by the court, 
and the cause is awaiting the filing of answers by the defendants. 

The following admiralty cases were disposed of during the year: 

Houlder, ]\fiddleton & Co. (Ltd.) v. Chester Harding. Governor of The Panama 
Canal: The libellant asked damages in the sum of ?5r),000 for injuries alleged to have 
been sustained by the steamship Laularo during transit of the Canal on August 25, 
1916. A demurrer was filed to the bill of the libellant, Init before hearing was had 
thereon the libellant dismi.ssed the bill on his own motion. 

The following admiralty cases are pending: 

Leopold Falk et al. v. Steamship Olockson and the United States Shipping Board 
Emergency Fleet Corporation : This is a libel bv the master and crew of the tug 
Gorgona as salvors of the ste.unship OlnrJcson. The defendant steamship is owned 
by ithe United States Shipping P>oard Emergency Fleet (.'orporation and in March, 
1920. was reported as being on fire at sea. The tug Corgonn, owned by The Pan- 
ama r'anal. put to sea and assisted in bringing the Olockson into the port of Balboa, 
where the fire was extinguished. Libellants ask for reasonalde salvage compensation, 
for the assistance rendered to the defendant steamship. 

Halvor Huun et al. v. the United States of America, owner of the launch Tuho- 
guilla: The TahogviUa is a lauiuffi belonging to The I'anama Canal. In May, 1920, 
the launch was sighted at s(;a l)y the .steamship Conrad Mohr. Tht^ engines of the 
launch h.ul T>roken down an<l ha<l not been ot)eratirg for a jieriod of several hours. 
The seven passengers were taken aboard the ('onrail Mnhr and the launch was towed 
to the port of Ball)oa. Reasonable salvage compensarion for the assistance rendered 
the launch is asked by the libellants. 



REPORT OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 
Criminal prosecutions, 1919-20. 



275 



Assault 

Assault and battery 

Assault with deadly weapon 

Assault with intent to com- 
mit rape. 

Assault with intent to com- 
mit rape on minor cliild. 

Assault with intent to com- 
mit infamous crime 
against nature. 

Assault with intent to kill.. 

Automobile regulations, 
violation of. 

Automobile and coach tariff 
regulations, violation of. 

Battery 

Bigamy 

Burglary 

Buying Government prop- 
erty from a soldier. 

(Carrying concealed weapon . 

Conspiracy 

Contempt of court 

Customs regulations, vio- 
lation of. 

Cruelty to animals 

Deportation, returning to 
Canal Zone. 

Disorderly conduct 

Disturbing the peace 

Drunk and disorderly 

Embezzlement 

Embezzlement in the State 

of Wyoming. 

Escaping from prison 

Executive Order No. 26, 

violation of. 
Exhibiting deadly weapon. 
False pretenses and cheats . 
Fighting 

Forgery 

Fraud 

Gambling 

Grand larceny 

Incest 

Infamous crime against na- 
ture. 

Intoxication 

Libel 

Liquor regulations, viola- 
tion of. 

Loitering 

Lottery laws, violation of. . 

Manslaughter 

Mayhem 

Murder 

Mutiny 

National prohibition act, 

violation of. 
Navigation laws, violation 

of. 

Nonsupport 

Obtaining money under 

false pretenses. 
Obstructing an officer 



29 



23 

1 

2 
1 

34 11 



Disposed of otherwise. 



1 demurrer sustained, dis- 
missed. 

fl bail forfeited 

12 

1 

1 

1 



1 nol. pros 

1 appeal withdrawn. 



1 appeal withdrawn. 



[17 nol. pros. 
4 



1 demurrer sustained, dis- 
missed. 



1 nol. pros 

2 demurrers sustained, dis- 

missed. 

6 appeals withdrawn 

1 appeal withdrawn 



4 nol. pros 

1 returned to United States 



1 demurrer sustained, dis- 
missed. 

1 nol. pros 

4 nol. pros 



r2nol. pros. 
2 



[34 nol. pros. 
1 nol. pros.. 
17. 



2 information withdrawn. 
[3 bail forfeited 



2 nol. pros 

1 appeal withdrawn. 



[1 bail forfeited . 

^1 nol. pros 

|1 nol. pros 

II bail forfeited. 



1 information not filed. 



Remarks. 



1 assault. 

1 assault and battery. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



To asylum. 

1 guilty; new trial, not guilty. 



1 guilty; sentence suspended, 

dismissed. 
3 petit larceny; 1 disorderly 

conduct. 



2 petit larceny. 



To asylum. 
17 petit larceny. 



1 guilty; sentence suspended, 
dismissed. 



1 assault and battery. 
1 manslaughter. 



To asylum. 



276 



THE PANAMA CANAL.. 

Criminal prosecutions, 1919-20 — Continued. 



Opium act, violation of 

Perjury 

Petit larceny 

Postal laws, violation of 

Quarantine regulations, vio- 
lation of. 
Rape 

Receiving stolen property. . 

Refusing to pay train fare 
for a minor. 

Revised Statutes, United 
States, sec. 459G, viola- 
tion of. 

Robbery 

Sanitary regulations, viola- 
tion of. 

Securing signature by false 
promises and pretenses. 

Seduction 

Vagrancy 

Total 



500 



249 



68 



Disposed of otherwise. 



I nol. pros . 



1 nol. pros 

1 bail forfeited. 



e 



nol. pros . 



1 information not filed. 
Inol. pros 



Remarks. 



1 guilty; sentence suspended, 
dismissed. 



2 petit larceny. 



1 guilty; sentence suspended, 
dismissed. 



132. 73 nol. pros. (3 to asylum); 7 bail forfeited; 2 informa- 
tions withdrawn; 2 informations not filed; 5 demurrers 
sustained, dismissed; 1 returned to United Stages; 32 
guilty of other offeiLses than those charged; 10 appeals 
withdra%vn. 



Guilty 249 

Not ^iity f>l 

Dismissed by court 68 

Disposed of otherwise l'^2 

Total 500 

In the 51 cases not guilty, 1 case was found guilty on original trial, 
a new trial was given by the court, and defendant was found not 
guilty. 

Of the 68 cases dismissed by the court, 4 were found guilty, sen- 
tence suspended by the court, and later dismissed. 

Of the 72 cases nol prossed by the district attorney, 3 were sent to 
the insane asylum at Corozal. In a great majority of the cases nol 
prossed more than one charge had been made against the defendants 
for the same or similar offenses, and the defendants being convicted on 
one charge, the district attorney entered a nol. pros in the other cases. 

In 32 cases the defendants were found guilty of offenses other than 
those charged, as follows : 

Charged. Found guilty. 

1 assault with deadly weapon Assault and battery. 

1 assault with deadly weapon Assault. 

1 assault with intent to commit rape Assault and battery. 

1 assault with intent to commit rape on minor child Do. 

1 assault with intent to commit infamous crime against nature.. Do. 

3 burglary Petit larceny. 

1 burglary Disorderly conduct. 

2 forgery Petit larceny. 

17 grand larceny Do. 

1 mayhem Assault and battery. 

1 murder (jurv) Manslaughter. 

2 robbery " Petit larceny. 

32 



REPORT OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 277 

Demurrers to the forms of informations were sustained in five cases 
and the cases dismissed. 

In 11 cases jury trials were demanded by the defendants, as 
follows : 

1 false pretenses and cheats 1 guilty. 

7 grand larceny (1 disagreed) 4 guilty, 2 not guilty, 

2 manslaughter 2 not guilty. 

1 murder 1 manslaughter, 

11 

Guilty 5 

Guilty of offense other than charged 1 

Not guilty 4 

Disagreed 1 

11 

Of the 500 cases disposed of 167 were cases on appeal from the 
magistrates' courts, disposed of as follows: 

Guilty 91 

Not guilty 22 

Dismissed by court 34 

Nol. pros 4 

Appeals withdrawn, fines paid 10 

Demurrers sustained , dismissed 3 

Guilty; sentence sivspended, dismissed by court 2 

Guilty; new trial given, not guilty 1 

Total 167 

Respectfully, 

A. C. HiNDMAN, 

District Attorney. 

Brig. Gen. Chester Harding, United States Army, 

Governor, The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. 



APPENDIX H. 
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL ATTORNEY. 

Ancon, Canal Zone, August 24, 1920. 

Sir: 1 have the honor to submit herwith my annual report as 
special attorney for The Panama Canal for the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1920. Following the usual practice I am including the 
business transacted by me as counsel for tlie Panama Railroad 
Company on tlie Isthmus, as well as a statement of the operations 
of the land ofRce of The Panama Canal and tlie real estate transac- 
tions of the Panama Railroad Company. 

The personnel of the special attorney's office was reduced during 
the fiscal year, due to the fact that the work of the joint commission 
terminated in the latter part of the fiscal year. The services of 
two land inspectors were discontinued. The organization at the 
present time consists of the special attorney, the assistant to the 
special attorney, one clerk, one draftsman on the gold roll, and one 
messenger on the silver roll. The assistant to the special attorney 
is also land agent for The Panama Canal. The special attorney is 
also counsel on the Isthmus for the Panama Railroad Company, 
and he is aided in his work by the assistant to the special attorney, 
whose salary is paid entirely by the Panama Railroad Company. 
Counsel for the railroad is provided with a clerk at the expense of the 
Panama Railroad Company. Counsel receives no salary from the 
Panama Railroad Company. 

Land Matters of The Panama Canal. 

A joint commission was appointed on February 28, 1913, by the 
President of the United States and the President of Panama, in 
conformity with Articles VI and XV of the Panama Canal treaty of 
1903. The commission continued until March 10, 1920, when they 
made their final report to the two Governments, after all of the 
cases upon the commission's docket had been disposed of, with the 
exception of 16 that remained on the docket for reasons which will 
be stated hereafter. 

A number of changes took place in the personnel of the commis- 
sion between 1913 and 1920, due to deaths and resignations of mem- 
bers. ]\fr. Federico Boyd was the only member who served 
throughout from the beginning to the end of the commission, with 
the exception of a few intervals when he was absent on account of 
illness. Mr. George A. Connolly, one of the American members of 
the joint commission, resigned on January 31, 1920, and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. H. A. A. Smith, who served on the commission until 
its labors terminated on March 10, 1920. 

A total of 3,600 claims were filed with the joirit commission from 
the date of its organization in 1913 to the termination of its work 
in 1920. By agreement of the Government of the United States 
and the Government of Panama, the commission established a rule 

278 



REPORT OF SPECIAL ATTORNEY. 279 

to the effect that no claims could be filed with the commission after 
December 27, 1914, unless good cause was shown why the claim had 
not been filed before that date, in which event the claim could be 
filed not later than the 27th day of March, 1915. A few claims 
were filed after the latter date with the consent of the tw( Gov- 
ernments. However, the total number of claims filed was 3,600, as 
already stated. 

All of the claims were disposed of by the commission or by the 
umpires, except the 16 claims already referred to. The aggregate 
demand made by the claimants in the above-mentioned 3,600 claims 
was $21,072,235.41. Some three or four hundred of these claims were 
filed by the members of the commission on their own motion, on 
behalf of claimants, during the first six months of the existence of 
the commission. No docket numbers were given to these claims at 
the time, nor were the respective amounts claimed by the claimants 
stated. A considerable number of these claims were disposed of 
by the commission during the year 1913, without public hearing, 
solely upon evidence obtained by the commission itself in chambers 
or without the presence of counsel for the United States or the 
claimants. Hence it is impossible to state with accuracy the value 
of the claims as asserted by the claimants in these particular cases, 
and in default of that data, the amount of the award or the sum paid 
to the claimant in direct settlement has been taken as the sum 
demanded by the claimants. After the reorganization of the com- 
mission in 1914 the claims which had not been numbered by the 
commission of 1913 were given consecutive numbers upon the 
commission's docket, and they are included in the 3,600 claims. 

It might be well to divide the claims disposed of by the commission 
into groups, stating also the aggregate amount of money paid by the 
United States, if any, for obtaining the adjustment of each respec- 
tive group. 

Since Februar}^, 1913, the joint commission has made awards in 
844 claims; the aggregate sum demanded in these claims was 
$6,116,682.97. The aggregate amount avv'arded by the commis- 
sion for the 844 claims was $880,534.79. 

The umpires of the joint commission appointed since its organiza- 
tion in 1913, disposed of 40 claims by awards in which the aggre- 
gate demand was $6,704,490.76. The amount awarded to these 
40 claimants by the umpires was $860,144.15. 

The commission since February, 1913, dismissed 2,041 claims on the 
ground that they had been settled directly between the claimants 
and the agents of the United States. The aggregate demand made 
in the 2,041 claims was $3,718,885.50. The aggregate amount paid 
by the Government in their settlement was $764,512.71. 

During the same period the joint commission defaulted 318 claims. 
The aggregate demand made in the 318 claims was $974,062.28. 

For the want of jurisdiction 178 claims were dismissed wherein a 
total of $1,504,821.15 was demanded. 

Because of a previous award having been made covering the same 
property the joint commission dismissed 42 claims, involving an 
aggregate demand of $388,277.37. 

There were 10 claims withdrawn upon the motion of claimants, and 
which were accordingly dismissed by the joint commission; the 
aggregate demand of the 10 claims was $167,397.50. 



280 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

For tho want of merit the joint commission dismissed 106 claims 
wherein the amount demanded was SI, 374, 040. 38. 

Five claims were found to be duplicates of prior claims and were 
accordingly dismissed by the joint commission. These five claims 
involved an aggregate demand of $1,798.50. 

It might be added that a considerable number of the 318 claims 
defaulted under the joint commission's rule because of the lack of 
prosecution were claims in which direct settlement had been made 
with the claimants by agents of the United States; and in a number 
of instan'^es these claims were duplicates filed by a commission of 
Panamans claiming to act as the representatives of the claimants 
under authority of the Panaman Government. This commission 
acted without suffiicent data, and, in consenuence, most of the claims 
which they filed related to property which had already been paid 
for by the United States, and the claimants were no longer interested 
in the matter, and in consequence made no appearance before the 
commission. 

One of the 318 claims noted here among those defaulted is the 
claim of the Playa de Flor Land & Development Co., docket No. 2900, 
for land and improvements at Toro Point, for which damages in the 
sum of 8357,040 were demanded. Tliis claim was set down for hear- 
ing on November 17, 1919, and when the case was called for trial 
upon that date the attorney of record for the claimants stated to 
the commission in ])ublic' session, and also in a written document, 
that he refused to submit the case to the jurisdiction of the com- 
mission. The American members of the commission voted to dis- 
miss the case at once, but the Panaman members declined to dismiss 
the claim. However, a rule of default was entered by the commis- 
sion, unanimously, against the claimants. At the expiration of the 
60-day period fixed in the rule, whi' h was established mth the con- 
sent of the two Governments, an extension was granted to February 
24, 1920. Tills also with the consent of the two Governments. On 
February 2 , 1920, a motion was filed by counsel for the claimants 
asking that the hearing be postponed until the 15th of March, 1920. 
The Panaman members of the commission voted to grant the motion; 
the American members voted to deny it. On February 26, 1920, 
counsel for the claimants asked that further action on the case be 
suspended until the umpire passed upon the issue, by reason of the 
fa"t that the members of the commission were equally divided in 
con lusion. The American members voted to deny this motion, while 
the Panaman members voted to grant the request. Upon this state 
of the case the American members were of opinion that the rule of 
default had become absolute. The Panaman members, on the other 
hand, contended that the disagreement should go to the umpire. 
I con'-ur in the conclusion reached by the American members that 
the rule of default became absolute and that there was nothing to 
refer to the umpire. 

I might add that subsequently the umpire, at the instance of the 
Panaman Government and without consulting the American Gov- 
ernment, gave an informal opinion to the Panaman Government that 
the issue should have been referred to him and that the case was still 
pending. Inasmuch as the matter had not been referred to tho um- 
pire by the two Governments or by the commission, he was without 
jurisdiction to make the announcement. 



REPORT OF SPECIAL ATTORNEY. 



281 



At all events, the commission terminated its labors and made its 
final report and the case can not come before another commission 
except with the consent of the two Governments. 

The 16 cases remaining undisposed of, already referred to in this 
report, involve claims arising under leases or contracts for occupancy 
of land in the Canal Zone made with the Panama Railroad Company. 
The Congi-ess of the United States, by virtue of section 2 of the 
sundry civil appropriation act of March 3, 1915. and section 2 of the 
sunchy civil appropriation act of July 1, 1916, deflared that the joint 
commission was without jurisdiction to adjudicate any such claims, 
and that no part of the moneys appropriated b}^ those acts or any 
other act could be used in the payment of such claims, or in the 
payment of salaries or expenses of the joint commission in adjudi- 
cating or settling any of such claims. In view of these positive 
Congressional mandates the American members of the commission 
declined to proceed to a hearing of the 16 claims. 

The 16 claims just mentioned were not within the jurisdiction of 
the commission, in my judgment. The leases held by the claimants 
were canceled by the Panama Railroad Companj^, the lessor, in con- 
formity with the terms of the lease. A disagreement arose as to the 
meaning of certain clauses of the leases with respect to the indemni- 
fication that the claimants were entitled to. Counsel for the Panama 
Railroad Company then suggested to the claimants that they institute 
suits in the Canal Zone courts to determine the issues. This they 
declined to do. They presented claims against the United States 
before the joint commission instead. They did this upon the alleged 
ground that the Panama Railroad Company had canceled the leases 
simply to clear the land for the benefit of the United States. While 
it may be conceded that their conclusion was correct, yet the issues 
were between them and the Panama Railroad Company, and any 
demand for damages that they might have was against the railroad 
and not against the United States. The agents of the Panama 
Railroad Company have repeatedly advised the claimants, since 
they filed their claims with tne joint commission, that the company 
was willing to submit the controversy to the courts of the Canal Zone; 
but the claimants have refused to do this. 



TABULATION OF THE AFOREMENTIONED CLAIMS. 

The 3,600 claims filed before the joint commission between Febru- 
ary, 1913, and the end of the period allowed for filing such claims, 
may be placed in the following classes or categories: 



Number 
of claitas 
involved. 




Amount 
claimed. 



Amount 

paid in 

settlement 

or awarded. 



Dismissed because of payment to claimants by agents of the 
United States 

Dismissed under rules of default 

Dismissed because of lack of jurisdiction 

Dismissed because of previous award of the joint commission 
in a prior claim 

Withdrawn 

Dismissed because of lack of merit 

Dismissed because of beuig duplicates of other claims filed by 
the same person 

Awarded for by the joint commission 

Awarded for by the umpire 

Undisposed of by the joint commission and the umpire 



$3, 718, 885. 50 

974,062.28 

1,504,821.15 

388,277.37 

167,397.50 

1,374,040.38 

1, 798. 50 

6, 116, 682. 97 

6,704,490.76 

121,779.00 



$764,512.71 



880,534.79 
860,144.15 



282 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

The various joint commissions and umpires appointed under the 
Panama Canal treaty ])rior to December 5, 1912, made 21 awards, 
aggre.sjating the suni of $304,588. There are no data available to 
indicate what the aggregate of these 21 claims amounted to as de- 
manded by the claimants. We thus have a grand total of 905 
claims settled and paid for under awards made by all of the joint 
commissions and umpires appointed under tlie treat}^, aggregating 
the sum of $2,045,266.94. 

It might be well to say that the claimants in a few cases have 
declined to accept the moneys awarded to them by the commission. 
The award made by the umpire in the sum of $102,400 in favor of 
the claimants in the case of Julia del Carmen Bermudez de Aleman 
at al., docket No. 2982, involving the Punta Paitilla property, has 
not been paid, inasmuch as counsel for the Government declined to 
certify the award for payment upon the ground that the umpire 
had departed from instructions to him contained in the treaty, and 
the matter has been submitted to the State Department for its con- 
sideration. 

The statements contained in this report, with respect to claims 
disposed of by the commission and by direct settlement with the 
land office, are made after a careful examination of our records and 
those of the joint commission, and discrepancies between our re- 
cords and those of the joint commission appear to be due to the 
following causes: 

The fact that the commission early in 1913 entered up so many 
claims upon their owni motion without stating the amount demanded 
by the claimants. A number of claims were dismissed in part, an 
award made to the claimants in part, and again only a part of the 
claim was referred to the umpire under disagreement. The claim- 
ants in several cases were allowed to amend their claims verbally, 
during the trail, by increasing the amount demanded. In other 
cases awards were made for the improvements only, and later other 
awards were made in the same cases for the land claimed, and this 
together with awards to other claimants, the cases having been con- 
solidated. 

While there may be some inaccuracies in the statements made in 
this report, everything has been done that is possible to reach cor- 
rect conclusions, and it is believed that the discrepancies between 
the records of this office and those of the joint commission have 
been substantially adjusted in this report. 

LAND CLAIMS DISPOSED OF DURING TILE FISCAL YEAR. 

Forty-five land and improvement claims were settled by the land 
office during the iiscal year 1919-1920, aggregating the sum of $33,- 
238.96. 

A total of 4,537 land and improvement claims were settled and 
paid for by the land office since tlie work of the clearing of the Canal 
Zone commenced under the President's depopulation order of Dec- 
ember 5, 1912, aggregating tlie sum of $1,154,475.56. These settle- 
ments were made direct by the land office with the various claim- 
ants, and no awards made by the joint commission or the umpires 
are included in the foregoing statement. 



EEPOET OF SPECIAL ATTORNEY. 283 

The law department of The Panama Canal was authorized to 
settle land claims on Au2;ust 6, 1908, by virtue of an Executive 
order of the President. Since that date the law department, and 
afterwards the ofhce of the special attorney, under authority of the 
act of Congress of April 7, 1914, have settled flirectly with the claim- 
ants 5,599 claims for damages to land and improvements taken 
over bv the Government for Canal and railroad purposes. The 
amounts paid in settlement of all of these claims aggregated the sum 
of $1,403,878.86, including the sum of $764,512.71 paid by way of 
direct settlement of 2,041 claims filed by the claimants with the joint 
comm.ission and which claims were afterwards dismissed by the 
commission because of such direct settlements with the Govern- 
ment. 

Some settlements for improvements destroyed were made by the 
Canal and railroad organizations prior to August 6, 1908. But in- 
asmuch as these transactions were not handled by the law depart- 
ment, which was not created until August 6, 1908, there are no data 
available in this office with respect to such settlements. I might 
say, however, that they do not involve any very large sum of money. 

The total amount paid for land and improvement claims under 
awards of all of the commissions and umpires appointed inider the 
Canal treaty (the first commission having been appointed in 1905) 
as well as pa^Tnents made under direct settlements made with the 
claimants since August 6, 1908, the date on which the law depart- 
ment was created, aggregated a grand total of $3,448,645.80. 

At the commencement of the fiscal year there were pending be- 
fore the joint commission 94 claims, involving an aggregate demand 
of $2,466,869.81. There were pending before the umpire 13 claims, 
wherein the aggregate demand amounted to $3,695,796.56. There 
were no new claims filed during the fiscal year. 

During the year the joint commission certified to the umpire for 
his decision 7 claims, wherein the total amount demanded was 
$683,516.67. He disposed of a total of 20 claims during the fiscal 
year, wherein an aggregate demand was made of $4,379,313.23. 
Thirteen of these claims were certified to him during the year 1918- 
19. Of these 20 claims, 17 were disposed of by the umpire through 
17 awards, aggregating the sum of $495,776.70. The aggregate 
amount claimed in these 17 claims was $4,125,713.23. The umpire 
dismissed 3 claims. Two of these claims were for the aggregate sum 
of $103,600, and went oft' for the want of merit. The other claim, 
entitled Quebrada de Oro Plantation & Mining Co., docket No. 3003, 
Avas dismissed by the umpire without i:>rejudice to the right of the 
claimant to file its claim before a competent tribunal. The amount 
demanded in this claim was $150,000. We take this dismissal to 
mean a final disposition of the claim in so far as the Government of 
the United States is concerned. We are also of the opinion that 
the claim is without merit. The claimant, however, is making efforts 
to have the claim resubmitted to another commission. 

During the fiscal year the joint commission disposed of 71 claims, 
wherein the aggregate demand was $1,304,534.14, and in detail are 
as follows: 

Seven of the claims, involving an aggregate demand of $69,263.64, 
were disposed of by nine awards, the aggregate amount awarded 



284 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

bein^ $19,074.91. One claim, wherein S50,000 was demanded, was 
dismissed on claimant's motion. Seventeen claims, wherein an 
aggregate sum of S72,056.35 was demanded, were dismissed by the 
commission because of lack of jurisdiction. Twenty-two claims, 
asking for $326,893.65, were dismissed by the commission on evidence 
being presented that the claimants had made direct settlements 
with the agents of the United States. Five claims, asking for 
$302,582, were dismissed on account of previous awards having been 
made for the same property. Nine claims, wherein $215,764.50 
were demanded, were dismissed by the commission because of lack 
of merit. Ten claims, wherein the aggregate demand made was for 
$625,014, were dismissed under the commission's rule of default on 
account of failure to prosecute on the part of the claimants. 

There still remain undisposed of 16 claims, being claims based 
upon Panama Raihoad Company leases already referred to in this 
report. The aggregate amount demanded in the 16 claims is the 
sum of $121,779. 

It might be well to refer again to the claim of the Playa de Flor 
Land & Development Co., involving a demand for $357,040, which 
we contend went off by defaidt and which the claimants say is still 

E ending, and their contention is supported by the Panaman mem- 
ers of the joint commission and by the unauthorized ruling of 
the umpire. 

PANAMiA CANAL LAND LICENSES. 

On June 30, 1920, there were 58 lot licenses in effect in the Canal 
Zone, which had been issued by the land agent on behalf of The 
Panama Canal. Of this number seven licenses were issued during 
the fiscal year 1919-20. The licenses were granted to various par- 
ties to erect oil tanks, steamship office buildings, cable offices, lodge 
halls, and residences for the employees of steamship companies, oil 
companies, and the cable company. The licenses also included lots 
for churches. The revenue collected on these licenses for the fiscal 
year 1919-20 aggregated the sum of $16,290.02. No rental, however, 
was collected on lots occupied by churches and used for religious 
purposes. 

PANAMA RAILROAD LAND MATTERS. 

The land agent of The Panama Canal acts as land agent for the 
Panama Railroad Company under a contract between The Panama 
Canal and the Panama Railroad Company by the terms of which 
the latter pays to the former the sum of $9,000 per annum for such 
service. 

PANAMA RAILROAD LEASES AND LICENSES REPORTED BY THE LAND 

AGENT. 

I am submitting herewith a statement of leases and licenses from 
the Panama Raihoad Company to various parties in effect July 1, 
1920, as shown by the land office records: 



REPORT OF SPECIAX, ATTORNEY. 285 

Statement oj Panama Railroad leases and licenses in effect July 1, 1920. 



Location. 



Colon 

Folks River, R. P 

Stable lots, Colon 

Las Esplanadas 

Guachapali 

Santa Cruz 

Panama Yard including Eng- 
lish wharf and bulkhead 

Juan Ponce 

Total for leases 



Leases. 



July 1,1919. July 1,1920 



823 
52 



103 
153 



1,246 



853 
52 



103 
153 
89 

18 
1 



Lots. 



July 1,1919. July 1,1920, 



a30 

54 

11 
122 
194 
107i 

29i 
1 



1,349 



878 
54 



122 
194 
107 

30 
1 



1,386 



Rental. 



July 1,1919. July 1,1920 



$82,282.28 
2,926.40 
534.00 
3,987.00 
8,378.93 
4,001.28 

5,368.00 
60.00 



107, 537. 89 



$96,309.40 
2, 926. 40 



3,987.00 
8,378.93 
4,001.28 

5,392.00 
60.00 



121,055.01 



Location. 


Licenses and permis- 
sions. 


Lots. 


Rental. 




3 

24 

6 
1 
2 

1 
2 

1 


3 
25 






$114.00 

21,180.00 

1,505.52 

1,560.00 

360. 00 

1.00 

120.00 

120.00 


$114.00 


Buildings, rooms, and stores. 






21,302.04 




8 




(') 




1 




480.00 




2 

1 
2 






Miscellaneous (Panama) 

Javlllofill 


1 
3 

1 

1 


1 
3 


1.66 
168.00 


Room in Panama R. R. sta- 


120. 00 


Panama R. R. Building, Hu- 






900.00 














Total for licenses and 
permissions 


40 


35 


13 


4 


24,960.52 


23,085.04 






Grand total for all leases, 
licenses, and permis- 
sions 


1,286 


1,304 


1,362 


1,390 


132,498.41 


144, 140. 05 







1 This item covers steamship-lot sites in Cristobal, and is no longer collected by the Panama Railroad 
Company, having been turned over to The Panama Canal accounts during the fiscal year just past. 

The foregoing statement relates to lots leased by the railroad 
company in the cities of Panama and Colon. 

A decided increase is shown in the amount of approximated land- 
rental bills to be issued during the next fiscal year, for the city of 
Colon, as compared with the approximate land-rental bills issued 
during the fiscal year 1918-19, which can be accounted for by the 
fact that during the year just ended 15 lots were leased in the newly 
created warehouse district at an annual rental of $4,543.52. In 
addition, 38 lots were leased in the newly created white residential 
district at an annual rental of $8,810. 

The licenses for all the stable lots located on the south side of Ninth 
Street, between G and I Streets, Colon, were canceled during the 
year b}^ the direction of the health officer of Colon-Cristobal. The 
major portion of the new concrete stables being built by the Panama 
Railroad Company have been completed, and all draft and coach 
animals of Colon and all wagons, carts, and coaches are now being 
stabled and accommodated in the new buildings. These stables are 
located south of Sixteenth Street, between Reyes Alley and G Street. 

A slight increase is shown in this report in the amount of approxi- 
mated rentals on buildings, rooms, and stores. Colon and Cristobal, 
accounted for by the reason that two new storerooms were created 



286 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

out of two alloy ways in the Panama Kailroad Company's concrete 
building, Colon", located on Eleventh, Front, and Bottle Alley, and 
have been leased at an annual rental of $540, and the rental rate of 
one storeroom in the same building was increased S62.04 per annum; 
offsetting these increases we must deduct the sum of $480 per annum 
on accomit of the fact that the lease issued to one lessee for the joint 
occupancy of room 7-A, Masonic Temple, Cristobal, with the land 
agent, has been canceled, the lessee having secm^ed the lease to a 
larger ofhce room in the same building. At the present time room 
7-A is occupied only by the land agent. 

A warehouse district (bonded or unbonded) was opened up during 
the year, the district comprising 21 lots located in block 54, Colon, 
situate be^^ween Reyes Alley, G, Fifteenth, and Sixteenth Streets. 
The district is divided into tlirce tiers of 7 lots each, and 14 of the 21 
lots have a frontage upon a street through which a spur track has 
been run to accommodate the handling of freight into and out of 
the warehouse, the spur running north and south between two of 
the tiers and joins the Broadway track. Fifteen of the 21 lots were 
leased during the year, and there are now before us several inquhies 
relating to the lease rights in the remaining 6 lots. 

A residential district, restricted to the use of persons of the Cauca- 
sian race only, was opened up during the vear, the district consisting 
of blocks 20, 21, 26, and 27, a total of 99 lots. This district is 
bounded on the north by Seventh Street, on the east by K Street, 
on the south by Ninth Street, and on the west by G Stree^. During 
the year 38 of the lots were leased. There are applications before 
us now for the lease rights in several of the remaining lots. 

During the fiscal year the Panama Railroad Company purchased 
a two-story wooden building from IVIi'. Joseph D. Williams, which 
building is located on the Huerta Sandoval tract in the city of Panama, 
owned by the United States and held under license by the Panama 
Railroad Company, for the sum of $5,000. The building division 
of The Panama Canal renovated the building into a tenement-type 
house at a cost of $5,850.39. We have leased the building under tem- 
porary permission for the sum of $75 per month, which price includes 
light and water. 

The total of leases, licenses, and permissions issued by the Panama 
Railroad Company on lots in the cities of Panama, Colon, and Cristobal 
in effect on July 1, 1920, was 1,304, covering 1 ,390 lots, and for which 
bills were issued in the amount of $144,140.05, during the fiscal year 
1919-20, as shown by the records of the land office, which figures 
are $11,641.64 more than those shown for the corresponding item 
in the report for the fiscal year 1918-19. 

The total amount of money actually collected on account of the 
items covered in the preceding paragra])h din'iiig the fiscal year 
just ended, as indicated by ffgurcs submitted to this ofhce by the 
auditor, is $135,996.46, and which represents an hicrease of $3,643.77 
over the actual collections on account of the same items for the year 
1918-19; that is to say, $8,143.59 less than the aggregate amount 
of the bills rendered. All of this, or practically all of it, has been 
paid since the end of the fiscal year. 

Thirty-tlu-ee new leases were issued during the fiscal year 1919-20, 
covering 55 lots, all in the city of Colon, 



BEPOET OF SPECIAL ATTORNEY. 287 

No fires which afiocted property situated on Panama Railroad 
Company lots, of sufficient importance to warrant any mention here 
occurred during the fiscal year. 

On June 26, 1920, the Board of Directors of the Panama Railroad 
Company authorized the land agent to grant extensions, beyond the 
usual five-year period upon the expiration of the present leases 
on lots upon which wooden buildings have been erected, at the best 
rental rates then obtainable. According to the authority granted 
when a lease is about to expire a representative of the building division 
will inspect the building situate upon the lot, and if the building 
division's representative finds that the condition of the building 
warrants it, an extension of 5, 10, or 15 years (depending upon the 
condition of the building) will be granted by the Panama Railroad 
Company. 

During the fiscal year the fill between Third and Ninth, G and K 
Streets was completed and, as already stated in this report, the occu- 
pancy of the area between Seventh and Ninth, G and K vStreets, has 
been restricted to members of the Caucasian race. An additional fill 
is now being made along the south side of Ninth Street, between 
Broadway and K Streets. 

Municipal work in block 53 has started. This block is located 
directly north of block 54, the area laid aside during the year for 
warehouse sites. 

Panama Railroad Litigation. 

The litigation against the Panama Railroad Comjjany in the Canal 
Zone has increased to a considerable degree, due largely to the action 
of the courts in holding that resort ma}" be had to principles of the 
common law in the interpretation of the statutes of Colombian and 
Panaman origin. Also due largely to the wreck of the passenger 
train which occurred near Gamboa on May 20, 1918, in which some 
of the second-class coaches of the company were demolished and some 
passengers killed and a considerable number injured. 

As a result of the Gamboa wreck a large number of claims for 
damages because of alleged personal injuries and loss of personal 
property were presented against the railroad company. The greater 
number of claims presented were adjusted by the claim officer. 
Seventeen suits were filed for alleged personal injuries and loss of 
property occasioned by the wreck. The claims for damages in these 
suits aggregate the sum of 1187,043.60. Fifteen of these suits, in- 
volving an aggregate demand of 8165,323, have been disposed of 
either by judgment or compromise settlement. The aggregate 
amount of such settlements and judgmeTits was $18,275. Two of the 
17 suits remained pending in the Canal Zone courts at the end of the 
fiscal year and they represent an aggregate demand of 821,720.60. 

The 15 claims above refei'red to as having been either amicably 
settled or adjudicated in the Canal Zone courts include the cases 
of Camila Castilla v. Panama Railroad Company and James Rock v. 
Panama Railroad Company, in which judgments .for 81,500 and 
$3,000, res})ectively, were rendered against the railroad company. 
Both of these cases are now jKMiding in the United States Circuit 
Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, at New Orleans, on writ of 
error sued out by the railroad company. 



288 THE PANAMA CANAL.. 

The following Panama Railroad cases were pending at the end of 
the fiscal year: 

DISTRICT COURT, CRISTOBAL DIVISION. 

Louis Anderson v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No, 319. This is a 
case wherein suit is brought for damages in the amount of $2,500 on account of personal 
injuries alleged to have l)een received by the plaintiff while in the employ of the com- 
pany at its cold -storage plant at Mount Hope, Canal Zone, which injuries involved the 
loss of a finger on the right hand. Appearance for the defendant has been cluly en- 
tered in the ca.-^e and a motion on the latter's behalf requiring plaintiff to file security 
for costs is now pending in said suit. 

John A. Brown, administrator of the estate of Adolphus Brown, deceased, v. Pana- 
ma Railroad Company, civil docket No. 231. This is a suit for damages in the amount 
of $10,000 on account of the death of plaintiff's decedent which occurred through the 
negligence as alleged of the defendant company while the deceased was in its employ 
in the cold-storage plant at Cristobal. The defendant has filed a demurrer to the 
plaintiff's complaint and also a motion to require the plaintiff to give security for 
costs. 

Louis Bennett v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 240. This is a suit 
for damages in the sum of S15,000, based upon the alleged personal injuries of a minor 
nature sustained l)y plaintiff resulting from the collapse of a defective veranda of 
one of the houses used as employees' quarters by The Panama Canal, in which building 
the plaintiff was employed as a house servent by the employee who occupied it. 
Since the filing of the suit the plaintiff has joined the chief quartermaster, Panama 
Canal, as party defendant. The defendant has entered its appearance and has filed 
a motion asking that the plaintiff be required to give security for costs. 

This case will doubtless be dismissed as there is no responsibility of the Panama 
Railroad involved. The house in question is under the control and jurisdiction of 
The Panama Canal. 

Messrs. Albert and Jacob David Cohen, a copartnership doing business under the 
firm name and style of Cohen Brothers, plaintiffs, v. The United Fruit Co. This is 
an action for conversion and damages involving the loss of 16 cases of shoes. The 
Panama Railroad Company has been made a party defendant. 

Alsace Carrina v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 268. This is an 
action for damages in the amount of $5,000, based on alleged slanderous statements 
made of the plaintiff, who was employed on the Cristobal docks of the company, by 
an agent and servant of the defendant. A demurrer was filed by the defendant to the 
plaintiff's complaint on July 31, 1919, which demurrer was argued by counsel for 
both parties in the case very soon thereafter, and was taken under advisement by 
the court. No decision had been reached at the end of the fiscal year. 

Joseph Jordan v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 317. This is a suit 
for damages in the amount of .$5,000 arising out of alleged personal injm'ies and dam- 
ages to a coach sustained by plaintiff at the 11th street crossing in Colon. The com- 
pany has duly appeared in the case and filed a motion requiring the plaintiff to give 
security for costs. 

Joseph Liscomb v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 226. This is a 
suit for damages in the sum of .$5,500, based on the alleged fact that plaintiff was 
denied passage on one of the railroad steamers after purchasing a ticket entitling him 
to such passage. The defendant appeared in the case and filed pleas to the jurisdic- 
tion of the court, and also a motion requiring the plaintiff to give security for costs. 

Adolphus Lodge, a minor, by his guardian ad litem, V. G. de Suze, v. Panama 
Railroad Company, civil docket No. 136. This is a suit for damages in the amount 
of $10,000 for injuries alleged to have been sustained by plaintiff because of being run 
into by one of defendant's engines in Cristobal. Appearance was entered by the 
defendant and a motion on its behalf was filed to require the plaintiff to give security 
for costs. 

P. W. Murray v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 315. This is a suit 
for damages in the amount of $677.60 arising out of the alleged loss of and damage to 
certain household goods which were being carried on defendant's steamship Elizabeth. 
Appearance was entered on behalf of the defendant as well as a motion requiring the 
plaintiff to give security for costs. 

Hyman Magnus, a minor, by his guardian ad litem, Josephine Gray, v. Panama 
Railroad Company, civil docket No. 263. This is a suit which invoh'cs a claim of 
$50,000, based on the alleged personal injuries sustained by the minor through being 
run down by one of defendant's commissary delivery trucks. The defendant has 
filed an answer in the case as well as a motion requiring the plaintiff to give security 
for costs. 



REPORT OP SPECIAL ATTORNEY. 289 

Wanen E. Minnix r. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 327. This is a 
suit for dama.2;es in the sum of $7,500 arising? out of alleged injuries sustained by the 
plaintiff in the course of his employment at the defendant's coaling plant at Cristobal. 
Appearance on behalf of the defendant has been entered. 

Frederick Olivierre v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 302. This is 
a suit for damages in the amount of .$2,500 arising out of alleged personal injuries 
sustained by the plaintiff while employed as a stevedore on defendant's docks in 
Cristobal. Defendant has filed a demurrer to plaintiff's complaint and also a motion 
to require the plaintiff to give security for costs. 

Panama Railroad (^'ompany v. United P^'ruit Co., civil docket No. 278. This is a 
suit for damages in the amount of .'j!314.21, the value of certain cold-storage supplies 
which it is alleged were mishandled by the defendant company on one of its steamers, 
ahd as a result were totally lost to the plaintiff. The suit is now pending upon com- 
plaint and answer. 

John Richard r. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 296. This is a suit 
for damages in the amount of .'?2,000, based upon the alleged personal injuries sustained 
by the plaintiff while in the employ of the defendant on the docks at Cristobal. The 
defendant has filed a demurrer to plaintiff's complaint and also a motion to require 
the plaintiff to give security for costs. 

Catherine Rice, administratrix of the estate of Jonathan Rice, deceased, v. Panama 
Railroad Company, civil docket No. 252. This is a suit for damages in the amount of 
$25,000 arising out of alleged injuries resulting in the death of Jonathan Rice, while 
in the employ of the defendant at its coaling plant in Cristobal. The defendant com- 
pany has filed a demurrer to plaintiff's complaint and also a motion to require the 
plaintiff to give security for costs. 

George Scott r. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 238. This is a suit 
for damages in the amount of S7,500, based upon alleged personal injuries sustained 
by the plaintiff, consisting of the loss of one hnger, while in the employ of The Panama 
Canal on defendant's docks in Cristobal. Demurrer has been filed by the defendant 
to the plaintiff's complaint and also a motion to require the plaintiff to give security 
for costs. 

Alexander White i'. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 262. This is a 
suit for damages in the amount of 1512,500 arising out of alleged injuries sustained by 
the plaintiff while on defendant's right of way along the Margarita spur of the railroad. 
The defendant has filed an answer to the complaint and also a motion to require the 
plaintiff to give security for costs. 

Alpheus Williams, administrator of the estate of Samuel Augustus Williams, de- 
ceased, v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 270. This is a suit for damages 
in the amount of $10,000 arising out of alleged injuries resulting in the death of Samuel 
Augustus Williams, who was employed by the defendant company on its docks in 
Cristobal. The defendant has filed a demurrer to plaintiff's complaint and also a 
motion to require the plaintiff to give security for costs. 

DISTRICT COURT, BALBOA DIVISION. 

Louis Strobel v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 277. This is an action 
for damages in the sum of $20,000 arising out of personal injuries alleged to have been 
sustained in the Gamboa wreck on May 20, 1918. Defendant has filed a demurrer 
to plaintiff's complaint and also a motion to require the plaintiff to give security 
for costs. 

James J. Towey v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 259. This is an 
action for damages in the sum of $2,350.60 based upon alleged personal injuries and 
the loss of personal baggage which was in the plaintiff's custody at the time of the 
Gamboa wreck on May 20, 19 IS. The claim for damages based upon plaintiff's per- 
sonal injuries was dis])osed of by compromise through which the defendant paid the 
plaintiff the sum of $300. The plaintiff then amended his complaint and asked for 
$1,720.60, the alleged value of certain moneys and personal property which he claimed 
he had on his person or in his custody at the time of the wreck and which were lost. 
The defendant filed a demurrer to the amended complaint and also a motion to re(]uire 
the plaintiff to give security for costs. 

THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Panama Railroad Company, plaintiff in error r. Noel Pigott, a minor, by his guar- 
dian ad litem, George Morrell, defendant in error. No. 425. This was a suit for 
$50,000 damages on account of personal injuries sustained by Noel Pigott, a minor, 
and which resulted from an accident occurring in the city of Colon. Re])ublic of 

8847—20 19 



290 'J^l' l^ANAMA CAKAL. 

Panama, Judgment was rendered against the railroad company in the district 
court of the Canal Zone, Cristobal division, for the sum of $7,500. The judgment 
of the trial court was afhrmed by the circuit court of appeals at New Orleans, and 
thereupon writ of error was sued out from the Supreme (Jourt of the United States 
by the railroatl company, and the case is now pending in that court. 

The following- Pniianiu Railroad ('ompaiiy cases were disposed of 
either by judiiinciit or ('omj)roinise settlement during the fiscal 
year just ended : 

niSTKUT COURT, ClUSTObAI. DIVISION. 



Edwin r>rown ( . Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 297. This is a suit 




ber 7, 1916. by payment of the sum of $2()5.35 to the i)laintiff , and thereupon the suit 
was duly dismissed upon the plaintiff's motion. 

Jame.-^ Daley r. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 70. This was an 
action for debt in the sum of $440.80, arising out of an alleged breach of contract by 
the railroad comi)any. The_ plaintiff entered a nonsuit on September 4, 1919, and 
thereupon the case was dismissed . 

T. A. Green r. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 97. This was an action 
for damages in the amount of $1,000 for injuries resulting in the death of a horse struck 
by one oli defendant's trains in the city of Colon on July 4, 1914. The plaintiff 
died in the year 19J7. The case was settled by compromise with his administratrix, 
the Panama Railroad Company paying her $200 in full satisfaction of the claim and 
the case was thereupon dismissed. 

Herbert Evans r. Panama Railroad Comijany, civil docket No. 273. 'J'his suit 
was for damages in the sum of $5,000 based upon an alleged assault committed upon 
the plaintiff by the defendant's conductor while the plaintiff was a passenger on one 
of defendant's' trains. A judgment was rendered in favor of plaintiff' against the de- 
fendant in the sum of $250, plus $24 costs on March 31, 1920, and the judgment was 
satisfied by the defendant. 

Ixjuis llarewood v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 250. Thiswad 
an action for damages in the amount of $450 arising out of an alleged collision between 
plaintiff's coach and one of defendant's engines at what is known as the Broadway 
crossing in Colon. The case was settled by the payment to the plaintiff by the de- 
fendant of the sum of $200, and it was dismissed upon plaintiff's motion. 

Charles Ilaynes v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 292. This was an 
action for damages in the amoimt of $5,000 because of alleged per.soual injuries re- 
ceived by the plaintiff while in the employ of the defendant on the defendant's docks 
in Cristobal. Tlie suit was compromised by the defendant pa>dng to the plaintiff 
the sum of $500 and furnishing the plaintiff' with deck passage from the Isthmus to 
Jamaica. The suit was thereupon dismissed on ])laintiff's motion. 

Fitz Gerald Oxlcy and Louise Oxley, his wife, v. Panama Railroad Company, ci^il 
docket No. 279. This was a suit for damages in the amount of $3,000 arising out of 
alleged personal injuries sustained by Louise Oxley while alighting from a train at 
Gatun. Compromise settlement was effected by which the railroad company paid to 
the plaintiff the sum of $650, and the suit was thereupon dismissed on plaintiff's 
motion. 

Anastasia Pearl, administratrix of the estate of Josiah Rlake v. Panama Railroad 
Company, civil docket No. 291, This was a suit for damages in the suni of $2,220 
arising out of alleged personal injuries which resulted in the death of Josiah Blake, 
who, it was claimed, was run over by a labor train in Colon in 1906. On December 4, 
J 919, the suit was dismissed without prejudice upon the plaintiff's motion. 

Anastasia Pearl has since filed a suit foi- damages against the Panama Railroad 
(Jompany in the Panainau courts in which substantially the same issues are presented. 

Messrs. Segal and Brockman, copartners, doing business as the Panama-American 
Junk Company v. Panama Railroad Company, c ivil docket No. 242. This is an action 
for damages in the amount of $469.15, arising out of the alleged loss of freight by the 
defendant's steamship company. The case was dismissed on plaintiff's motion on 
September 18, 1919. 

Clare E. Smith r. Panama Railroad (Company, civil docket No. 281. This was a 
suit for damages in the sum of $J 2,500 arising out of alleged jiersonal injuries sustained 
by the plaintiff as a result of being run over by one of the defendant's commissary 
delivery trucks. The ])laintiff recovered the sum of $2,750, plus $58.10 costs, upon a 
verdict of the jury, and the judgment was satisfied by the defendant company. 



REPOKT OF SPECIAL ATTORNEY. 291 

Abraham Tluope r. Pauaiiia Railroad (bmpany, civil docket No. 200. This was a 
Buit for dania,<2;os in the sum of $1,000 arising out of alleged personal injm-ies sustained 
by the plaintiff wiiile in defendant's eini)loy on its docks in Cristobal. The suit 
was compromised by the defendant paying the i)laintiff $500 and a dismissal of the 
same was formally entered on September 4, 1919. 

Arnold Valencia v. Panama Railroad (Jompany, civil docket No. 108. This was a 
suit for damages in the sum of $2,000 arising out of the defendant company's alleged 
failure to deliver plaintiff's baggage aboard the steamship Danube and thus causing 
the plaintiff to delay his sailing. On September 4, 1919, plaintiff entered a nonsuit 
and the case was ac<'ordingly dismissed. 

Fred Warden v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 280. This was a 
suit for damages in the sum of .'SS.OOO arising out of alleged injuries sustained by the 
plaintiff at the coaling plant in ('risto])al. The suit was amicably settled by payment 
to the plaintiff of the sum of §100, whereupon the suit was dismissed on plaintiff'*' 
motion. 

Ill addition to these, suits disposed of in the (^listobal (Hvision of 
the district court during' the fiscal year, the claims of Ilubeit 
McPherson and (xiu'ditta Singh r. Panama Railroad Company were 
com])romised without suit by the payment of 8500 and •'*;75, respec- 
tively, to the above-iiamed claimants, the first-named claimant 
being furnished transportation from Ciistobal to Kinosion in addi- 
tion to tlie S500 |)aid to him. 

msTKICT COIRT, BAI.BOA DIVISION'. 

Stanley .Railey r. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 274. This was a 
suit for damages in the sum of 810,000 arising out of alleged personal injuries received 
by the plaintiff while in the employ of the defendant company as an electrician's 
helper at Gamboa. The suit was formally dismissed on December 8, 1919, because of 
the plaintiff's acceptance of compensation under the act of September 7, 1916. 

Camila Castilla r. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 292. This was an 
action for damages in the amount of §50.000 arising out of the alleged death by wrongful 
act of plaintiff's decedent, a minor, male, illegitimate child, age 6 years, which met 
its death in the Gamboa wreck on May 20, 1918. Trial was liad before a jury which 
resulted in a verdict for the plaintiff in the sum of §1.500. Defendant sued out a writ 
of error from the United States Circuit Court of Appeals at New Orleans, and the case 
is now pending in that coiu't. 

Bienvenida Cabeza v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 303. This was 
an action for damages in the sum of §15,000 arising out of injuries alleged to have been 
sustained by the plaintiff in the Gamboa wreck on May 20, 1918. The case was ami- 
cably settled and the plaintiff received from the defendant the sum of §2,400 in full 
satisfaction of all demands, and thereupon the suit was dismissed by the plaintiff. 

DTIlip Singh r. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 260. This was an 
action lor the recovery of the value of personal property consisting of money which 
the plaintiff alleged he lost from his person at the time of the Gamboa wreck on May 
20, 1918. Trial was had before a jury and a verdict was rendered in favor of the de- 
fendant. 

The demand of the plaintiff in his original complaint was for damages in the sum 
of §973. However, the railroad company disposed of those elements of damages in 
the suit involving plaintiff's personal injuries and the loss of nesessary personal bag- 
gage by payment to him of §175. The amended complaint upon which the parties 
went to trial, made a demand for the sum of §685 and interest — the amount in cash 
alleged to have been actually lost from plaintiff's person in the wreck. 

(irace <!arrison r. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 316. This was an 
action for damages in tlie sum of §5,000 arising out of alleged personal injuries sustained 
by the plaintiff in tlio Gamboa wreck on May 20, 1918. Th(> case was compromised 
by the defendant paying to the plaintiff the sum of §2.000, and dismissal of the suit 
was tliereupon entered upon plaintiff's motion. 

William Green v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 256. This was an 
action for damages in the sum of §5.000 based upon alleged personal injuries received 
in tlie Gamboa wreck on May 20, 1918. Compromise settlement was effected by which 
the railroad company paid to the plaintiff the sum of $300 and thereupon the case was 
dismissed upon the plaintiffs motion. 

Llewlyn Malcolm v. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 248. This was 
a suit for damages in the sum of §2.000 arising out of alleged personal injuries sustained 



292 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

by tlu' plaintiff in tlio (iiunl)()a wreck on May 20, lid.s. The auit was amicably settled 
by pavinu: tlie plaintiff (lie sum of i^lOO, and a dismissal was formally entered on August 
25. 1919. 

James Eock r. ranania Railroad Company, civil docket Xo. IMO. This was an action 
for damages in tlu^ sum of S15.000 arising out of the death by alleged wrongful act of 
plaintiff s decedent, Tlachael Roc'-, his wife, in the r;am]>oa wreck on May 20. 1918. 
Trial by jury was had on May l:^. 1920. and result'd in a verdict in favor of the plaintiff 
in the suni of s;!.00(). \ writ of error was sued out from the United States Circuit 
Court of Appf»als l)y the defendant company and the rase is now pending in that court. 

Mateo Ugalde r. Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 235. This was an 
action for damages in the sum of §7.500 based upon alleged personal injuries resulting 
in the loss of some ting^-rs while the plaintiff was employed by the cattle industry at 
Summit. The plaintiff accepted compensation under the compensation act of Con- 
gress of September 7, 191fi. and upon his motion the suit was dismissed on November 
28, 1919. 

The claim of Maria Joseph v. Panama Kailroad Company, in 
which no formal suit was filed, and which claim was based upon 
alleged injuries received by the claimant in the silver market at 
Ancon, because of an alleged defect in the floor thereof, was settled 
amicably by paying to Maria Joseph the sum of $250. 

magistrate's COIRT, HALBOA inVIKIOX. 

The case of the Panama Railroad Company v. Carlos E. Diez, was filed in the magis- 
trate's court, division of Balljoa. on January 29, 1920, to recover the value of certain 
automobile repairs made at the railroad company's shops on certain machines owned 
by the defendant. Judgment by default was obtained against Diez on IVbruarv 6, 
1920, in the sum of $205.04 with costs. 

TUK STTPREME COURT OF TUK I'NITEI) STATES. 

Panama Railroad Company, plaintiff in ei'ror, v. Joseph T. Toppin, defendant in 
error. No. 519. This was a suit for damages in the sum of .f;l 5.000 for personal injuries 
resulting from an accident which occurred in the city of Colon, Republic of Panama. 
Complaint was filed in the Cristobal Division of the District Court on July 3, 1915. 
The plaintiff obtained a judgment agajnst the railroad company in the sum of SIO.OOO. 
The judgment was allirmed by the United States Circuit Court of Appeals at New 
Orleans, and a writ of error from the Supreme Coiut of the United States was perfected 
by the railroad company: and the Supreme (burt of the United States on March 15, 
1920, affirmed the judgment of the trial court, and thereafter the said judgment was 
fully satisfied by tlu^ Panama Railroad Company. 

LAND LITIGATION OF THE PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY. 

The case of the Panama Railroad Company v. A. S. Mendez et al. still remained 
pending upon the docket of the District Court of the Canal Zone, Cristobal division. 
This suit was instituted by the railroad company on March 6, 1912, to recover cer- 
tain lands lying to the east of the railroad line between Colon and Moimt Hope. Some 
time after the President's depopulation order of December 5, 1912, was issued the 
railroad company asked for the dismissal of this case without prejudice on the ground 
that the United States had taken over this property and that the defendants had 
filed their claims before the joint commission for damages on account of the fact that 
the Government had taken over the land. The motion was denied by the court. 
The claim of A. S. Mendez and others was tried by the joint commission and was 
dismissed for want of merit by that body under a rule made on July 2, 1918, which 
fact had lieen brought to the attention of the district court by means of a memoran- 
dum filed by the district attorney as well as by the defendant company. This case 
ought not to remain upon the docket of the district court. 

The case of the Panama Railroad Company v. Eufracio C. de Villalobos and Por- 
firio Melendez also remains pending upon the docket of the District Court of the 
Canal Zone, Cri8to])al division. This was a suit filed by the railroad company on 
March ], 1912, for the recovery of certain lands at or near Toro Point. After the suit 
was filed, Porfirio Melendez entered his disclaimer, stating that he had no interest 
in the subject matter of the litigation. The land involved in the suit was taken over 
by the United States and was ciedicated to the military reservation of Fort Sherman, 



REPORT OP SPECIAL ATTORNEY. 293 

and is now used as such reservation. This fact was called to the court's attention 
by the railroad company and a motion was filed upon that ground by the company 
asking for a dismissal of the case without prejudice. Soon after the joint commission 
was organized in 1913, the Villalobos family filed a claim before that body asking for 
damages against the United States for the same property, and this fact has been called 
to the attention of the district court, but no action has been taken by the court thereon. 
The V'illalobos family failed to appear for the trial of the claim before the joirt com- 
mission and an absolute rule of default was entered against them in due order by the 
joint commission. This case ought not to continue upon the docket of the district 
court. 

The case of Louis Reina v. Panama Railroad Company et al., civil docket No. 305, 
was filed on November S, 1919, in the Cristobal division of the district court of the 
Canal Zone. This is a suit to establish the petitioner's interest in the land known as 
'Rio Indio and Mindi," situated between Foiks River and Gatun. The issues in 
this case were fully disposed of in the case of Tomas Reina r. Beatrice Rracho et al., 
and the Panama Railroad Company, civil docket No. 139, which was disposed of in 
the district court of the Canal Zone, Cristobal division, by a judgment of dismissal 
against the plaintiff, and which jiidgment was affirmed by the United States Circuit 
Court of Appeals at New Orleans on March 25, 1919. The land involved in the suit 
was taken over by the United States about five years ago, and Louis Reina, the plain- 
tiff in the case now pending in the district court, division of (^ristobal, together 
with a number of other claimants, filed their claims with the joint commission seeking 
an award for damages against the United States. 

The claim has been satisfied either by award or by direct settlement by the United 
States with the claimants, with the exception of the small claim of Louis Reina and 
Tomas Reina, his brother. Louis Reina and Tomas Reina failed to appear before the 
joint commission on the day set for the trial of their claim and an absolute rule of 
default was entered against them by that tribunal. The district court of the Canal 
Zone is without jurisdiction to entertain the suit of Louis Reina agairst the Panama 
Railroad Company for the reason that the United States had taken over the property 
years before the institution of the suit, and further, an attempt to prosecute the suit in 
district court of the Canal Zone in 1916 failed for the want of jiu'isdiction of the court, 
and though the parties adverse to the railroad and the United States appealed their 
case to the Court of Appeals at New Orleans, they were unsuccessful, and that court 
held that inasmuch as their claim was pending before the joint commission, that that 
tribunal had the exclusive jurisdiction of the subject matter. In my opinion, the 
suit now pending was instituted for the purpose of harassing the Government into a 
settlement satisfactory to .the attorney for the claimant. 

PA.V.\MA HAILROAI) COMPANY LITIGATION' PENDING IN THE COUKTS OF PANAMA. 

The Panama Railroad ('ompany retains special counsel in the Republic of Panama 
to aid in defending the companv's interests before the courts and departments of the 
Republic of Panama. The enforced collection of rentals from lessees of the coni- 
pany's lots in the cities of Panama and Colon is accomplished through the Panaman 
attorney. In several instances it was necessary to institute suits in order to recover 
the rent and obtain possession of the land from delinquent lessees, and on occasions 
action had to be taken through the various administrative departments of Panama 
and Colon to protect the company's possession of its real estate in those two cities. 

The Javillo Realty (V). filed a suit against the Patiama Railroad 
Company on January 19, 1020, in the court of the first ( ircuit of the 
city of Panama to recover from the Panama Railroad Company a 
tract of land consisting of 4,000 square meters adjoining the site of 
the American pier on the shore front of Panama Bay. This prop- 
erty is in the possession of the Panama Railroad Company and is 
occupied by various parties under license from the railroad company. 

Some years a^o Messrs. Rodriguez & Uribc, of which firm Mr. 
Jose Rodriguez R. was a member, entered into a contract with the 
Panama Railroad Company by which the railroad permitted Rod- 
riguez & Uribe to use its tracks in hauling matt^rial from Diablo 
Hdl for the purpose of filling in and reclaiming about 8 or 9 acres 
in the area lying between the city market and the city of Panama 
and 'the Aarerican pier. In rettirn for the use of the railroad tracks 



294 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

as well as for the material taken from Diablo Hill, Rodriguez & 
Uribe agrood to fill in and reclaim the area in front of the railroad 
comj)any's j)roj)erty adjoinnig th(> American j)ier, and this is the 
area which the Javillo Realty Co. is now seeking to to recover from 
the Panama Raihoad Company. The fill could not have been made 
at all without the use of the Panama Railroad Company's tracks, as 
the cost of the fill otlierwise would have been prohibitive. The 
contract between Roch'iguez & Fribe and the railroad company, by 
which the former was to reclaim the area in cjuestion for the latter, 
was duly recorded and was brought to the attention of the Panaman 
GovernmcMit ])y the (lovernor of The Panama Canal, who rec[uested 
the Panaman Government to respect the rights of the Panama Rail- 
road Conu)any under the contract. T^ater, when deeds were executed 
for all of the i-eelaimed area, the subsecretary of Fomento of Panama 
deeded to the Javillo iiealty Co. the 4,000 square meters which be- 
longed to the l^anama Railroad Company, and tho suit now pending 
against the railroad comj)any is based upon that deed. 

In instituting the suit on- behalf of the Javillo Realty Co., Mr. 
Jose Rodriguez R. alleged that the 4.000 square meters in dispute 
were worth ?i;3,()00. But the deed that the Javillo Realty Co. re- 
ceived from the subsecretary of fomento fixed its value at $85,750. 
This discre])ancy was called to the at t (nit ion of the coiu't, and the 
Javillo Realty Co. was asked to file a bond in conformity with the 
value of the i)roperty as stated in the deed and not as set forth in 
the railroad company's complaint filed in the com't. The Panamau 
court agreed with our contention and has required the Javillo Realty 
Co. to file a bond in the sum of $8,500, in conformity with the law of 
civil procedure of Panama. The bond has not been filed, and in all 
likelihood will not be filed, inasmuch as the Panaman law requires 
either a money deposit or a mortgage bond. There is no merit in 
the suit and it will doul)tless be dismissed in tlie near futur(\ 

LE(jjsi.A'ri().\. 

There was but one act of Congress enacted during the fiscal year 
just ended which was limited in its scope to the Canal Zone. Sev- 
eral congressional enactments of a general character were enacted 
by Congress which applied to the Canal, siich as the various appro- 
priation acts, and some others of a general nature. The act of 
Congress of special application to the Canal Zone just referred to 
is entitled : 

\n act to remove a certain tract or lots of land in Cristobal, Canal Zone, ironi the 
operation and effect of the Executive order of the President of December 5, 1912. 
pursuant to the act of Confrress of August 24. 1912 ( Tliirty-seventh Statutes, chapter 
:i90 , page 565) . A ppro ved . .T u n e 5 , 1 920 . 

The purpose of the act was to restore to the Panama Railroad 
Company its titl(> and possession in the Masonic Temple and the lots 
upon which it is situated in the town of Cristobal, Canal Zone, so 
that the Panama Railroad Company might be free to dispose of this 
property to the Sojourners Lodge of Cristobal. The property is 
bounded on the north by Eleventh Street of the city of Colon, and 
on the east by Bolivar Street of the? same city, and on the south by- 
lot numbered (»4'.». ('ristobal, and on the west by a vacant lot. * 



REPORT OF SPECIAL ATTORNEY. 295 

Soveral Exocutivo orders wore issiiod by tlio President whicli were 
prepared in tliis oHiee or siihmitied to tliis oflice for its examination 
before tbey were forwardcnl to Wasliino;t()n. Tbese orders consisted 
of the following: 

An Execntive order, (hited I)e('enii)er 22. 1919, setting aside for 
a military reservaticm tlie area designated as "Quarry Heights." 
This area is occupied by the (piartei's of th(> commanding general 
and his stafl". 

On Decemb(^r 22. 1919, the President set aside an area at Gatun 
for military purposes, under the designation of "Fort William D. 
Davis." 

On Decend)er .">(). 1919, the Prt^sident issued an Executi\'e order 
setting aside various areas under the d(>signati(ms of "Fort (^layton." 
"Tlie Panama Arsenal,'" "'i'he Engineers I)e])ot,"' and tlu^ "Post of 
Oorozal." Tliese areas are located on th(> ]-*acihc side of the (^inal 
Zone and lie between the Oorundu River and Miraflor(>s. 

Again on April 9, 1920, the President set aside the reservations 
known as "Fort Kandolph," and "France Field," on the Atlantic 
side of the Canal Zone, and to tlie east of the city of (\)lon. 

On January 9, 1920, an FJxecutive order relating to costs in the 
courts of the Canal Zone was issued by the President. Litigation in 
the Canal Zone courts has increased very materially in the last few 
years, and this litigation is not limited to cases arising within the 
Canal Zone, but involve suits that should more properly be brought 
in the courts of the Republic of Panama. The intent of the Execu- 
tive order is to restrict this litigation by limiting the privilege of suing 
in forma pauperis to citizens of the United States, as is done in the 
Federal courts of the United States. Heretofore the litigants in civil 
cases in the Canal Zone courts could demand trial ]\v jury ^^ithout 
depositing a jury fee. The Executive order requires the payment 
into court of a jury fee of $1 0. This is one-half as much as is required 
in the courts of the United States. It is only fair that litigants should 
contribute in some degree to the costs of litigation. Jury trials in the 
Canal Zone are very expensive to the Government and the Panama 
Railroad Company, inasmuch as the juries are necessarily made up of 
Panama Canal and Panama Railroad Company employees who are 
taken from their work to the detriment of the service. 

The act of Congress known as the "Volstead Act," which regulates 
the manufacture, production, use, and sale of high-proof spirits for 
other than beverage purposes, and to insure an ample supply of al- 
cohol and promote its use in scientific research and in the develop- 
ment of fuel, dye, and other lawful industries, effective October 28, 
1919, provides that the enforcement of the act in the Canal Zone shall 
be under the control of the President, who is authorized to establish 
suitable regulations for that purpose. On tlanuary 7, 1920, the Pres- 
d ent issued an Executive order, entitled : 

Executive order establishing prohibition repulatioiiH for tht- Canal Zont^ in con- 
formity with the act of OonRress. 

By virtue of this order, the administration of the regulations is 
placed in the chief health officer of The Panama Canal under the 
direction of the Governor. The order prohibits the importation of 
intoxicants into the Canal Zone, except under the conditions pre- 
scribed in the order; that is to say, liquors for sacramental, scientific, 



296 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

industrial, pharmrtceiitical, and medicinal purposes, may be intro- 
duced under the conditions prescril)ed in the Executive order. Pun- 
ishment bv a line of not more than $1,000 and imprisonment of not 
exceedinoj six months for the first offense, and by a fine of not less than 
$200 or more than $2,000 and imprisonment of not less than one 
month nor more than five years for a second and subsequent offense 
is prescribed in the order in conformity with the act of Congress. 

()n February 11, 1920, the President issued an Executive order 
authorizing charges for services rendered by the quarantine division 
of The Panama Canal. By virtue of this order, the Governor may, 
from time to time, establish a schedule of charges to cover services 
rendered by the quarantine division of The Panama Canal in the dis- 
infection of vessels and their cargoes, for the transportation and sub- 
sistence of passengers while in quarantine, for placing guards aboard 
vessels when necessary, and for the inspection of vessels outside of the 
regular hours. These charges shall he paid to The Panama Canal by 
the person or interest receiving such service. All the laws, ordi- 
nances, and regulations in conflict with the order are repealed. 

On March 1, 1920, the President set aside a part of the Punta Mala 
Lighthouse Reservation for the purpose of the Punta Mala Naval 
Radio Station, subject to the civil jurisdiction of the Canal Zone 
authorities. The lighthouse reservation, from which the site for the 
naval radio station was taken, was designated by an Executive order 
of the President some years ago. Tlie area set apart for the radio 
station is approximately 13.7 acres. 

The Executive order of November 7, 1913, and other laws, orders, 
and regulations relating to the keeping and carrying of arms in the 
Canal Zone, did not meet the present conditions existing in the 
Canal Zone. The opening up of large areas by the cattle industry and 
the depopulation of towns along the Canal and the railroad, the occu- 
pancy of considerable districts of the Canal Zone by the Army, and 
other changes in conditions here, required an amendment in the law^s 
bearing on the carrying and keeping of arms. In consequence, upon 
the recommendation of the Canal Zone authorities, the President 
issued an P^xecutive order on March 6, 1920, to regulate the carrying 
and keeping of arms. This order repeals all previous laws, orders, 
and regulations. Its {)rovisions are much more elastic than those 
found in the preexisting laws; and the Governor is given a wider 
latitude in withdrawing or extending the rules prescribed by the 
order to the various sections of the Canal Zone. The Executive order 
is based on secticm 4 of th(> act of (-ongress authorizing the President 
to make rules and regulations relative to police powers in the Canal 
Zone, approved August 21, 1916. 

Experience had demonstrated that the quarantine regulations 
adopted for the Canal Zone and harbors of the cities of Panama and 
Colon were too rigid. These regulations were an adaptation of the 
(quarantine regulations in force in continental United States. The 
operations of 'fho Panama Canal developed conditions with respect 
to quarantine that are not to be found elsewhere, and it is fair to 
assume that new conditions will continue to arise, and in order to 
meet them an elastic system of regulations, within the control of the 
Governor, are necessary. The chief ([uarantine officer, after several 
conferences with this office, submitted new regulations, which met 



BEPORT OF SPECIAL ATTORNEY. 297 

with the Governor's approval and were forwarded by him to the 
President with tlie recommenchition that tliey })e promulgated in lieu 
of all preexisting regulations. Pursuant to the Governor's reeom- 
mendation, the President, on March 81, 1920, issued an Executive 
order establishing maritime quarantine regulations for the Canal 
Zone and harbors of the cities of Panama and Colon, Republic of 
Panama, and all laws, orders, and regulations in conflict with that order 
were thereby repealed. The Executive order grants to the Governor 
authority to establish from time to time the necessary rules for the 
enforcement of the regulations esta])lished by the Executive order, 
and in doing this many provisions of the old law are eliminated, and 
their omission from the law will be supplied from time to time, when 
the needs of the Canal demand it, by rules to be issued by the Governor 
of The Panama Canal. 

This office also disposed of a number of matters of an advisory 
character during the fiscal year at the request of the Governor, the 
heads of departments, and divisions of The Panama (^inal and the 
Panama Railroad Company, and the Washington authorities. 
Respectfully, 

Frank Feuillf,. 

Special Attorney. 

Brig. Gen. Chester HAiiuiNCi, United States Army, 
Governor, The Panama Canal, 

Balhoa Height fi, Canal Zone. 



AI'PKXDIX r. 

KEPORT OF THE CHIEF HEALTH OFFICER. HEALTH 
DEPARTMENT. 



BAi.iioA Hkights, Canal Zonk, July 20, 1920. 
Siji: I have tlio honor to submit the following rej)ort of tho opera- 
tions of tho licalth depart niont for tho fiscal yoar 1020: 

Gexekal Kk.makks. 

One case of yollow fovor off a ship from Corinto, Nicaragua, vva- 
admitted to Balboa ([uarantine August 10. 1919. This was a bov 
who had contracted tho disease in Leon, Nicaragua. He died two 
days later at Ancon Hospital. There have beeu no cases of yellow 
fever originating on the Isthmus since 1905. 

Eleven cases of leprosy wore a(hiiitted to Palo Soco Lopoi- Asylum, 
all from the Canal Zone luid tho Repu})lic of Panama. 

An influenza oj)idemic started the first part of iVEarch, 1920. C<ises 
of. influenza and deaths from influenza and pneumonia wore reported, 
as follows: Marcli, SOI cases and 50 deaths; April, 314 cases and 52 
deaths: May, 40 cases and 24 deaths: June, 138 cases and 7 deaths. 
The first cases were from Colon but later cases were reported from 
all parts of tho Canal Zone and Panama and its suburbs. The 
schools, motion picture shows, and other places of assembly were closed 
for a period of two weeks. Tho majority of cases I'eported were among 
people who wore ill-fed and physically weak- owing to their poverty — 
which condition was markedly prevalent immediately after the strike 
of February 24 to March 4. The epidemic probably started from 
the fleet of United States Naval vessels station(>d in Colon bay from 
February 19 to ^March 1, of which the steamship Calomhia had 10 
cases and the steamship P(nn>iylv!,n%a 5 cases of infhienza on board; 
the fleet reported 30 cases before arrival in Colon. The rise shown 
in number of cases reported during tho month of Juno was tho result 
<jf a local epidemic at the cattle pasture camp at Manawa — there 
being 82 cases from this camp dui-ing Juno. On Afarch 21, 1920, a 
ship from Ecuadoi- was received at Balboa ([uarantino with six case-s 
of nifluonza on board: Juno 23, 1920, a ship from Peru was received 
ftt this station with 2.3 cases on board; in ])oth cases the hx'al passen- 
gers were detained in (quarantine tln^oo days, and crew and othei- 
contacts amoni' agents and port emj)loyees were observed and 
temperatures taKon for three days. No new cases developed. 

There wore 28 cases of smallpox' reported during the year. All 
were of a benign type, and no deaths resulted. Systematic vacci- 
nation was continueu in tho cities of Panama and Colon, and a va<'- 
<'inator was sent to some of tho interior towns of Panama, porforniing 
29S 



REPORT OF CHIEF HEAiiTH OFFICER. 



299 



vaccinations on all noninmiiincs that could ho reached. Tlioro 
were 2 cases in hospital on June 30, 1020. 

No other maritime ([uarantinahle diseases t'nan tliose ahove enu- 
meratefl arrived at or originated on the fsthmus during the year. 

A free Aenereal disease clinic where ])oth curative and prophy- 
lactic treatments are given, was estahlislied at Santo Tomas Hospital 
in Panama on August 25, 1919, and one at Colon — maintained l)y 
the American National Red Cross -on March 1, 1920. vVn e(hu-a- 
tional campaign has ])een pushed, pamphlets distri])uted in English 
and Spanish, and moving |)ictures dealing with this ([uestion shown 
A notice, warning against all prostitutes, is handed l)y the ([uarantine 
officers to tlie crews of all incoming vessels. Meetings witli Panaman, 
Canal Zone, military officials, and representative citizens have been 
held at which the program of attack as carried out in the United 
States was approved as the program for the Isthmus. However, 
as yet conditions in Panama and Colon remain basically unchanged. 
The standard forms of laws for the repression of prostitution and 
conti'ol of venereal diseases as compiled l)y the commission on train- 
ing camp activities of the War and Navy De])artments, were long ago 
sul)mitted to tne officials of the Panaman Government uj)on their 
I'cquest, but they have not seen fit to pass aiw laws modeled upon 
them. A number of alien prostitutes have been deported to their 
native countries, but prostitutes are still numerous in the two termi- 
nal cities. The incidence of venereal disease is very high in this por- 
tion of the world, and the Qxisting conditions are deplorahly unsatis- 
factory. The health dei)artment is powerless to control the high 
incidence of venereal disease without the cooperation of Panaman 
authorities able and willing to pass and enforce ])roper laws for its 
control. 

The following table shows tiie probable place of infection of all 
malaria cases reported during the past two years : 





Erapl 


oyees. 


Nonem 


ployees. 


Total. 




1920 


1919 


1920 


1919 


1920 


1919 


Sanitated areas of the Canal Zone . - 


202 

149 

12 

54 

49 


184 
292 
21 
36 
32 
32 


407 
8 
20 
52 
79 

261 


779 
35 
90 
03 
110 
550 


609 
157 
32 
106 
128 
338 


963 


Pasture camps and plantations 


327 


Other are IS in the Zone, outside smitated districts "... 
c.olon . . . 


111 
99 


Panama 


142 


Are^s o.itside the Zone and the terminal cities 2 


582 


Total 


543 


597 


827 


1,627 


1,370 


2,224 







1 There are iiractically no residents in these areas. All eases reported were re'^idenfs of the Zone or termi- 
nal ^ities who received their infect ion whilehunting, riding, etc. 

- These oases are from interior towns, other countries, steamships, etc. 

The average total number of employees during this fiscal year was 
21,716, of whom an average of 881 were employed at cattle pasture 
clearing and on plantations during the year. This gives an annual 
rate per thousand for the two tenninal cities and the sanitated area 
of the Canal Zone, for employees only, of 14.64 in 1920, as compared 
with 10.81 in 1919, while the rate for the pasture camps and planta- 
tions, for emplovees only, was 169.18 in 1920, as compared with 
240.^:} in 1919. ■ 



,S00 J'HE PANAMA CANAL. 

While apparcutly decreasing, the infant mortality continuet; high. 
Several factors contribute to this high rate, chiefly ignorance and 
poverty, and the hygienic and dietic errors that accompany these, 
(^hildren of white American parentage living in the Zone do excep- 
tionally well. 

Pneumonia continues to be one of the chief causes of death, espe- 
cially in the densely populated sections of Panama and Colon where, 
in spite of efiorts to improve ventilation and lighting, many employees 
and their families are herded together in entirely inadequate (luarters. 
It is a matter of frec[uent comment b}' Canal Zone physicians that 
sickness is far less prevalent in the modern, well-planned Canal 
quarters than in the tenements of the two cities. 

The highest death rate of the Isthmus is still due to tuberculosis, 
to which disease also applies what has been said of pneumonia. In 
recent years a reduction in the number of cases is apparent, but no 
radical improvement in this condition may be expected until the hous- 
ing situation in Panama and Colon is materially improved, adequate 
hospital facilities provided, and a comprehensive plan of campaign 
of education and prophylaxis developed. A number of the tenement 
houses in Colon and Panama have been remodeled for the purpose of 
admitting sufficient light and ventilation. Pamphlets explaining 
the dangers and precautious necessary in combating the spread of 
this disease have oeen distributed freely. This educational measure 
is being further augmented at Colon by a visiting nurse who gives 
instructions, both oral and written, to the responsible members of 
the family about the precautions necessary to prevent the transmis- 
sion of tlie disease to other members of the family. There is a real 
pressing necessity for more quarters being constructed of the right 
kind for our "silver" employees, such as are provided at La Boca on 
the Pacific side, Red Tank at Pedro Miguel, and Silver City at Cristo- 
bal. La Boca, especiallv, is a model town of its kind, with wide, 
well-paved streets, planting spaces and lawns, screened houses with 
modern plumbing, and a well-supplied commissary and restivjrant. 
By constant supervision and training the colored population of this 
city has been given an education in sanitation that is evidenced in 
their appearance and surroundings and which could well be emulated 
by people of a relatively higher social strata and culture. 

' Anotner eu'ort on the part of The Panama Canal to improve living 
conditions for its laborers, especially those whose employment is of a 
temporary nature, is seen in the reopening of a portion of the Zone 
to unemployed, able-bodied men, who are given (quarters and a gener- 
ous portion. of land to cultivate, in return for which a nominal rent 
is paid and the tenant obligates himself to work for The Panama 
Canal a stated portion of the year, if called upon, at the regular rate 
of pay for labor of the kind he performs. The old town of Las 
Cascadas, on the west bank of the Canal, since construction days and 
until recently used as an Army post, has been assigned for this mir- 
pose, as here are already available quite a number of houses and an 
adequate water supply. If the unemployed Negro can be induced to 
take advantage of this proposition, it will help solve one of our most 
difficult problems— that of providing a reservoir of labor for emer- 
gency use -that will be self-supporting between periods of employ- 
ment. • 



REPORT OP CHIEF HEA1.TH OFFICER. "301 

Wlieie it is possible to do so, employeos living in regular Zone 
settlements are encouraged to engage in gardening outside of work- 
ing hours, and adjacent tracts of land are designated for this purpose. 
As drainage operations advance, more and more ground is made avail- 
able for cultivation, and it is hoped that ultimately every family that 
so desires may have their own garden spot where a greater part of 
their food can be grown. 

ViTAi- Statistics. 

EMPLOYEES. 

A new method of finding the average number of employees was 
adopted during the fiscal year. In previous years the total number 
of names on the pay rolls each month was taken as the number of 
employees, and the average force was considered as the average of 
the 12 monthly statements. Inasmuch as many of the silver-roll 
employees were in casual employment and their names appeared 
twice or several times on the rolls, the average thus deduced was 
larger than the facts warranted. It was, therefore, decided to 
consider the average force as that represented by the number actually 
at work on the second and last Wednesday of each month, except that 
in the case of the docks and coaling plants the average force for the 
month is used. The result of this change of method has been to 
make our basis for statistics of employees more accurate than here- 
tofore, but it has also resulted in giving a base for 1920 which is not 
properly comparal)le with that for the previous years. 

In determining the division b}^ race, a careful study of the silver- 
roll force was made to determine how many persons properly classed 
as "white" are in that force. It was decided to use 500 as the 
number. Our segregation by race is, therefore, determined by sub- 
tracting 500 from the silver-roll numbers and adding 500 to the 
gold-roll numbers. 

The average number of employees on the rolls of The Panama 
Canal and the Panama Railroad for the year was 21,716, as compared 
with 20,172 for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1919. 

The total admission rate to hospitals and quarters was 658.45, as 
compared witli. 617.79 for the fiscal year ended June 80, 1919. The 
total admission rate to hospitals only for the year was 225.69, as 
compared with 235. S2 for 1919, and for disease alone 192.48, as com- 
pared with 204.09 for 1919. 

The total death rate for 1920 was 9.49, as compared with 8.43 for 
1919. The noneii'ective rate for 1920 was 14.85, as compared with 
16.87 for 1919. 

The total admission rate for malaria, hospitals, and cj^uarters, was 
25, as compared with 29.60 for 1919. The constantly noneffective 
rate, hospital and quarters, was 0.70, as against 0.74 for 1919, and 
0.72 for 1918. 

The admission rate for typhoid fever was 0.18, as against 0.10 
for 1919; there were no deatlis from typhoid fever in the years 1918, 
1919, and 1920. 

The death rate from tuberculosis (various organs) was 1.43, as 
compared with 1.49 for 1919, The death rate from pneumonia (lobar) 
was 0.83, as against 0.99 for 1919. 



302 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



The five diseases eausino; the higliest nuinl)er of hospital achniasions, 
with their rates, were as follows: 



Induenza 

Venereal (iis3ases 

Malaria 

Diseases ot t he eyes and theirannexa 
Tuberculosis 



The five diseases causing- the highest number of deaths, with their 
rates, were as foUow^s: 



Number of hospital 
admissions. 


Rate per 1,000. 


1918-19 


1919-20 


1918-19 


1919-20 


596 
459 
516 
124 
52 


604 
548 
503 
156 

47 


29.55 

22.75 

25.58 

6.15 

2.58 


27.81 

25.23 

23.16 

7.18 

2.16 



Number of deaths. Rate per 1,000. 



1918-19 1919-20 I 1918-19 1919-20 



Tuberculosis (variousorgaus) 

Pneumonia (broncho and lobar). 

Influneza ' 

Chronic nephritis 

Organic diseases of the heart 



1.49 
1.19 



1.43 
1.15 

.97 

.87 
.46 



1 Many deaths are reported as "Influenzal pneumonia"; until the present year these were classified as 
"pneumonia," which accounts for no deai hs from influenza among employees for last year. 



EFFECTS OF RACE. 

For disease only, the admission rate to hospitals and the death 
rate for white employees was 287.16 and 3.37, as compared with 
168.10 and 9.32 for 'black employees. The noneffective rate for 
disease and injm-ies for w^hite employees was 18. 11, as compared with. 
14.01 for black employees. 

CANAL ZONE. 

The average population for the Canal Zone for the year w^as 30,954, 
as compared wdth 21,707 for the last year. Military population is 
included in the report for tliis year; during the period ot the war the 
military population was not included in any of the statistical rates of 
this report, except in the table under sanitation showing total malaria 
cases and percentages. 

From this population 253 deaths occurred during the year, 219 of 
which were from disease, giving a rate of 7.08 for disease alone, as 
compared with 9.40 for 1919. 

The death rate from tuberculosis w^as 0.81, as compared with 1.34 
for the year 1919. Deaths from tuberculosis this year w^re 10 per 
cent of all deaths. 

The birth rate for the year was 22.26. The infant mortality rate, 
based on the number of births reported for the year, was 34 for white 
and 153 for black children, with a general average of 110.30. Of the 
total births reported, 6 per cent were stillbirths. 

Of the total deaths reported, 45 per cent occurred among children 
under five years of age. 



REPORT OF CHIEF HEALTH OFFICER. 



303: 



PANAMA CITY. 

The average population of th(> city for the yciar was 61,369, the 
census not having been taken since June, 1917. From this popula- 
tion, 1,278 deatlis occurred during the year, of which 1,234 were from 
disease, giving a rate of 20.11 for disease alone, as compared with 
21.85 for the preceding year. Tuberculosis gaA^e a death rate of 
3.80, as compared with 4.30 for 1919 and 4.53 for 1918; this was 18 
per cent of the total deaths, as compared with 19 per cent for last 
year. 

The principal causes of death, compared with last year, were as 
follows: 



1919-20 



Tuberculosis (various organs) . . 
Pneumonia fbroncho anil lobar) 
Diarrhea and entoritis 




There were 2,393 births reported for the year, giving a rate of 
38.99. The infant mortality rate, based on the above number of 
births was 150.44. Of the total number of births reported 8 per 
cent were stillbirths. 

Of the total deatlis reported 42 per cent occurred among children 
under five years of age. 

COLON. 



The average population of the city for the year was 26,078, the 
census not havmg been taken during the past year. From this 
population, 567 deaths occurred during the year, of which 527 were 
from disease, giving a rate of 20.21 for disease alone, as compared 
with 23.28 for the preceding j^ear. 

The principal causes of death as compared with last year were: 





1918-19 


1919-20 




108 
38 
89 


101 




56 




47 







Tuberculosis (various organs). . , 
Nephritis (acute and chronic) . . , 
Pneumonia (broncho and lobar) 



There were 1,001 births reported for the 3^ear, giving a rate of 38.38. 
The infant mortality rate, based on the number of births, was 136.86. 
Of the total births reported, 5 per cent were stillbirths. 

Of the total deaths, 38 per cent occurred among chihh'en under 5 
years of age. 

ANCON HOSPITAL. 

[Col. Louis T. Hess, U. S. A., Superintendcnl.] 

Permanent huildings. — ^Thc bakeshop, located in the kitchen mess 
halls building, was found unsatisfactory for the purpose designed 
owing to cramped space, inconvenient location of ovens, and lack 
of insulation in ceiling over ovens, upon which is situated the floor 
of the diet kitchen; it was evacuated as such and occupied by the 
general mechanic as a workshop and storeroom. All bakeshop 



304 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

apparatus w as dismantled and will })0 roinstalled in that part of the 
power plant building now housing the carpenter and electrical shops. 
A two-storv addition to the power plant building is being erected, 
the ground floor of wdiich is for the carpenter shop — twice as large 
as the former shop; the second floor will be used for electrical shop 
and electrical stores and for tl.e miscellaneous general supplies of 
carpenters, painters, and plumbers. 

Building 210, maids' quarters, was removed from its former 
location and is now situated to the right of the laboratory in what 
was foi-merly the poultry yard. 

BuiUling 246, wdiich was used as a chronic ward, was razed by the 
su])ply department for reerection at one of their plantations, and the 
chronics were transferred to Corozal Hospital. 

Roads. — In order to reduce to a minimum all noise nuisances, the 
main hospital road, which is now named "Gorgas Road, " was made a 
one-way road, downhill only, and the hospital interior road closed 
to public traflic. 

Grounds. — All lawns liavo been graded and sodded, and many 
flower beds, plants, trees, and hedges have been set out around the 
hospital buildings. Considerable work has also been done on the 
liillside in the rear of the hospital buildings. Rocks have been picked 
oft" to fill depressions at foot of the hill, which have then been graded 
off with dirt dressing. One hundred orange trees, 50 grapefruit trees, 
and 25 avocado trees have been set out on this hillside. 

Surgical clinic. — During the year 1,994 major operations and 4,831 
minor operations were performed. There were 3,134 cases visited 
the put-patient department; 314 obstetrical cases were delivered. 

Medical clinic. — There were 2,611 cases treated in the out-patient 
department, for whom 1,707 prescriptions were wTitten. 

Eye and ear clinic. — There were 7,443 cases examined or treated 
in tiie out-patient department, for whom 2,606 prescriptions were 
written, 967 refractions were made, and 976 operations performed. 

X-ray clinic. — A total of 3,333 cases were handled; 7,197 plates 
and 1,708 dental films were taken and 84 treatments given. The 
following new apparatus was installed in Ancon Hospital X-ray 
laboratory during the year: One bedside X-raj^ unit, for service in the 
hospital at bedside of patients; 1 United States Base Hospital trocho- 
sco])e; 1 Jiorizontal plate changer for chest plates, wdth stereographic 
tube stand; an overhead high-tension switch; new screens, tunnels, 
and reels. In addition, some improvements were made on the 
vertical fluoroscope and on the stereoscope, bringing them up to date. 

Steward's department. — During the year the patients' dining rooms 
for white and colored males w^erc put in service. There were H)4,218 
rations issued to Ancon Hospital patients and 92,790 rations to per- 
sonnel entitled to same, a total of 257,008 rations; the net cost of 
same was $101,972.55, exclusive of ]u-ej)aration and serving. 

Maintenance and repairs. — The usual routine repairs were made l)y 
the hospital artisans, and in addition miscellaneous furniture and 
supplies were manufactured and certain changes and additions made 
to buildings, the principal items being sanitary drinking fountains, 
additional sinks, lockers, showier baths, and toilets installed in 
various sections of the hospital; most of the Ijeds, bedside tables,. and 
chairs were reenameled : various doors were lettered; wooden strips 
were ])hic(Ml over screening on \eran(his to j)rotect screening; 127 



REPORT OF CHIEF HEALTH OFFICER. 



305 



coffins were manufactured; also flower stands, tables, and water 
sprinklers; partitions were installed in isolation ward. 

Comparative statistics. — Tiio following table is for Ancon Hospital, 
including Corozal Hospital : 



Patients, iiouresilent of the Canal Zone, Panama, or Co'-on: 

Number almitted 1, 294 

Days treated, total 39, 782 

Military natients: 

Nuinlier a imiltcd 779 

Pays treated, total 14, 672 

All c'asses of patients: 1 

N umber admitted | 10, 393 

Days treated, total | 306, 079 

Cost of s ibsistence supplies per patient per day — AncouHos- i 
pital on'y i SO. 3967 

Cost of treatment of hospital patients, ineluding subsistence, i 
raeiioines, and all attendance — Ancon Hospital only j $3.43 




686 i 
28,089 I 

4,165 i 

49,067 j 

i 

12,436 i 

319,908 I 

S0.315 I 

S2.78 



3f.U 
26, 497 

2,469 
33,494 

11,170 
311,451 

JO. 3369 

n. 35 



BOARD OF HEALTH LABORATORY. 

[Dr. Lewis B. Bates, Chief.] 

The inliuenza epidemic this spring necessitated a large amount of 
laboratory work. Owing to the sudden and temporary increase in 
the malaria rate, mostly at the Atlantic end, just at the beginning of 
the year, an effort was made to ascertain the malaria index of Camp 
Bierd, Cristobal, a laboring camp from which many cases were com- 
ing. Blood films and spleen examinations were made on 514 indi- 
viduals. The splenic index was 13 per cent, the parasite index 0.4 
per cent. The enlarged spleens were mostly found in natives from 
the interior who had been recently employed. 

The determined effort being made by the health officer of Panama 
to give the city of Panama as pure a milk supply as that c^n joyed by 
the Canal Zone and the best-regulated communities in the United 
States has necessitated the bacteriological and chemical examination 
of a large number of milk specimens, and with the continuation of 
this plan this work will become a part of the permanent routine of 
the laboratory. 

There has always been a demand for the laboratory to do a larger 
number of the simpler examinations, such as the examination of blood 
films for malaria parasites, eye smears for the gonococcus, urines for 
albumin, and similar examinations. It has been found advisable for 
the laboratory to meet this demand, and an increasing amount of 
this work is being done. 

The work in the chemical laboratory has been of the usual general 
character. It has included the examination of milks, beverages, 
drugs, canned foods, miscellaneous supplies, as well as clinical exami- 
nations requiring quantitative determinations. As a routine measure, 
toxicological examinations have been made in every instance of death 
from unknown causes. In addition to the work done, preparations 
have been made to extend the scope of the work in blood chemistry 
so that all quantitative determinations for diagnostic purposes may 
be made rapidly and in as large numbers as desired. 
^ The entomological department covered the field of medical, sani- 
tary, and economic entomology, with special reference to the identi- 

8847—20 20 



306 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

licntioii of inosqiiitDOs, of other arthropods aff(u'tin<; the licalth of 
mail ami animals, inspection of nTosf{uito-bree<lin<i; areas, the study 
of insects infestiiig food and stored ])roducts, househohl insects, 
forao;e-crop insects, vegetal)le and truck croj) insects, and thc^ study 
of the more important jn^sts of tropical fruit trees. The work in 
economic (Mitomology was of a cooperative nature with the bureau of 
eutonu)logy. Tnited States Department of Agriculture, which bureau 
had estabhshed a temporary field station at this laboratory and de- 
tailed an entomological inspector of the F'ederal horticultural board in 
charge of the station: upon the de])arture of this insj)ector in August, 
the project was placed t<Mn])orarily in charge of the board of health 
(>ntonu)logist as collaborator of tlu^ bunniu. The nuiin object of tlu^ 
t(Mni)orary held station is to learn what dangerous pests occur in the 
Canal Zone, and whether the concentration of traffic and commerce 
from all j^arts of the world is not adding new and serious ])ests to our 
territory. Such dangerous immigrants, together with the (mdomic 
pests, would be potential menaces to continental United States. 
The surveys and inspections made thus far, covering a period of about 
two years, have yielded a large amount of valuable information 
regarding pests already estal)lish(Ml, and that our piers, especially 
those at Cristobal, are splendid mediums for the introduction into 
the (^mal Zone of new and serious enemies. wSuch insects are also 
a danger to (.)ther cargo on the piers awaithig transshipment because 
it is very easy for eggs or other stages of these insects to reach such 
cargo and thus reach other ports. These facts indicate the necessity 
for a port-inspection and plant-quarantine service, with adequate 
facilities for vacuum fumigations at both terminals, as the only 
means which will ])rotect against such dang(>rous insects. 

The ])rofessional staff of the laboratory remains the same, but the 
number of technicians has been increased to six, on account of the 
in<'reased work. 

COROZAL HOSPITAL. 

[Dr. Louis Wfnd<r, Superintendent.] 

The gemu-al admission rate has been about the same as in pre- 
vious years. On June 30, 1920, there were 844 paticuits in the hospi- 
tal, and 26 chronic crip])les. During the year a large number of 
patients were deported to their native homes. Various forms of 
amusem(>nt have been continued. The occupational de])artment 
where rugs, hats, and other small items have been made, received 
a new im])etus tlu^ lattcn- part of 1919.' The offu'ers of the; Mental 
Hygiene Society in New York sent down, free of charge, an indus- 
trial instructor who remaincxt her(^ thnn^ months, established a 
workroom and instructed the chit^f nurse in the essentials of an 
industrial de])artment. The occupational de])artment has been 
(Established on a liigh standing, as in the bc^st hos])itals in the United 
States. Our i)atients, although of a lower strata, have taken up 
with this work very enthusii'sti<'ally and v.n'. making rugs, toys, 
<-]iildren's furnitiu'e, weaving bags, block ]>rinting, wood carving, 
(ite. Tliis kind of work is very beneficial to this class of patients, as 
it not only n^movc^s tluun temporarily from thviv world t)f fantasy, 
but also reeducates them and stops their mental deterioration. 
Most of the articles made have nu^t a ready sale, ami it is hoped that 
in the future this de])artment will more than ])ay for itself. This 



HKPORT OF CHIEF HEAI^TH OFFICER. 307 

m>w uiuhMtiikiiii:: has liot ouitiulcd jiny of the previous Mork. such as 
farniiui^;, lauudr}' work, or work in the sewing room. Most of the 
maU^ patients are still cultivatinjj; th(^ land: W(> haV(^ opened up 
several a'-res of n(iw land with patient lahor, planting most of it in 
yams. Ma'hiuery for making brooms has ))een ordered sind Avill be 
insta)l(Hi in the next few months. This will neeessitate a building 
and the installation of light ma"hiner}'. In this building we will be 
able to train some of our patiiMits along with the (•ri])])les in various 
kinds of industry. 

Buildings. — The new hosi)itj',l ward "K," which was erected dur- 
ing the year, with a"commodatit)ns for SO ])atients, Wiis occupicul in 
.Tanuary. The ward whic^i W!;,s presiously occu])ied l)y the working 
patients is now used as an isolation ward for tubercular patients 
and two cases of nerve leprosy that ai'e also insan{\ The new ward 
has relieved the congestion to ;>. c(>rtain extent, but it was necessary 
to transfer 26 chronic cripples from Ancon Hos])ital to this hospital, 
in order to complete the removal of old hospital buildings at An''on. 

A road from the dair}' to thc! new feeding platform for pigs was 
built by our own help, and ;>, feed room has been constructed at the 
end of the ])latform. The chicken house was demolished and the old 
lumber used for the constru-tion of n(>w feed room. A fence has 
been l)laced around the ik^w feeding ])latfoim jmkI the use of the 
platform has been started. 

The second-story porches and the roofs over sami^ in most of the 
buildings have been painted. The male and female dining rooms 
and th(i kitchen were also painted. 

An addition has been built to the nurses' (piarters, adding four 
rooms with a front and ba-k porch. The rece])tion room was 
enlarged and refinished. 

A new <'Oid bin has been ))uilt to fariliti'.te the uidoading of the coul 
cars on the siding. 

<r/'ovi/;//.s'. -The grounds in tlu^ hos]>ital inclosure liavc been kept 
in order by the ])atient's help. One thousajid feet of drain has been 
laid in the hospital grounds by them, im]>roving the !'4>])earance of 
the grounds as well iw the sanitation. .Vll the walks in the inclosure 
have been re])aved, and new cement wsUks have been laid around 
the hospital quarters by our ])atients. 

Dairy.- ~r art of our ])astures were cleared during tlu^ yi^ar. On 
December 9, 19 J 9, 25 Ilolstein cows arrived from the States. We 
were unable to obtain them except from the noninfected tick area 
in the States, and it was therefore ne 'c.-^sary to imnumizc them here 
against the ti<-k fever. The inoculation was dom^ by the staff of 
the board of health laboratory: these cows were from 2 to -t years of 
age, and six ilied })robably as a result of the inoculation. One 
registennl Ilolstein bull calf was purchased from the cattle industry 
as sire for this year. .\s this bull was too young, we obtained, 
through the kindnc^ss of Mr. Frank O. Arias, of Panama, the loan of a 
registered Ilolstein bull, without charge, which is Ix^ng used with 
the Holst(Mn cows. 

Part of the equipment for the refrigerating apparatus for the milk 
room has arrived, and we hope to have this installed shortly; tins 
will enable the cooling of the milk to be done by mechanical re- 
frigerating, thus reducing the cost and also lessening the amount of 
handlinjr. 



308 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Our milk h^^ coutiiuuHl to he of {', high sliinchird, being pastour- 
izod morning rnd cvcMiing tiftcr mill<ing; it shows a \o\v bftftorial 
count and a fat ])('r('(>ntj'.gc of 4 to o. 

Tlu^ tu))orculin tost has l)cen ma(h' of all cows. On Juno 30, 1920, 
tho herd consistod of S hulls, 74 cows, r.nd o<S calves. 

Piggery. — Most of our pigs, after being fattened, are sold to the 
supply de]>artment. vSin''e th? early part of November a pig has 
been slaughtonMJ ea'h week for the use of Ancon Hospital. On 
June 30, 1920, we had on hand 27 hogs and 120 pigs. 

Garden. — With the high cost of seed and labor, tho giU'don has 
been a losing proposition, and it was deemed advisable to reorgan- 
ize the farm. This has now been efi'ected; tlio cripples, instead of 
receiving a sr.lary, ar(^ oiven lodging juid subsistence, and a tract of 
land to cultivate as they ph>ase; seeds ar(\ furnished them at cost, 
and sale of their products is handled by the farm. 

We have had no su'cess in raising rabbits for the board of health 
laboratory, as most of them die of coccydiosis. We are now more 
sucessful than formerly in raising guinea pigs, and our stock is 
gradually in- reasing. 

The number of cripples remaining at the hospital June 30, 1920, 
was 4 white and 27 black, being a redwtion of 21 during the year. 

COLON HOSPITAL. 

\Maj. Guy L. Quails, U. S. A., Superintendent.] 

Colon disponsiiry, which is located within the hospital, is under 
the direction of the hospital, and it is necessary to correlate and 
harmonize the work of the dispensar}" with that of the hospital. 
The Colon district physi'ian has charge of the medical cases in hospi- 
tal. One of the stall" physicians and the medical interne assist the 
district physi'ian in this' work. The superintendent has charge of 
surgi'-al cases and supervises all work of the hospital and dispensary. 

Emergencv cases from the dispensary are admitted to Colon 
Hospitil: others, both medical and surgical, are transferred to Ancon 
or Santo Tomas hospitals. Efforts are made to keep the number of 
patients under treatment at Colon Hospital to 50 or below. 

During the past year much work and effort has been expended 
toward "b3:iutifying tho hospital grounds. Considerable dirt fill 
will bo necossary in the near future in front of the hospital if appear- 
ances are kept up to what they should be. At present grass can 
not be grown over tho area nearest th(^ bav on account of lack of 
sufficient earth, the <'.oral formation sup|)orting very little vegetable 
growth. 

The institution is located in an almost ideal place for a tropical 
hospital. The surrounding grounds are ample for a much larger 
institution. It is believed that with the growth of Cristobal, Colon, 
various Ai-mv and iVavy j)osts and stations, the increased amount of 
shipping and business on this side of the Isthmus, the demand will 
bo urgent for new cons'tructiou in ovdov that infectious diseases 
originating on this side of the Isthmus and those brought in by ships 
may bo treated here. A ward for tlu^ care of a larger number of 
obstetrical cases will soon be a necessity. 

As the Kopubli(; of Panama docs not maintain a hospital on this 
side of tho Isthmus for the care of its indigents, it is believed that 



REPORT OF CHIEF HEALTH OFFICER. 309 

tlit> installation of a chai'ity ward attached to this hospital and sup- 
ported hy the R(»public of Panama should receive* serious considera- 
tion. 

The hospital building proper has been rescreened during the past 
year and necessary reinfofcements to screening have been placed in 
the wooden framework in order to withstand the strong winds of 
the drv season. This work was done by the hospital artisan, and 
has reduced the cost of renewing screening considcn'ably. 

As mentioned in last yisar's report, the paint on the interior walls 
of the hospital has cracked and peeled off badly. Sufficient funds 
for repainting were not available last year, and with the big cut in 
our estimates, we will probably not be able to paint the interior of 
the hospital this coming yv.nv. 

The reports of professional work of consequence are pid)lished in 
the statistical tables, and it is unnecessary to repeat them here. It 
would also be futile to render them in a more condensed or informa- 
tive manner. 

SANTO TOMAS HOSPITAL. 

[Afaj. E. A. Bocock, U. S. A., Superintendent.] 

Ownig to the many improvements made during the year, this 
institution — of which the superintendent, two physicians, chief 
nurse, and two ward nurses are employees of The Panama Canal — 
deserves special mention. Altiiough the institution is financed by 
the Republic of Panama, with the exception of paying the above 
employees, we are vitally interested in its operation and management. 

Training .school. — On January 30, 1920, the third graduating class 
of the Santo Tomas Hospital Training School for Nurses, consisting 
of nine nurses, finished the course and received their diplomas. This 
makes a total of 28 Panaman nurses who have been graduated from 
this scliool since its beginning. The training school has made steady 
progress throughout tlie entire year. 

General. — The buildings, many of which are very old and practi- 
cally falling down, have been repaired, painted, and rendered habit- 
able for another year. All the debts of the institution, of which there 
were a large number, have been paid during the year and its credit 
reestablished. A practical system of bookkeeping and propert}^ 
accounting has been instituted and a systematic survey of the 
financial and economic situations made and applied. In addition 
to this all attention possible has been devoted to improving the 
professional services of the hospital, and while this is far from feeing 
ideal it is undoubtedly advancing in efficiency. The principal new 
works that have been undertaken during the year were the establish- 
mcMit of the venereal clinic and the beginning of construction of the 
new Santo Tomas Hospital. 

Venereal clinic. — On August 25, 1919, a venereal clinic was estab- 
lisheil at this hospital, on a plan similar to the clinics conducted by 
the f^ublic Health Service in many parts of the United States. Since 
its beginning this clinic has met with complete and somewhat grati- 
fying success. From September 1, 1919, to elune 30, 1920, therehave 
been 2,134 new admissions to the clinic; of these 1,513 were men and 
621 women. During this period the patients under the care of the 
clinic received 11,241 treatments, dressings, or consultations. Sal- 
varsan to the extent of 568 doses was administered, as well as 762 



310 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

injoctious of mercurv. Surgical opcialioiis numbering MIS wcro 
porformod upon clinic, patients. The troatmeiits given in the clinic 
arc absolutely free to all persons who are unable to pay, but a slight 
charge is made in cases where the patients have some means. Wasser- 
mann examinations are made on practically all j)aiients rej)orting 
to the clinic, and free vSalvai-san is given Avhenever indicated. 

Xew Santo Tottias Ilo.^pUal. — For many years it has been the 
hope of the Panaman Government to construct a new and modern 
institution, l)ut owing to numerous })olitical changes, limincial defi- 
ciencies, etc., it ha« never been possible to make this project a reality 
until the year 1919. At that time the N'ational Treasury of the 
Rcjniblic was receiving approximately S25,()00 per month from the 
lifiuor tax and the national lottery, and with this money it was 
decitled to commence the construction of the new hospital. Several 
sites around the city were investigated and it was finally de('ided to 
construct the new institution at a site known as El Hatillo. which is 
a high point facing the Pacific ocean, in the suburbs of the city of 
Panama. The official ground breaking took place on November 15, 
1919, and since that date active work has been carried on until the 
])resent time, and the construction work is now well underwav. 

The layout of the institution will cover approximately 14 acres, 
or nine 'citv blocks, and when completed will have cost about 
.'i^ 1,000,000. "The buildings, wliich will be 12 in number, will be 
arranged in rectangular form, fronting by the main building which 
will face the sea, and flanked on either side by annexes and contagious 
disease and tubercular sections. The buildings will V)c of reinforced 
concrete and concn^te blocks, and the whole layout will be linked 
together with a meshwork of streets and sidewalks affording easy 
access to every part of the grounds. A retaining sea wall is being 
constructed along the entire frontage of the institution, which will 
control the unusually liigh tide that is present on this part of the 
Pacific coast. The space of 4 acres just between the front of the 
hospital and the sea wall will be occupied by ornamental gardens filled 
with tropical plants and flow(>rs, with a fountain in the ctaiter. From 
Panama City an elegant boulevard is being constructed along the 
seashore to the front of the now institution, and the lands adjacent 
to the hospital gi-ounds are being filled and leveled in order to make 
the surroundings sanitary. 

The main building of "the new hosi)ital will be 210 feet in length, 
60 feet in width, and four stories high, and will be augmented by 
three annexes of practi<-al similar size, which will Ix^ joined by 
."orridors to the main building. The venereal, infections diseases, 
and tubercular sections will b(> separate buildings, or in reality 
liosi)itals in themselves, (>ach having a cal)acity of approximately 
100 patients. The total capacity of the entire institution will be 
()()() patients normally, with facilities for emergency crisis expansion 
to 900 patients. Adequate quarters are being provided for the 
several staft's of doctors and nurses, and separate buildings are under 
construction for the laboratory, morgue, power house, kitchen, shops, 
and vehicles. A laimdry and bakery will be included in the utilities 
of the new institution. Classiooms for the nurses training school and 
for the post-gra(luat(^ school of tropical medicine which is contemplated, 
will also ])e included in a separat(^ building. 



REPORT OF CHIEF HEALTH OFFICER. 311 

Modem c([iiipnioiit and fivilitics will bo iustjiUod tlu'oiighout the 
now institution. Sound proof walls, sil(>nt boll-call systom, floor 
lights, and incloscHJ clolhos {'hiitc's will bo installod in each of the 
hospital l)uil(lin<2;s. The hospital will bo ocjuippod with four large 
operating rooms eonnected with the X-ray suite, and the surgical 
equipment in these departments will 1)0 modern in every way. The 
entire fourth tloor of the main ])uilding will be devoted to the surgical 
and X-ray suites, the third and second floors to medi<'al and surgical 
wards, and the first floor to ofhcos, library, and classrooms. The 
entire l)asement of the main Imilding will be occupicnl by the dis- 
pensaries, venereal and dental clinics. A radium department will 
be a featm-e of the surgical suite and hydro and electro therapeutic 
installations will also be added to the institution. 

The appliances and accessories for use in equipping the institution 
will be. purchased new in the United States, and when finished the 
Santo Tomas Hospital will undoubtedly be the finest institution, 
except Ancon Hospital, south of the United States, or a close second 
to any similar general hospital in the world. 

PALO SECO LEPER ASYLIM. 

\ Mr. F. D. Tucker, SupcriiUcndiiit.] 

The number of cases on hand at the first of the year was 76, 
including two temporarily at Ancon Hospital, for treatment of dis- 
eases other than leprosy. There were 11 admissions — three from 
Colon, two from Gatun, one from Empire, four from Panama, and 
one from Juan Diaz, R. P. Three deaths occurred during the year. 
Two patients were paroled: these were afflicted with the nerve type 
of leprosy, which is considered noninfectious; they will report to the 
health department once every six months for examination and 
report as to condition. Four patients were discharged; they were 
in good physical condition and repeated examinations failed to show 
the presence of leprosy bacilli. All the patients paroled or discharged 
were either taken care of by their families or secured promise of em- 
ployment before being discharged. Two patients who were insane 
and suffering from the nerve typo of leprosy, were transferred to 
Corozal Hospital for the Insane. On(> ])ati(nit was deported to his 
home in Martinique, and one to Barbados. There were 74 patients 
in the institutit)n at the close of the year. 

The buildings, walks, fences, etc., have boon kept in good state of 
repair, mostly by patient labor. The interiors of several of the 
buildings were painted. The grounds have been generally improved, 
trees and hedges planted, and a new pier is being built. A new site 
for the institution has b(>en surveycnl on the high plateau in the rear 
of the pi'osent station. 

A distinctive currency for use at this institution only was put into 
circulation; it has the iulvantage of preventing purchases of licjuor 
from Panama, i)reventing savings for escape, and does away with 
the us(^ by the general population of nu)ney wdiich has boon handled 
by these le])ers. A savings bank was started for the patients, in 
which there are several depositors. 

One wedding took place during the year, and the husband has 
built a cottage for which material was furnished. The whole station 
was interested in this marriage, and the moral effect is good. The 



312 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

question of cliildron was solved by a vasectomy done on the husband, 
upon his written request. 

Farm produce from ])atients' gardens is coming in. We are trying 
to tea'-h better farming by means of the station garden, and we have 
goats and the best breeds of pigs. The ideal is to have the patients 
raise all the food consumed. 

DISTRICT DISPENSAllIES. 

Our district physi'dans have continued to care for the medical 
noeds outside of hos])ital treatment, of employees, their families, 
ships passing through the canal, etc., in a satisfactory and efficient 
manner. Their services to passengers and crews of ships are con- 
stantly increasing. 

DISTRICT DENTISTS. 

Due to the amount of dental work required by employees and their 
families, a third dentist has been authorized for Ancon, who will do 
his work in the same office as one of the ])resent dentists. An addi- 
tional dentist has also been appointed at Colon, and part of old Colon 
Hospital buildings fitted up for his office. We now have a total of 
nine district dentists, all of whom are kept busy. They are now all 
on a no-salary basis. 

wSanitation. 

canal zone. 

[£>r. D. P. Curry, Assistant Chief Health Officer in charge.] 

This consists mainly in antimosquito work, although the duties of 
sanitaiy inspectors are many and varied — antirat work, antifly 
work, inspection of hotels, restaurants, quarters, and barber shops, 
disinfections, maintenance of cemeteries, and general sanitary work. 
The four sanitary districts of the Zone are Ancon, Balboa, Pedro 
Miguel, and Gatun; their territory has not changed during the year, 
with the exception that the former Army post at Las Cascadas is 
now sanitated by our force, as this town was turned over to The 
Pannma Canal and opened up by the supply department for silver 
employees of the Canal. 

The beginning of the fiscal year was marked by a very high malarial 
rate. The undrained swamps in the neighborhood of Colon, Cristobal, 
and Gatun were giving oft" unusual swai-ms of Anopheles alhimanus 
and tarsimaculata. The screens of the Washington Hotel and Colon 
Hospital were so thickly covered that a larvacide spray was used 
repeatedly as the easiest way of destroying the invaders. There 
was no AnopTieles breeding nearer than the Margarita road swamp- 
nearly 2 miles by direct flight fr(mi the hotel, and a mile and a half 
from New Cristobal, with about a mile of open water of Manzanillo 
Bay intervening; there is very little doubt that flight took place over 
this distance from the swamp to the points mentioned. To have 
come from any otiier breeding place they would have had to fly a 
greater distance and over the full length of Colon and Cristobal, the 
intermediate parts of which were free from Anopheles. The prevailing 
winds at this season are variable and light. 

The laborers' settlement of Camp Bierd, the coaling plant, and the 
dry dock, all south of Cristobal, were also heavily infected and 



REPORT OF CHIEF HEAXiTH OFFICER. 313 

Anovih^lcs were found to he coming in great numbers from the swamps 
of Telfers Island and the vicinity of Mount Hope. Sea-level ditches 
were placed in these latter swamps in order to drain the territory 
within a mile of the dry dock and all dairy cattle were removed 
beyond that area. 

The Army sanitary inspector, Mr. J. B. vShropshire. made sea-level 
ditches in the Margarita swamp, on account of its nearness to France 
Field and Fort Randolph; this was drained into the bay and Coco 
Solo river, so that fresh water no longer gathers here and the tides 
reach practically all parts of it. It had previously been proposed to 
fill this swamp by suction dredges, pumping spoil from the sea at an 
estimated cost of nearly a million dollars, whereas the expedient 
adopted by the Army inspector cost but a few thousand dollars and 
will probably prove effective as a sanitary measure. 

Owing to the high Anopheles prevalence and increased malaria 
rate manifested at Gatun at the beginning of the rainy season in 
1919, observations were made which showed that enormous flights of 
mosquitoes were coming across the Canal from the swamp back of 
fill 3 formed by damming of water between the river dike and the 
spoil of the French canal, making a swamp nearly a square mile in 
area, the greater portion of it within a mile of Gatun locks. • Experi- 
ments made by Mr. J. A. Le Prince, former chief sanitary inspector, in 
1913, demonstrated flights from this swamp at a time when spoil 
was being pumped into it by suction dredges; but because of the 
nearly flat slope and luxuriant vegetation that established itself, 
and the tremendous precipitation of the rainy season, it appears that 
the swampy condition reappeared so as to permit prolific Anoj)lieles 
breeding again. In July, 1919, work was begun in this swamp by 
putting a laj'ge ditch through the western part of it, with laterals 
toward the Canal at about .500.foot intervals, and now no water is to 
be found there except at its furthermost northern extremity. 

Other swamps in the vicinitv of Mindi were drained and the contin- 
uity of the old French east diversion from Boca Mindi to the canal 
was restored by connecting the interrupted portions through a culvert 
under the railroad. 

At Pedro Miguel extensive tile drainage was installed in the forti- 
fication clearings formerly used as cattle pastures. Owing to the 
difficulty of controlling xinopheles breeding in cattle pastures, it has 
been found necessary to insist more strictly upon observance of the 
rule promulgated in 1916 that no cattle pastures be permitted within 
a mile of sanitated settlements. 

In the Ancon-Corozal district the outlying areas requiring mainte- 
nance by oiling and other temporary measures have been put in 
better condition by the construction of open ditches lined with con- 
crete sectional half-round drains or by the installation of rock-covered 
concrete tile. It has been found that precast concrete drains are far 
cheaper than clay tile, and are equally satisfactory for all our purposes. 
The health department is now manufacturing all its own drains 
at the larvacide plant at Ancon. 

In connection with the construction of the new Ai"my camp (Fort 
Clayton) at Miraflores, the surface of the Cardenas river — a prolific 
Anopheles producer has been lowered 7 feet by tunnelling under the 
floor of the concrete railroad and wagon bridge, admitting every 
tide and allowing the river to reduce to a very small stream between 



814 THE PANAMA CANAL. 

tides. Several larg(> j)()n(ls also \V(>r(^ drained or controlled in this area; 
the sanitation of Corozal profits thereby, as all these breeding places 
Avere close en(ni(>;h for fli(]jhts into the residence section. 

The Balboa district re([uired no extensive construction during the 
year, but tlie large liydraulic fill north of town demands an increasing 
amount of attention because of unec(ual settling, and also because 
of its becoming gi-ass(>(l over, holding and concealing the water of thfe 
rainy season and allowing it to seep out at tlu* margins of grassy spots 
so as to produce sufficient moisture on the surface for breeding. 
Ditches dug in the material are rapidly obliterated by the rains; 
also the contours change with settling, so no permanent work can as 
yet be attempted for its control. 

The' two large .Vrmy posts of permanent concrete construction will 
soon be completed. Each will accommodate a full regiment of in- 
fantry and both will require an extension of our sanitated areas to 
protect their soldiec populations. Fort Clayton, at Miraflores, pre- 
sents no unusual features of sanitation. The Cardenas River will 
have to be ''trained" for some distance above the post, and there 
will appear the usual small streams, springs, and seepage areas to 
be controlled. Fort Davis, at Gatun, is not so well situated, being 
in close ])roximity to large, flat, swampy areas, in which cattle are 
pastured, so that quite extensive and expensive work should be done 
before soldiers are stationed there. From some of the nearby pas- 
tures the cattle must be removed and their hoof prints eliminated b}^ 
filling or grading. It has been found impossible in our wet season 
frequently even in steep hill land, to drain pastures so that they will 
not be punched up by the feet of cattle. These hoof prints are always 
favorite breeding places for Anoplieles and to control them effectively 
by oiling is impracticable and costly because of the difficulty of 
searching out and finding every one of them. 

Cattle camp malaria. — In spite of the administration of quinine in 
10-grain doses each night to such employees of the cattle pasture 
clearing camps as will accept it, the malaria rate of these camps 
continues high. They are largely recruited from the natives of the 
Ke])ublic of Panama, the greater number of whom are prohabW 
chronic carriers of the malaria organism. Living in temporar}-, 
open, thatched bunk houses, on the banks of lagoons and streams, 
as they hew out clearings in the virgin jimgle where little sanitation 
is feasible, they are ccmtinuallv exposed to attack by hordes of 
mosc{uitoes. The best solution of the problem seems to lie in pro- 
viding suitable screened ])uildings of a knockdown portable type if 
necessary, and a more routine administration of quinine as a 
))rophylactic. 

Hats and autipl(((/u< ivoii\ Because of the presence of i)lague in 
both North and South American ports, the possibility f)f its intro- 
duction here is ever borne in mind. Systematic rat destruction is 
done in the terminal cities by poison and by traps, and all rats and 
mice caught or found dead (if not too badly decomposed) are sent 
to the Board of Ih^altli Lal)orator3' for autopsy. No ])lague infection 
has l)een found in any of these. Bu